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Summary

Students will sequence key events to understand the cultures of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag. Students will research the two groups, create timelines, and deliver class presentations.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coin

Objectives

  • Students will sequence key events in the settlement of Plymouth to gain an understanding of the cultures of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag.
  • Students will use Web sites and texts to research the two groups, create timelines, and deliver class presentations to deepen their understanding of the cultures.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Seventh grade
  • Eighth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Five
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Timelines
  • Multimedia presentations

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Treaty
  • Alliance
  • Puritan settlers
  • Massasoit
  • Plymouth
  • Diplomacy

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • “2011 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Background Information” page
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Looking Back” worksheet
    • “Key Events” worksheet
    • “Tying the Pieces Together” worksheet
    • “Timeline Rubric”
  • Copies of texts that include general information about the Puritan settlers at Plymouth, such as:
    • The Plymouth Colony (We the People) by Andrew Santella
    • Plymouth Colony: The Pilgrims Settle in New England (Building America) by Kathleen Tracy
    • Why Did the Pilgrims Come to the New World? And Other Questions About the Plymouth Colony (Six Questions of American History) by Laura Hamilton Waxman
  • Copies of texts that include general information about the New England Native Americans, such as:
    • The Wampanoag by Laurie Weinstein-Farson
    • Native Americans of the Northeast by Stuart A. Kallen
    • The New England Indians: An Illustrated Source Book of Authentic Details of Everyday Life by C. Keith Wilbur
  • Chart paper
  • Large sheets of paper or one large roll of paper
  • Markers, crayons, colored pencils

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following:
    • “Looking Back” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Key Events” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Tying the Pieces Together” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Timeline Rubric” (1 per student)
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • “2011 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Background Information” page
  • Locate Web sites and age-appropriate texts that give additional information about the cultures of the Puritan settlers at Plymouth and the Wampanoag (see examples under “Materials”).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/125.pdf.

Sessions 1 and 2

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program to the students for background information.
  2. Display the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency or photocopy. Tell the students that “reverse” is another name for the back of a coin, and “obverse” is another name for the front.
  3. Ask the students to examine the reverse of the coin and tell you what they see in the image. List their responses on chart paper.
  4. Discuss with the students the image and the inscriptions on the coin and the theme of diplomacy and treaties with tribal nations.
  5. Explain that the ability to make peace was important to the Native Americans. In order to ensure peace, Native Americans often made a “treaty”—an agreement—for peace between two groups. Native Americans often made agreements with other tribes and with settlers. Negotiating treaties between groups is called “diplomacy.”
  6. Display the first section of the “Background Information” page and discuss it with the students. Record vocabulary words and key points on chart paper for later reference.
  7. Divide the class in half to evenly represent the Puritan settlers and the Wampanoag tribe.
  8. Distribute the “Looking Back” and “Key Events” worksheets to each student. Have the students write “Puritan” or “Wampanoag” on the “group” line of the “Looking Back” worksheet.
  9. Discuss the directions and explain to the students that they will be researching key events and pieces of information that relate to either the Puritans or the Wampanoag. They will use their research and background information to create a timeline. Remind the students they can use available resources such as texts or bookmarked Internet sites. They will record their responses on the “Looking Back” and “Key Events” worksheets.
  10. Allow the students time to research using available resources.
  11. Collect the “Looking Back” and “Key Events” worksheets.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Display the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency. Review with the students the material covered in the previous sessions.
  2. Redistribute the “Looking Back” and “Key Events” worksheets.
  3. Have the student discuss their findings in pairs within their group (Puritans or Wampanoag).
  4. Distribute and discuss the “Timeline Rubric” with the students.
  5. Distribute a large sheet of paper to each pair. Have each pair create a timeline that displays key events in the lives of its group, either the Puritans or the Wampanoag, following the criteria of the rubric.
  6. Provide sufficient time for the students to complete their timelines and present them to the class.

Session 5

  1. Display the “2011 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency and the word chart from Session 1. Review the material covered in the previous sessions.
  2. Discuss with the students why it’s important to understand the cultures and key events of both the Puritans and the Wampanoag leading up to the treaty of 1621. Responses should include that knowing the cultures and events help us understand each group’s challenges and why the treaty was so important to them both.
  3. Display and discuss the second half of the “Background Information” page with the students.
  4. Distribute the “Tying the Pieces Together” worksheet. Have the students complete the worksheet based on class discussions and their research.
  5. Collect all of the worksheets and display the timelines in the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to create the timeline on a smaller scale and cut out images to illustrate it.
  • Allow students to dictate their written responses.
  • If there is difficulty finding credible resources specific to the Wampanoag, allow students to research other tribes in the New England region during this time period, or other important tribal nation treaties.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students research other historical treaties and present them to the class.
  • Have the students write a newspaper article about the 1621 treaty.

Use the students’ class participation, worksheets, rubric, and final products to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.7 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.7.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
    • Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
    • Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.
    • Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.
  • SL.7.2. Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
  • SL.7.3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.8 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.8.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
    • Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
    • Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas.
    • Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
  • SL.8.2. Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.
  • SL.8.3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.7 Language
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.7.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.
    • Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.
    • Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.
  • L.7.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt).
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.8 Language
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.8.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences.
    • Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.
    • Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.
  • L.8.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break.
    • Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.7 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.7.1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.7.2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RI.7.3. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.8 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.8.1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RI.8.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RI.8.3. Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.