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Money Matters

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Summary

Students will recognize a cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half-dollar, and Sacagawea Golden Dollar, and identify the value of each coin.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Half dollar
  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will recognize a cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half-dollar, and Sacagawea Golden Dollar, and identify the value of each coin.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group

Terms and Concepts

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Half dollar
  • Golden Dollar
  • Money
  • Coins
  • Value

Materials

  • Why Money Was Invented 1 by Neale S. Godfrey (optional)
  • Chart paper
  • Cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars, and Sacagawea Golden Dollars (real coins, or paper coins copied from the “Reproducible Coin Sheets” on pages 31 and 32)
  • “Money Matters” worksheets (pages 8 and 9), one per student
  • Glue
  • Pencils or crayons

Preparations

  • Gather several coins of each kind (cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars, and Sacagawea Golden Dollars).
  • Hang chart paper.
  • Preview book.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/246-251.pdf.

  1. Read Why Money Was Invented 1 by Neale S. Godfrey (optional).
  2. Focus on the objective by asking: “Can anyone name any of the coins that we use as money today?”
  3. List responses on chart paper. Complete list if all coins are not mentioned (cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half-dollar, Sacagawea Golden Dollar). You may wish to show sample coins and have students name them.
  4. Ask if anyone knows the value of any of the coins listed. List correct responses next to the appropriate coin. Explain the use of money symbols such as “$” and “¢” if children are not already familiar with them.
  5. Have students complete the two “Money Matters” worksheets (pages 8 and 9). These can be completed as a class or in small groups, with or without teacher assistance.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Read A Quarter From The Tooth Fairy 2 by Caren Hollzmon.
  • Have students practice making 25¢, 50¢, 75¢, and $1.00 using various coin combinations.
  • Have students create coin rubbings of several different coins using pencils and crayons.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.