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Teacher Feature

Teacher Feature

Presidential $1 Coin Lesson Plans (Calvin Coolidge)

Overview

Students will use historical research to learn about the Kellogg-Briand Pact and the accomplishments of Calvin Coolidge through his Presidential $1 Coin.

Activity

Have the students research Calvin Coolidge to learn about his legislation and accomplishments while in office.  As a class, define the term "legislation" as the act of making or enacting laws. 

Display the May Coin of the Month to learn more about the 30th President of the United States.

Using information from class discussions and available online and classroom resources, have the students research current events of the 1920s, the Kellogg-Briand Pact, and Coolidge's major accomplishments during his presidency.  Also invite the students to research other legislation passed during the time Coolidge was in office. 

Have the students record their findings in a graphic organizer and write summary statements.  Discuss the students' findings and record them on chart paper or a white board. 

Students should apply their research findings to create a series of 5 to 8 dated journal entries written as if they were a member of Coolidge's staff during his presidency. 

As an extension, have the students explain why “Keep Cool With Coolidge” is a good campaign slogan.  Have them research campaign slogans of other presidents and how they related to events of the time, and summarize why they were effective. 

Make a Connection

Do you know that we have a collection of FREE lesson plans based on the Presidential $1 Coin Program

Choose one of the Presidential $1 Coin lesson plans from the United States Mint H.I.P. Pocket Change Web site.  Apply it to any president that you or your students choose: 

Find out more about the Presidential $1 and First Spouse Coins in the “Coins and Medals” section. 


Content Related Links


The Department of the Treasury Seal