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Commemorative coins

Sports Commemoratives

Here's a special collection of commemorative coins on the subject of sports. A commemorative is a special coin, issued to honor an outstanding person, place, or event in history.

  • 1983 U.S. Olympic Coin  - Discus Thrower: front 1983 U.S. Olympic Coin - Discus Thrower: back

    Los Angeles Olympiad (1983, 1984)

    1983 $1 Silver: Discus

    Obverse (front): The image symbolizes the traditional Greek discus thrower. It's based on an ancient sculpture by an artist named Myron. The five Olympic rings are a longstanding symbol of the Olympic Games.

    Reverse (back): An American eagle is shown on the back of this silver coin. The eagle is not shown in flight, but standing still. Only his head and upper body are depicted, allowing a close-up view of his vigilant expression.

  • 1984 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torch Runners: front 1984 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torch Runners: back

    Los Angeles Olympiad (1983, 1984)

    1984 $10 Gold: Torch Runners

    Obverse: Two runners carry the Olympic torch aloft. To the left is the five-ring symbol of the Olympics and below is the number XXIII (23) of 1984's Games. This coin is the first ever to bear the "W" mint mark of the West Point facility.

    Reverse: The eagle on the back of this coin is modeled after the one on the front of the Great Seal of the United States.

  • 1984 U.S. Olympic Coin - Coliseum: front 1984 U.S. Olympic Coin - Coliseum: back

    Los Angeles Olympiad (1983, 1984)

    1984 $1 Silver: Coliseum

    Obverse: Robert Graham designed this coin. Graham also created the controversial headless sculptures at the entrance to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Graham's sculptures are shown with the Coliseum behind them.

    Reverse: An American Bald Eagle stands guard on the back of this silver coin, its head turned. One foot grasps the top of a rock while the other, lower down the rock, holds the rock and an olive branch.

  • 1988 U.S. Olympic Coin - Liberty: front 1988 U.S. Olympic Coin - Liberty: back

    Seoul Olympiad (1988)

    1988 $5 Gold: Liberty

    Obverse: On the front of the gold coin, we see the head of Nike, goddess of victory. Nike wears a crown of olive leaves. The tradition of crowning Olympic winners with wreaths goes back to the ancient Games.

    Reverse: On the back, a stylized Olympic flame burns beneath the Olympic five-ring symbol. The flame speaks of the spectacle of the Games and the renewal of the Olympic spirit when it's lit again every 4 years.

  • 1988 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torches: front 1988 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torches: back

    Seoul Olympiad (1988)

    1988 $1 Silver: Torches

    Obverse: This silver dollar commemorates the participation of the United States in the 1988 Olympic Games held in Seoul, Korea. The Statue of Liberty's torch is shown touching the Olympic torch, forming one flame, inside a wreath.

    Reverse: Central to the design on the back is the Olympic rings symbol. Two olive branches frame the symbol and the words "1 dollar," USA," and "E Pluribus Unum," while the branches are framed by "United States of America."

  • 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Sprinter: front 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Sprinter: back

    XXV Olympiad (1992)

    1992 $5 Gold: Sprinter

    Obverse: This coin image shows a sprinter in a burst of speed. Sprinting is part of the summer Olympics, which were held in Barcelona, Spain, in 1992. These coins honor American Olympic athletes and help finance their training.

    Reverse: The back of the gold coin features two symbols. The five interlocked rings have been used to symbolize the Games since the Olympic Flag was created in the early 20th century. The eagle symbolizes the United States.

  • 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Baseball: front 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Baseball: back

    XXV Olympiad (1992)

    1992 $1 Silver: Baseball

    Obverse: The pitcher shown on the front of this silver dollar is firing a ball to home plate. Uncirculated dollars made in Denver have the phrase "XXV Olympiad" impressed four times around the edge on a reeded background.

    Reverse: The Olympic rings, upright olive branches, and a shield of stars and stripes provide an orderly backdrop for a small banner proclaiming "E Pluribus Unum," with "USA" encircled by three of the rings.

  • 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Gymnast: front 1992 U.S. Olympic Coin - Gymnast: back

    XXV Olympiad (1992)

    1992 Half Dollar Clad: Gymnast

    Obverse: A gymnast is suspended in mid-air in this striking design. Behind her, a close-up view of an American flag fills the field of the coin, showing only some of its stars and stripes while emphasizing the horizontal motion.

    Reverse: A torch, symbol of the Olympic Games, and an olive branch, symbol of peace, form the main part of this design. The words "Citius, Altius, Fortius" are the Olympic motto, meaning "Faster, Higher, Stronger."

  • 1994 World Cup Coin - Trophy: front 1994 World Cup Coin - Trophy: back

    World Cup Soccer Tournament (1994)

    1994 $5 Gold: Trophy

    Obverse: The World Cup trophy is the centerpiece of this design. The 1994 World Cup Tournament followed many soccer games among 141 nations. These coins celebrate the United States as host to the playoff.

    Reverse: All three coins in this series share the same design on the back, although they are of different sizes and metals. It shows the World Cup logo that is used on other World Cup coins, flanked by laurel branches.

  • 1994 World Cup Coin - Two Soccer Players: front 1994 World Cup Coin - Two Soccer Players: back

    World Cup Soccer Tournament (1994)

    1994 $1 Silver: Two Soccer Players

    Obverse: In the dramatic design on the front of this coin, two soccer players from opposing teams hone in on the ball. The action and intensity of the moment are clearly portrayed by the players' positions.

    Reverse: All three coins in this series share the same design on the back, although they are of different sizes and metals. It shows the World Cup logo that is used on other World Cup coins, flanked by laurel branches.

  • 1994 World Cup Coin -  Soccer Player: front 1994 World Cup Coin -  Soccer Player: back

    World Cup Soccer Tournament (1994)

    1994 Half Dollar Clad: Soccer Player

    Obverse: This design features a soccer player about to kick a ball. The large year 1994 stands out in the background. A fairly unusual design element is the horizontal (rather than curved) main inscriptions.

    Reverse: All three coins in this series share the same design on the back, although they are of different sizes and metals. It shows the World Cup logo that is used on other World Cup coins, flanked by laurel branches.

  • 1995 Special Olympics World Games: front 1995 Special Olympics World Games: back

    Special Olympics World Games (1995)

    1995 $1 Silver: Portrait

    Obverse: This coin commemorates the Special Olympics World Games and recognizes the achievements of the participants. The woman depicted is Eunice Kennedy Shriver, the founder of the Special Olympics.

    Reverse: An image of the Special Olympics Medal is shown on this coin. Entwined in the medal's ribbon is a rose under a quote from Mrs. Shriver: "As we hope for the best in them, hope is reborn in us."

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torch Runner: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Torch Runner: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $5 Gold: Torch Runner

    Obverse: Torch runners are honorary bearers of the Olympic flame. They carry the torch to the cauldron as part of the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games. In the background is the distinctive Atlanta skyline.

    Reverse: The side view of a bald eagle is the same on both of the gold coins in this series. This U.S. symbolic bird holds a banner in its beak that bears the dates of the Modern Olympic Games' first century.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Stadium: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Stadium: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $5 Gold: Olympic Stadium

    Obverse: The Olympic Torch is shown with the stadium of the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. The stadium, which seats 85,000, was the location of track and field events as well as the opening and closing ceremonies.

    Reverse: The side view of a bald eagle is the same on both of the gold coins in this series. This U.S. symbolic bird holds a banner in its beak that bears the dates of the Modern Olympic Games' first century.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Gymnastics: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Gymnastics: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $1 Silver: Gymnastics

    Obverse: The gymnastics competition was part of the ancient Olympic Games, when physical fitness was central to the Greek lifestyle. The sport was revived for men at the first of the modern Games in 1896. Women's gymnastics was added in 1928.

    Reverse: All four of the 1995 silver coins in this series share the same clasped hands design symbolizing the brotherhood and team spirit of the Olympic Games. The image is a flat, polished silhouette on a frosted field.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Paralympics: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Paralympics: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $1 Silver: Paralympic Runner

    Obverse: Two of the 16 Olympic coins honor the Xth Paralympic Games. The design features a blind tethered runner and the Paralympic mark. The word "spirit" appears in Braille on both the 1995 and 1996 Paralympic silver coins.

    Reverse: All four of the 1995 silver coins in this series share the same clasped hands design symbolizing the brotherhood and team spirit of the Olympic Games. The image is a flat, polished silhouette on a frosted field.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Track and Field: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Track and Field: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $1 Silver: Track and Field

    Obverse: The track and field competition has a special place in Olympics history: The opening heat of the men's 100-meter dash was the very first event of the Modern Olympic Games in Athens, Greece, in 1896.

    Reverse: All four of the 1995 silver coins in this series share the same clasped hands design symbolizing the brotherhood and team spirit of the Olympic Games. The image is a flat, polished silhouette on a frosted field.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Cycling: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Cycling: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 $1 Silver: Cycling

    Obverse: The bicycle was designed in the 15th century by Leonardo da Vinci. Cycling was an official men's sport at the first Modern Olympic Games in 1896. The women's cycling competition began at the 1984 Games in Los Angeles.

    Reverse: All four of the 1995 silver coins in this series share the same clasped hands design symbolizing the brotherhood and team spirit of the Olympic Games. The image is a flat, polished silhouette on a frosted field.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Basketball: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Basketball: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 Half Dollar Clad: Basketball

    Obverse: Men's basketball was first added to the Olympics program during the 1936 Berlin Games. Competition heated up when, in Barcelona's 1992 Games, the National Basketball Association's (NBA) professional players were allowed to take part.

    Reverse: The two 1995 cupronickel clad half dollars share the same mark of the the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games on a globe. The mark symbolizes nearly 200 nations coming together to compete at the 1996 Games.

  • 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Baseball: front 1995 U.S. Olympic Coin - Baseball: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1995 Half Dollar Clad: Baseball

    Obverse: Baseball is relatively new as an Olympic sport. It was part of the Olympics as a demonstration sport until 1992. In Barcelona, Spain, baseball was recognized, with full medal status, for the first time.

    Reverse: The two 1995 cupronickel clad half dollars share the same mark of the the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games on a globe. The mark symbolizes nearly 200 nations coming together to compete at the 1996 Games.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Flag Bearer: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Flag Bearer: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $5 Gold: Opening Ceremony

    Obverse: During the opening ceremonies at Olympic Games, athletes from every country lead their teams into the Olympic Stadium. Each leader carries the flag of the team's host nation.

    Reverse: Both 1996 gold coins share the same image: the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games surrounded by a laurel wreath, the award to winning Greek athletes during the ancient Olympic Games.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Cauldron: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Cauldron: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $5 Gold: Olympic Flame

    Obverse: The lighting of an Olympic flame that would burn during the Games began in ancient Greece. The concept was introduced to the modern Games in 1936 in Berlin and has become an Olympic tradition.

    Reverse: Both 1996 gold coins share the same image: the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games surrounded by a laurel wreath, the award to winning Greek athletes during the ancient Olympic Games.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Tennis: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Tennis: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $1 Silver: Women's Tennis

    Obverse: Women have played tennis since it was developed in the 1800s. Though part of the first modern Games in 1896, issues arose in 1924 about how to determine the amateur status of players. It was restored as a full-medal sport in 1988.

    Reverse: All four 1996 silver coins share the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to the left and text inscriptions to the right. The Olympic rings form the torch's bowl and its handle resembles a Greek column.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Paralympics: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Paralympics: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $1 Silver: Paralympic Track and Field

    Obverse: In this design, a wheelchair athlete competes in a track and field event. As on the 1995 Paralympic coin, the word "spirit" is inscribed in Braille and the Paralympic mark is shown.

    Reverse: All four 1996 silver coins share the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to the left and text inscriptions to the right. The Olympic rings form the torch's bowl and its handle resembles a Greek column.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Rowing: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Rowing: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $1 Silver: Men's Rowing

    Obverse: Men's rowing was slated for the first of the Modern Olympic Games, but rough weather forced the competition to be canceled. Rowing became an official Olympic sport in London's 1908 Games; women's rowing in 1976.

    Reverse: All four 1996 silver coins share the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to the left and text inscriptions to the right. The Olympic rings form the torch's bowl and its handle resembles a Greek column.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - High Jump: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - High Jump: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 $1 Silver: High Jump

    Obverse: The high jump became an Olympic sport in 1896. It was revolutionized in the Mexico City Olympic Games when the "Fosbury Flop," was introduced, quickly becoming the most commonly used technique.

    Reverse: All four 1996 silver coins share the mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to the left and text inscriptions to the right. The Olympic rings form the torch's bowl and its handle resembles a Greek column.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Swimming: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Swimming: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 Half Dollar Clad: Swimming

    Obverse: Swimming was part of an ancient Greek warrior's training. The 17th-century Japanese were perhaps the first to adopt the sport nationally. Today's Olympic Games include backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, and freestyle.

    Reverse: Both 1996 clad coins share their reverse design, the centered mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. Among the symbols in the mark, the handle uses the number "100" to resemble a Greek column.

  • 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Soccer: front 1996 U.S. Olympic Coin - Soccer: back

    XXVI Olympiad (1995, 1996)

    1996 Half Dollar Clad: Soccer

    Obverse: Soccer, the most popular sport in the world, became an Olympic sport at the London Olympic Games in 1908. At the Atlanta 1996 Centennial Games, women's soccer also became an Olympic sport.

    Reverse: Both 1996 clad coins share their reverse design, the centered mark of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. Among the symbols in the mark, the handle uses the number "100" to resemble a Greek column.

  • 1997 Jackie Robinson Coin - Portrait: front 1997 Jackie Robinson Coin - Portrait: back

    Jackie Robinson (1997)

    1997 $5 Gold: Portrait

    Obverse: The portrait of Jackie Robinson on the front of this coin shows him in his later years. After his career in baseball, he devoted much time to helping low-income children and as a leader in the civil rights movement.

    Reverse: A baseball is the central element in this design. Superimposed on the baseball are the years of Robinson's life (1919–1972) and the inscription, "Legacy of Courage," in the center.

  • 1997 Jackie Robinson Coin - Slide into Base: front 1997 Jackie Robinson Coin - Slide into Base: back

    Jackie Robinson (1997)

    1997 $1 Silver: Stealing Home Plate

    Obverse: This coin commemorates the 50th Anniversary of Robinson's breaking of the color barrier and his legacy. In the image, Robinson slides into home plate as he did during the 1955 World Series.

    Reverse: The design features the 50th anniversary logo of the Jackie Robinson Foundation surrounded by two of Mr. Robinson's accomplishments: "Rookie of the Year 1947" and "Hall of Fame 1962."

  • 2002 U.S. Olympic Coin - Crystal Emblem: front 2002 U.S. Olympic Coin - Crystal Emblem: back

    Salt Lake City Olympic Games (2002)

    2002 $5 Gold: Crystal Emblem

    Obverse: This coin features the 2002 Salt Lake Olympic Winter Games Crystal Emblem. Behind the emblem is the Games' secondary identity mark, which was entitled: "Rhythm of the Land."

    Reverse: On the back, a very stylized design portrays the Olympic flame. The real Olympic flame burns in a cauldron for the whole duration of the Games. The cauldron is also shown in the coin's design.

  • 2002 U.S. Olympic Coin - Crystal Emblem: front 2002 U.S. Olympic Coin - Crystal Emblem: back

    Salt Lake City Olympic Games (2002)

    2002 $1 Silver: Marks

    Obverse: In addition to the standard Olympic rings, two other symbols are used in this design. The Crystal Emblem and the "Rhythm of the Land" identity mark were created just for the 2002 Games.

    Reverse: Below the inscription "XIX Olympic Winter Games," the skyline of Salt Lake City is depicted. Behind the city, the majestic Rocky Mountains are seen, with the "Rhythm of the Land" mark overhead.

  • 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin
    Kids' Baseball Coin Design Challenge Winning Designs

    2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin

    Congratulations to Cassie McFarland, winner of the Baseball Coin Design Competition.

    Between April 11 and June 28, 2013, Kids across the Nation entered the Kids' Baseball Coin Design Challenge. Congratulations to Mollie, Ethan and Walter!

More Commemoratives at Coin News

Our collection of commemorative coins is small but growing with each year's new releases.  Pick any year to start enjoying this cool collection!


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