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Quarter Combos

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Summary

Students will review coins and their values and create coin combinations that equal 25 cents.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will review coins and their values and create coin combinations that equal 25 cents.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups

Terms and Concepts

Value

Materials

  • Cents, nickels, dimes, quarters (real coins, play money, or paper coins copied from the reproducible coin sheets, pages 29-32), several copies per student
  • Dice (one die per group)
  • Quarter cards (page 20)
  • “Quarter Combos” work page (page 21)
  • Glue or paste
  • Scissors

Preparations

  • Copy and cut out quarter cards (eight cards per group, page 20).
  • Copy “Quarter Combos” work page (page 21), one per student.
  • Assemble one bag of coins per group, using an assortment of coins (cents, nickels, dimes, and quarters—based on students’ mastery of coin values, teachers should use their discretion in deciding which coins and how many of each coin to include in each set).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/244.pdf.

  1. Explain that the class will play a game where they will roll a die and collect coins. Each time a student collects enough coins to make an even trade for a quarter, he will collect a quarter card. The object of the game is to collect as many quarter cards as possible.
  2. Review coins and their values, if necessary.
  3. With two student volunteers, demonstrate the game “Add it Up” (see below).
  4. Allow students 15-20 minutes to play the game.
  5. After time is called, hand out the “Quarter Combos” work page (page 21) and several copies of the reproducible coin sheets (pages 29-32). Students should cut and paste coins to demonstrate four coin combinations that equal 25 cents.

How to Play “Add it Up”

  1. Players sit in a circle, with coins spread out in the middle. The pile of quarter cards can be placed next to the coins.
  2. The first player rolls the die, then takes coins equal to that value from the pile (e.g., player rolls a 5 and takes five cents or one nickel).
  3. The remaining players take turns in the same fashion, repeating turns until someone has 25 cents.
  4. Each time a player reaches 25 cents, he should call out “25 cents,” then count his money aloud. The other players should check his counting. He should then take one quarter card from the pile (to be colored later).
  5. When time is called, the player who has collected the most quarter cards wins.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Increase the difficulty of the game by using two dice, enabling students to achieve a greater variety of coin combinations.
  • Students can play “Add it Up” until they reach 50 cents/75 cents/a dollar.
  • Students can create and record coin combinations in higher amounts, then challenge others in school or at home to invent new combinations that are equal in value.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe and compare measurable attributes
Standards:

  • K.MD.1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
    • Describe several measurable attributes of a single object

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe several measurable attributes of a single object
Standards:

  • K.MD.2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.