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President-Elect Barack Obama "Commemorative Coins"

President-Elect Barack Obama "Commemorative Coins", not official United States Mint product
Source: The New England Mint
Not colorized by the United States Mint

It has come to the attention of the United States Mint that several private commercial businesses are advertising so-called "Barack Obama Presidential $1 Coins," as well as commemorative half-dollar coins, American Eagle Silver Coins and multi-coin sets bearing images of the President-Elect. These advertisements feature genuine United States coins that the private commercial businesses have altered by affixing a colorized image to the coin. Additionally, some businesses have treated the coins by gold-plating them.

These items are not official United States Mint products. Furthermore, these products, businesses, and advertisements are not approved, endorsed, sponsored, or authorized by the United States Mint, the Department of the Treasury, or the United States Government.

The United States Mint receives frequent inquiries from the public concerning its position on the industry practice of superimposing colorized images—such as those of prominent public figures, celebrities, or cartoon characters—on genuine United States coins. The United States Mint does not encourage, endorse, or sponsor products that alter the fundamental images depicted on its coins. Congress itself mandates by statute the design themes and inscriptions that appear on United States coins. A superimposed image is entirely different from and obscures the coin's original design.


Fraudulent Presidential $1 Error Coins Being Sold

The United States Mint has recently learned that some individuals are grinding the rims of Presidential $1 Coins to remove the edge-incused inscriptions and then marketing these altered items as error coins. This practice not only exploits unwary consumers and collectors, but also is a Federal crime.

The United States Mint recently announced that an undetermined number of George Washington Presidential $1 Coins were minted and issued without the required edge-incused inscriptions, "E Pluribus Unum," "In God We Trust," the year of issuance, and the mint mark. Because true error coins such as these can be rare, they often become very attractive among collectors, many of whom are willing to acquire them at a premium above their face value. Apparently, some individuals are exploiting this situation by altering the rims of perfectly good Presidential $1 Coins to make them look like the recent error coins.

Although altering and defacing United States coinage generally is not illegal, doing so violates a Federal criminal statute (18 U.S.C. § 331) when the act is accompanied by an intent to defraud. Accordingly, a person is committing a Federal crime if he or she intentionally alters an ordinary Presidential $1 Coin to make it look like an error coin for the purpose of selling it at a premium to someone who believes it to be a real error coin. Under this statute, it is also a Federal crime to sell at a premium an ordinary Presidential $1 Coin that one knows has been altered so it looks like an error coin to someone who believes it to be a real error coin. Penalties include a fine and up to five years in prison.

The United States Mint has no Federal enforcement authority. Rather, it refers such matters to the United States Secret Service, which is lawfully authorized to detect and arrest any person who violates a Federal law relating to United States coinage.

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Presidential $1 Coins With "Upside-Down" Edge-Lettering Are Not Errors

It has come to the attention of the United States Mint that some people are offering to sell so-called George Washington Presidential $1 "error" coins with "upside-down" edge-lettering on on-line auction sites. These coins are not "error" coins. The Presidential $1 Coins are inscribed on the edge without regard to their "heads" or "tails" orientation.

The edge-incused inscriptions on Presidential $1 Coins are the year of minting or issuance, "E Pluribus Unum," "In God We Trust" and the mint mark. The United States Mint incuses these inscriptions on the edge of each coin at the second step of a two-step coining process. In the first step, the blanks are fed into a coining machine which impresses the obverse and reverse designs onto the coins, and dispenses the coins into a large bin. In the second step, the bin is transported to the edge-incusing machine, into which the coins are fed at random, without regard to their "heads" or "tails" orientation. Therefore, statistically, approximately one-half of the coins produced will have edge-lettering oriented toward the "heads" side (obverse), and approximately one-half of the coins will have the edge-incused inscriptions oriented toward the "tails" side (reverse).

For more information on the Presidential $1 Coin Program go to www.usmint.gov/$1coin.

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Early Release of Presidential $1 Coins

It has come to the attention of the United States Mint that several private businesses are offering to sell George Washington Presidential $1 Coins prior to the official public release date on Thursday, February 15, 2007. The United States Mint wants to make consumers who are considering the purchase of these products aware of certain facts.

  • The United States Mint has issued George Washington Presidential $1 Coins only to the Federal Reserve. The Federal Reserve has made arrangements with banks and other financial institutions to ensure that these coins are in their inventories up to two weeks prior to the official public release date, February 15, 2007.
  • George Washington Presidential $1 Coins will be available for purchase at face value to all members of the public at their local financial institutions beginning on February 15, 2007. The banks and other financial institutions that have entered into such arrangements have agreed not to distribute George Washington Presidential $1 Coins before this official public release date.
  • The Presidential $1 Coins currently being offered for sale by private businesses, often with a considerable mark-up, are the same circulating quality coins that will be available to all members of the public from their local banks and other financial institutions on February 15, 2007. These are not the proof or uncirculated quality coins that are found in United States Mint proof and uncirculated coin sets, nor are they official "early releases" or "first strikes."
  • For more information on the Presidential $1 Coin Program go to www.usmint.gov/$1coin.

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NORFED’s "Liberty Dollars"

Liberty Dollar Obverse Liberty Dollar Reverse
Source: NORFED, Inc.

The National Organization for the Repeal of the Federal Reserve Act and the Internal Revenue Code (NORFED) is producing and marketing gold and silver medallions that NORFED calls "Liberty Dollars." The United States Mint and the United States Department of Justice have received inquiries regarding the legality of these so-called "Liberty Dollar" medallions. The United States Mint urges consumers who are considering the purchase or use of these items to be aware that they are not genuine United States Mint bullion coins and they are not legal tender. These medallions are privately produced products and are not backed by, nor affiliated in any way with, the United States Government. Moreover, prosecutors with the Department of Justice have determined that the use of these gold and silver NORFED "Liberty Dollar" medallions as circulating money is a Federal crime.

Consumers may find advertisements for these medallions confusing and should take note of several issues related to them.

First, the advertisements refer to the product as "real money" and "currency." These medallions might look like real money because they—

  • Bear the inscriptions, "Liberty," "Dollars," "Trust in God" (similar to "In God We Trust"), and "USA" (similar to "United States of America"), and an inscription purporting to denote the year of production; and

  •  
  • Depict images that are similar to United States coins, such as the torch on the reverses of the current dime coin, 1986 Statute of Liberty commemorative silver dollar and 1993 Bill of Rights commemorative half-dollar, and the Liberty Head designs on the obverses of United States gold coins from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s.
However, despite their misleading appearance, NORFED "Liberty Dollar" medallions are not genuine United States Mint coins and they are not legal tender.

Second, the advertisements confusingly refer to NORFED "Liberty Dollar" medallions as "legal" and "constitutional." However, under the Constitution ( Article I, section 8, clause 5 ), Congress has the exclusive power to coin money of the United States and to regulate its value. By statute ( 31 U.S.C. § 5112(a) ), Congress specifies the coins that the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to mint and issue and requires the Secretary to carry out these duties at the United States Mint (31 U.S.C. § 5131). Accordingly, the United States Mint is the only entity in the United States with the lawful authority to mint and issue legal tender United States coins.

Under 18 U.S.C. § 486, it is a Federal crime to utter or pass, or attempt to utter or pass, any coins of gold or silver intended for use as current money except as authorized by law. According to the NORFED website, "Liberty merchants" are encouraged to accept NORFED "Liberty Dollar" medallions and offer them as change in sales transactions of merchandise or services. Further, NORFED tells "Liberty associates" that they can earn money by obtaining NORFED "Liberty Dollar" medallions at a discount and then can "spend [them] into circulation." Therefore, NORFED’s "Liberty Dollar" medallions are specifically intended to be used as current money in order to limit reliance on, and to compete with the circulating coinage of the United States. Consequently, prosecutors with the United States Department of Justice have concluded that the use of NORFED’s "Liberty Dollar" medallions violates 18 U.S.C. § 486.

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"First Strike"

The United States Mint has received inquiries from consumers regarding use of the term "first strike." The term has appeared in connection with the advertising and grading of 2005 and 2006 silver, gold, and platinum proof and bullion American Eagle Coins, and the new 2006 24-karat proof and bullion American Buffalo Gold Coins. Currently, there is no widely-accepted and standardized numismatic industry definition of "first strike." Coin dealers and grading services may use this term in varying ways. Some base its use on dates appearing on United States Mint product packaging or packing slips, or on the dates of product releases or ceremonial coin strike events. Consumers should carefully review the following information along with each dealer’s or grading service’s definition of "first strike" when considering a purchase of coins with this designation.

The United States Mint has not designated any 2005 or 2006 American Eagle Coins or 2006 American Buffalo Coins as "first strikes," nor do we track the order in which we mint such coins during their production. The United States Mint held a launch ceremony for the 2006 American Buffalo Gold Coin on June 20, 2006, two days before its release on June 22, at which two proof coins and two uncirculated coins were ceremonially struck. However, those coins were not individually identified and were put in regular inventory after the ceremony. The United States Mint did not hold any striking ceremonies for the 2005 or 2006 American Eagle Coins.

The United States Mint strives to produce coins of consistently high quality throughout the course of production. Our strict quality controls assure that coins of this caliber are produced from each die set throughout its useful life. Our manufacturing facilities use a die set as long as the quality of resulting coins meets United States Mint standards, and then replace the dies, continually changing sets throughout the production process. For bullion American Eagle and American Buffalo Coins, the United States Mint makes an average of about 6,000 coins from one die set. For proof versions of the 2006 American Buffalo Coins, the yield is an average of about 1,500 coins per die set. For proof versions of the American Eagle Coins, the yield is an average of about 300-500 coins per die set. This means that coins may be minted from new die sets at any point and at multiple times while production of a coin is ongoing, not just the first day or at the beginning of production. To put this in context, in 2005 the United States Mint produced approximately 356,500 one-ounce gold, 8,891,000 silver, and 6,300 one-ounce platinum American Eagle Bullion Coins.

American Eagle and American Buffalo Coins are not individually numbered and the United States Mint does not keep track of the order or date of minting of individual bullion or proof coins. The United States Mint begins production several weeks before these coins are scheduled to be released. By the release dates for 2005 and 2006 bullion coins, the United States Mint had already minted approximately 50% of the projected sales numbers for these coins. Any dates on shipping boxes containing uncirculated bullion coins sent to Authorized Purchasers are strictly for quality control and accounting purposes at the United States Mint at West Point. The date on the box represents the date that the box was packed, verified as 500 ounces and sealed, and the date of packaging does not necessarily correlate with the date of manufacture. The date on shipping labels and packing slips for proof coins, which are sent directly to United States Mint customers from our fulfillment center, is the date the item was packed and shipped by the fulfillment center. The other numbers on the shipping label and packing slip are used to track the order and for quality control.

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"SILVER SURFER" QUARTERS

"Silver Surfer Quarters" Source:The Franklin Mint and 20th Century Fox

The United States Mint has learned that 20th Century Fox and The Franklin Mint are promoting the movie, "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer," by placing a printed image of the "Silver Surfer" character, along with the movie's web address, on 40,000 California state commemorative quarter-dollar coins, and releasing these coins into circulation. This promotion is in no way approved, authorized, endorsed, or sponsored by the United States Mint, nor is it in any way associated or affiliated with the United States Mint.

Although the United States Mint does not have the authority to enforce Federal criminal laws pertaining to the integrity of U.S. coinage, one such law specifically addresses the use of U.S. coinage for commercial advertising. The relevant statute is 18 U.S.C. § 475, which states the following:

18 U.S.C. § 475. Imitating obligations or securities; advertisements.
Whoever designs, engraves, prints, makes, or executes, or utters, issues, distributes, circulates, or uses any business or professional card, notice, placard, circular, handbill, or advertisement in the likeness or similitude of any obligation or security of the United States issued under or authorized by any Act of Congress or writes, prints, or otherwise impresses upon or attaches to any such instrument, obligation, or security, or any coin of the United States, any business or professional card, notice, or advertisement, or any notice or advertisement whatever, shall be fined under this title.

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NEW FEDERAL REGULATION PROHIBITING EXPORTATION, MELTING, OR TREATMENT OF UNITED STATES ONE-CENT AND 5-CENT COINS

On December 12, 2006, United States Mint Director Edmund Moy approved an interim rule that generally prohibits the exportation, melting, or treatment of United States one-cent coins (pennies) and 5-cent coins (nickels), which became effective upon publication in the Federal Register on December 20, 2006. Because of the rising commodity prices of copper, nickel and zinc, the value of the metal content of both pennies and nickels now exceeds their respective face values. Accordingly, there is concern that speculators could remove pennies and nickels from circulation and sell them as scrap metal for profit. Widespread withdrawal of pennies and nickels from circulation could cause coin shortages, and it would be extremely costly to replenish them, given prevailing metal prices and production costs.

This measure has been implemented to protect the coinage of the United States. A violation of the new restrictions can lead to a fine of up to $10,000, imprisonment of up to 5 years, and forfeiture of the subject coins or metal. The authority for implementing this regulation is Title 31 of the United States Code, Section 5111(d).

You can view the complete "New Regulation" press release , and the Federal Register Notice PDF.

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United States Mint Seeks To Protect Consumers and Hobby From Misuse of Official Name and Emblems--Public Comment Sought on New Rule

The Secretary of the Treasury has authorized the implementation of a regulation that would help protect consumers and the coin-collecting hobby when the Department of the Treasury’s and the United States Mint’s names and emblems are used in confusing, misleading and deceptive advertising.  The United States Mint is soliciting public comment on the proposed rule, which will be published in the Federal Register.  The regulation would allow the United States Mint to fine those who misuse its name or emblems or those of the Department of the Treasury.  The authority for implementing this regulation is Title 31 of the United States Code, Section 333.

You can view the complete "New Rule" press release.

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Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands'
"Freedom Tower" Silver Dollar

The United States Mint wants to alert consumers and the public about a new product being marketed by a private firm -- the National Collector's Mint, Inc.  The National Collector's Mint, Inc. advertises this product as a "Freedom Tower Silver Dollar" originating from the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and claims that it is a "legally authorized government issue" coin.  On October 13, 2004, the New York Supreme Court issued a temporary restraining order against the National Collector’s Mint, Inc., immediately halting the advertisement and sale of the "Freedom Tower Silver Dollar."  Consumers who have questions or concerns about the "Freedom Tower Silver Dollar" can contact the New York Attorney General’s Office at www.oag.state.ny.us or by calling the Attorney General’s consumer help line at (800) 771-7755 (in-state) or (518) 474-5481 (out-of-state).

The "Freedom Tower Silver Dollar" is not a genuine United States Mint coin or medal.  Under the Constitution, Congress has the exclusive power to coin money of the United States.  Congress has delegated its authority to mint and issue coins to the Secretary of Treasury, and Congress requires the Secretary to carry out these duties at the United States Mint.  Thus, the United States Mint is the only government entity in the United States with the authority to coin money.  Clearly, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. insular possession, does not have the authority to coin its own money.

Consumers may find the advertisements for this product confusing because the National Collector's Mint uses phrases such as "legally authorized government issue," "U.S. territorial minting," and "silver dollar."  The product itself may be confusing because it bears the denomination "One Dollar" and the inscription "In God We Trust," which Congress requires on all United States coins.  Congress did not authorize the National Collector's Mint product, and the United States Government does not endorse it.

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1936-dated Proof Set "Tribute" (Replica)

The United States Mint is aware of recent efforts by the National Collector's Mint to market a replica of the United States Mint's 1936-dated Proof Set.  Consumers should know that the National Collector's Mint is a business not affiliated or connected in any way with the United States Mint or the United States Government.  The product - featuring medallions that closely resemble coins produced in 1936 - includes no genuine United States coins.

The set, which is identified as a "tribute" to the first proof set produced by the United States Mint in 1936, features no genuine coins.  Instead, the medallions contained in the set are reproductions and have a metal content different from the genuine coins produced by the United States Mint.  Actual proof sets produced by the United States Mint in 1936 remain a popular item among collectors.

Consumers should note that the medallions in the National Collector's Mint "tribute" set are metallurgically different than their U.S. coin counterparts.  For example, the National Collector's Mint's "penny" medallion is made entirely of copper.  Actual 1936-dated Lincoln pennies, backed by the United States Government, consist of 95 percent copper, and 5 percent tin and zinc.

Similarly, the National Collector's Mint's "nickel" medallion is made of "pure silver clad." Actual 1936-dated Indian Head/Buffalo nickels consist of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel.  Additionally, the image used on the National Collector's Mint's "nickel" medallion appears to have been taken from the 2001-dated Buffalo Commemorative Coin, itself based on the original Indian Head/Buffalo nickel (designed in 1913).  The size of the head in relation to the inscription "LIBERTY" on the "tribute" nickel's obverse, as well as details in the subject's braid, hair and face, reflect the 2001-design and not the original design used in 1936.

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2003 Missouri State Quarter Products

(position your mouse over images to see the obverse)
Reverse and obverse faces of the Missouri Quarter.   Reverse and obverse faces of the medallion replica.
Genuine Missouri State Quarter
Source: United States Mint
  Medallion
Source: National Collector's Mint, Inc.

The National Collector's Mint is now producing and marketing a medallion that purports to be "the state quarter that the U.S. Government refused to mint." The United States Mint urges consumers who are considering the purchase of this item to be aware that it is not a genuine United States Mint quarter-dollar coin and is not legal tender. The medallion is a privately-produced product not backed by the United States Government.

Consumers may find the accompanying advertisements of this medallion confusing and should take note of several issues related to them. First, the advertisement refers to the product as a "state quarter." The featured product is not a state quarter but, rather, a medallion featuring the same obverse design as genuine quarter-dollar coins. Second, the image of the obverse side of the medallion in the advertisement is not an image of the actual product being sold. The image in the advertisement does not include the word "copy," while the actual product does.

The obverse design depicted on the National Collector's Mint medallion is nearly a copy of the obverse design on genuine Missouri quarter-dollar coins featuring George Washington. The word "copy" does appear on the likeness of George Washington on the medallion. This medallion also carries an "S" mint mark, which is usually reserved for United States coins that are legal tender and produced at the San Francisco Mint.

The reverse design depicted on the National Collector's Mint's medallion is a different version of the design on genuine Missouri quarter-dollar coins. The Secretary of the Treasury approved the reverse design on Missouri quarter-dollar coins produced by the United States Mint and the approved design is the only design that may appear on Missouri quarter-dollar coins backed by the United States Government.

Additional information concerning coin production can be found in the "About The Mint" section of the United States Mint's web pages.

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Operation Iraqi Freedom Commemorative Products

Operation Iraqi Freedom Colorized Coin
Source:
Morgan Mint
Not colorized by United States Mint

Recent Internet advertisements for "Operation Freedom" colorized Kennedy half-dollars have caught the attention of the United States Mint and the Michigan State Attorney General's Office. Touted as commemorative coins, the advertisements have generated confusion among consumers who believe the colorized coins are genuine commemorative coins produced by the United States Mint. Other advertisements include colorized Eisenhower dollar coins and American Eagle silver bullion coins paying homage to the U.S. armed forces in Iraq.

Only the United States Congress may direct the minting of an official, legal tender U.S. commemorative coin whose proceeds may be used to assist a particular cause or organization. The United States Mint encourages the public to support and honor the U.S. military in any way they can. We merely urge consumers who are considering the purchase of these items to be aware that they are not genuine United States Mint commemorative coins, but instead privately colorized U.S. coins that the U.S. Government neither endorses nor sponsors.

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Columbia Space Shuttle Commemorative Products

Shuttle Disaster Medallion Obverse
Source:
Morgan Mint
Not colorized by United States Mint

Since February 1, 2003, a number of private firms have been marketing medallions and other coin-related products in remembrance of the Columbia Space Shuttle and that day's tragic events. The United States Mint has received calls indicating that these products are confusing to consumers-many of whom believe that these items are legal tender coins colorized by the United States Mint, U.S. commemorative coins, or United States Mint official medals.

Under law, only Congress can direct the minting of an official, legal tender U.S. commemorative coin or official United States Mint medal whose proceeds may be used to assist a particular cause or organization. The United States Mint encourages the public to remember and honor the Columbia Space Shuttle and its crew in any way they can. We merely urge consumers who are considering the purchase of a medallion or coin-related item in their memory to be aware that they are not genuine United States Mint commemorative coins or medals, but privately manufactured medallions or privately colorized U.S. coins that the U.S. Government neither endorses nor sponsors.

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Coin Confusion Clarified
United States Mint Settlement Raises Awareness

In a victory for coin collectors across America, the United States Mint today announced a historic settlement in which the defendant, Washington Mint, LLC, a private mint located in Minnesota, must serve notice to customers, helping them distinguish between genuine United States coins and privately- produced coin replicas.

"This historic settlement affirms the United States Mint's commitment to protect and inform its customers, to educate consumers across the nation, and to safeguard the United States Mint's reputation for producing the highest quality coins and products," said United States Mint Director Henrietta Holsman Fore.

In the agreement, the Justice Department settled all of the United States Mint’s trademark and false advertising claims against the Washington Mint.  The settlement marks the end of three years of litigation in which the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota found the Washington Mint, a private company specializing in medallions and collectables, liable for infringing the United States Mint's trademark and for engaging in false and deceptive advertising.

As part of the agreement, Washington Mint must assist the United States Mint in its efforts to eliminate existing confusion in the marketplace.  The Washington Mint has agreed to serve a consumer awareness notice to its customers of U.S. coins and replicas of U.S. coins since January 1, 2000, providing information that will assist customers in distinguishing genuine United States coins from privately produced look-alikes or replicas.

The notice is also intended to help eliminate confusion in the minds of consumers by more clearly identifying the Washington Mint as a private company, not associated in any way with the United States Mint.  Under the United States Constitution and federal law, Congress has established the United States Mint as the only entity authorized to produce genuine, legal tender United States coins.

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"Elvis Presley® 25th Anniversary Tennessee
State Quarter Tribute"

The United States Mint has received inquiries regarding the "Elvis Presley® 25th Anniversary Tennessee State Quarter Tribute," now available in the collector's market.  The colorized quarters are not sponsored or endorsed by the United States Government.  The inquiries appear to stem from recent newspaper advertisements from the International Collectors Society, a commercial business operating in Owings Mills, Maryland.  Consumers should know that the International Collectors Society is a business not affiliated or connected in any way with the United States Mint or the United States Government.

The United States Mint receives frequent inquiries from the public concerning its position on the industry practice of superimposing images of prominent public figures on genuine U.S. coins, such as the "Elvis Presley® 25th Anniversary Tennessee State Quarter Tribute," featured here.  The United States Mint does not encourage, endorse or sponsor products that alter the fundamental images depicted on its coins.  A superimposed design is entirely different than the coin's original image and almost obliterates the coin's organic design.  Altering United States Mint coins this way may heighten the concerns of people who regard the images and designs on our Nation's coinage as sacrosanct.  Indeed, Congress itself mandates by statute the design themes and inscriptions that appear on a particular coin.  In this case, the International Collectors Society is superimposing an image of Elvis Presley® on the obverse of a quarter dollar coin that Congress directed the United States Mint to produce with a portrait of George Washington for the purpose of commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of George Washington in 1931.

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September 11 Commemorative Products

World Trade Center Medallion Obverse World Trade Center Medallion Obverse
Source:
National Collector's Mint, Inc.
Source:
The American Historic Society
Not colorized by United States Mint

Since September 11, 2001, a number of private firms have been marketing medallions and other coin-related products in remembrance of that day's tragic events.  The United States Mint has received calls indicating that these products are confusing to consumers - many of whom believe that these items are legal tender coins colorized by the United States Mint, U.S. commemorative coins, or United States Mint official medals.

Under law, only Congress can direct the minting of an official, legal tender U.S. commemorative coin or official United States Mint medal whose proceeds may be used to assist a particular cause or organization.  Although the United States Mint is aware that Congress is considering such action, at this time, Congress has not authorized the United States Mint to produce an official coin or medal related to the September 11 events.  The United States Mint encourages the public to support recovery efforts.  We merely urge consumers who are considering the purchase of a medallion or coin-related item pertaining to the events of September 11 to be aware that they are not genuine United States Mint commemorative coins or medals, but privately manufactured medallions or privately colorized U.S. coins that the U.S. Government neither endorses nor sponsors.

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American Buffalo Commemorative Coin


Genuine United States Mint American Buffalo Commemorative Silver Dollar Replica of U.S. Mint American Buffalo Commemorative Coin
Genuine United States Mint American
Buffalo Commemorative Coin
Source: The United
States Mint
Replica of United States Mint American
Buffalo Commemorative Coin
Source: National Collector's Mint, Inc.

Inscription "IN GOD WE TRUST" appears near the upper portion of the coin.

Inscription "E PLURIBUS UNUM" appears under the buffalo’s head.

Official denomination of the coin – "ONE DOLLAR"
appears below buffalo.

Genuine coin shows the Philadelphia (P) mint mark below the denomination.

Genuine coin displays the mintage year "2001" on the obverse (Native American) side.

Replica's inscription reads: ".999 FINE SILVER".

Replica does not have an inscription under the buffalo's head.

Replica's inscription reads "GIANT BUFFALO PROOF".

Replica does not display the Philadelphia (P) mint mark.

Replica displays mintage year "2001" below the buffalo.

Buffalo Commemorative - Obverse and Reverse

The United States Mint has received numerous inquiries regarding replicas of the new American Buffalo Commemorative Silver Dollar now available in the collectors market.  The replicas are not genuine U.S. coins and are not sponsored or endorsed by the United States Government.  The majority of inquiries appear to stem from advertisements by the National Collector's Mint, Inc., a business hosting a mail drop in Washington, DC.  Consumers should know that the National Collector's Mint, Inc. is a business not affiliated with the United States Mint, or the U.S. Government.

If you are unsure whether the product you have purchased from a business is an genuine United States Mint American Buffalo Commemorative Silver Dollar, you should note that the genuine coin features the year (2001) and artist's initial ("F" for "Fraser") on the obverse and the denomination (One Dollar) and mint mark ("P" for "Philadelphia") on the reverse.  The National Collector's Mint, Inc. 3 ½ inch replica features the words "Giant Buffalo Proof."  For additional information, please visit the United States Mint's Pressroom.  For more tips on identifying the differences between genuine U.S. coins and replicas, please visit Tips on Identifying U.S. Coins

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