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Trading Faces

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Summary

Students will use addition to determine values of coin combinations.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Half dollar
  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will use addition to determine values of coin combinations.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • First grade
  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups

Terms and Concepts

  • Add
  • Sum
  • Trade

Materials

  • Cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars,  and Golden  Dollars (real  coins, play money,  or paper coins copied  from the reproducible coin sheets (pages  29-32))
  • Reproducible coin sheets (pages  29-32) two per student
  • Dice, one per group
  • “Coin Combos  Tally Sheet” work page (page  4)
  • “Trading  Faces” work page (page  5)
  • Coffee cans, 1 per group

Preparations

  • If you are using paper coins for the game, you will need  to copy reproducible coin sheets (pages  29-32), cut out coins, laminate if possible, and put coins into coffee cans. Otherwise  you should  put real coins in the cans.
  • Copy reproducible coin sheets (pages  29-32) for student use.
  • Copy “Coin Combos  Tally Sheet” work page (page  4) and “Trading  Faces” work page (page  5).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/294.pdf.

  1. Explain that the class will divide into groups to play a game in which they will add together the value of various coins.
  2. Review values of the cent, nickel, dime, quarter, half-dollar, and Golden Dollar.  Prompt students to come up with possible trades that can be made (e.g., two nickels for a dime).
  3. With two to three student volunteers, demonstrate the game.  Allow each volunteer to take a turn.
  4. Distribute dice, cans of coins, and the “Coin Combos Tally Sheet” work page (page 4).
  5. Allow groups 20 minutes to play the game.  At end of 20 minutes, direct students to the “Coin Combos Tally Sheet” work page (page 4). Each student should record his or her coin combination by writing the value of each coin, the total number of coins he or she had, and the total value of the collection. Students should then cut and paste from the reproducible coin sheets (pages 29-32) to show an alternative combination that equals the same amount.
  6. Students can complete the “Trading Faces” work page (page 5) in class or at home.

How to Play "Trading Faces"

  1. Players sit in a circle with a coffee can full of coins (cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars, and Golden Dollars) and a pile of coins (nickels, dimes, and quarters) in the middle.
  1. Students will pull coins from the can for each turn; the pile of coins will be used as a “bank,” for making trades.
  2. The first player rolls the die and collects the indicated number of coins from the can and determines the value of the coins he’s collected. If the student has picked a Golden Dollar, he may take another turn.  Otherwise, the next player rolls.
  3. Remaining players take turns, repeating until time is called.
  4. Throughout the game, the teacher should stop the game periodically and remind students that they may have some coins in their piles that they can trade in for other, higher-value coins. They may make trades with the money in the “bank,” the pile next to the coffee can. Players who wish to trade in coins should do so only during one of their own turns, so they may explain their trades to the rest of the group.
  5. When time is called, players should take turns counting their money aloud.
  6. When everyone has had a chance to share their coin combinations, they should complete the “Coin Combos Tally Sheet” (page 4).

Enrichments/Extensions

  • The game can be made more difficult, with students reaching higher money amounts by using two dice instead of one, and/or increasing playing time.
  • The game could be played until a certain amount of money has been reached, instead of for a designated amount of time.
  • The teacher may wish to change the meaning of the Golden Dollar. For example, collecting a Golden Dollar could mean that the player must forfeit all of his coins, the player takes the coins of the person next to him, the player takes the coins of any other person in the circle, etc.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for multiplication and division and use these combinations to mentally compute related problems, such as 30 × 50;
  • develop fluency in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate the results of whole-number computations and to judge the reasonableness of such results;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate computations involving fractions and decimals in situations relevant to students' experience;
  • use visual models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to add and subtract commonly used fractions and decimals; and
  • select appropriate methods and tools for computing with whole numbers from among mental computation, estimation, calculators, and paper and pencil according to the context and nature of the computation and use the selected method or tools.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • understand various meanings of multiplication and division;
  • understand the effects of multiplying and dividing whole numbers;
  • identify and use relationships between operations, such as division as the inverse of multiplication, to solve problems; and
  • understand and use properties of operations, such as the distributivity of multiplication over addition.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • understand the place-value structure of the base-ten number system and be able to represent and compare whole numbers and decimals;
  • recognize equivalent representations for the same number and generate them by decomposing and composing numbers;
  • develop understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes, as parts of a collection, as locations on number lines, and as divisions of whole numbers;
  • use models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to judge the size of fractions;
  • recognize and generate equivalent forms of commonly used fractions, decimals, and percents;
  • explore numbers less than 0 by extending the number line and through familiar applications; and
  • describe classes of numbers according to characteristics such as the nature of their factors.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • understand various meanings of addition and subtraction of whole numbers and the relationship between the two operations;
  • understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers; and
  • understand situations that entail multiplication and division, such as equal groupings of objects and sharing equally.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • count with understanding and recognize "how many" in sets of objects;
  • use multiple models to develop initial understandings of place value and the base-ten number system;
  • develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections;
  • develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers;
  • connect number words and numerals to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations; and
  • understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.

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