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The Lovely Long E

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Summary

Students will identify words containing the long “e” vowel sound. Students will distinguish between words being formed with “ee” or “ea” to make the long “e” vowel sound.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coin

Objectives

  • Students will identify words containing the long “e” vowel sound.
  • Students will distinguish between words being formed with “ee” or “ea” to make the long “e” vowel sound.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

  • Basic phonic sounds
  • Vowel identification

Terms and Concepts

  • Iroquois
  • Tree
  • Rules
  • Community
  • Respect

Materials

  • 1 overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • “2010 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Peace Story” worksheet
    • “Long E in Pictures” worksheet
    • “Long E” worksheet
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • Crayons
  • Tape
  • Glue
  • Index cards

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “2010 Native American $1 Coin” page
    • “Peace Story” worksheet
    • “Long E in Pictures” worksheet
  • Make a copy of the “Peace Story” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Make a copy of the “Long E in Pictures” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Make a copy of the “Long E” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Create a T-chart on chart paper using markers. Label the columns “Tree” (underline the letters “ee”) and “Peace” (underline the letters “ea”).
  • Use ten index cards to create long “e” flash cards. On each of five of the index cards, write one word that uses the long e vowel pair “ee” (such as bee, knee, three, green, feet, sheep, seed, sleep) and underline the letters “ee.” On each of the other five cards write one word that uses the long e vowel pair “ea” (such as tea, bean, heat, beach, clean, wheat) and underline the “ea” pair. Attach a small piece of folded tape to the back of each index card so students can stick them onto the T-chart.
  • Set aside crayons, glue, scissors, and pencils for each student.
  • Create an area in the classroom (wall space or bulletin board) dedicated to the long “e” vowel sound. Label the area with the heading “Long e” or “/e/” or both. Place long “e” vowel sound words, vowel combinations, and associated worksheets in this space. Add to the area throughout the year.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/126.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
  2. Display the “2010 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front. With the students, examine the coin design. Tell the students the image on the coin’s obverse is Sacagawea, the young Shoshone Indian woman who traveled with and helped Lewis and Clark to explore the territory called “Louisiana.” The baby she carries on her back was the youngest member of the party. He was born during the expedition.
  3. Insert description of coin design and describe the 2010 theme of “The Great Tree of Peace” using age-appropriate description and definitions.
  4. Display the “Peace Story” transparency and distribute a “Peace Story” worksheet to each student. Read the worksheet to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary. Have the students follow along.
  5. After completing the “Peace Story,” display the “tree” and “peace” T-chart. Ask the students to identify the two words. Make a connection to the coin design and concepts learned from the read-aloud story by asking the students what vowel sound they hear. Guide the class to identify the long “e” vowel sound in each word.
  6. Explain to the students that the long “e” vowel sound can be made by the vowel combination “ee,” as in the word “tree,” or the vowel combination “ea,” as in the word “peace.”
  7. Hold up each of the index flash cards and ask the students to say each word aloud. Assist the students in sounding out each of the words.
  8. As a class, identify the long “e” vowel sound and ask the students whether the “ee” or “ea” vowel combination is used. Invite students to come up and stick the index card onto the chart under the appropriate column based on the vowel combination used.
  9. After placing all of the index cards in each column, review the chart with the class.

Session 2

  1. Review the information from the previous lesson about peace and the 2010 Native American $1 Coin design theme.
  2. Display and review the chart with the long “e” vowel combinations “ee” and “ea.”
  3. Display the “Long E in Pictures” worksheet overhead transparency. Review each of the pictures with the students and identify as a class the long “e” vowel sounds by saying the name of each picture aloud.
  4. Display the “Long E” overhead transparency. Explain to the students that they will cut out each picture from the “Long E in Pictures” worksheet and glue it into the appropriate box on the “Long E” worksheet. Explain that each box has the word of the picture written out for the students to trace. Review which vowel pairs (“ee” and “ea”) make the long “e” vowel sound. Allow the students appropriate time to cut, paste, trace, and color each of the boxes.
  5. Display the completed worksheets in the classroom in a space dedicated to the long “e” vowel sound.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work with a scribe to complete a sentence.
  • Have materials pre-cut and assembled.
  • Provide students with prompts to choose from and create a sentence (a word bank).

Enrichments/Extensions

Introduce the “ie/ei” long “e” vowel sound. Create a classroom chart with three columns labeled “Tree,” “Peace,” and “Chief.” Have students post words using the long “e” vowel sound under the correct word associations. Add to your chart throughout the year and introduce additional vowel sound groupings as the year continues.

Use the students’ class participation and worksheets to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RF.K Reading: Foundational Skills
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Phonological Awareness
Standards:

  • RF.K.2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
    • Recognize and produce rhyming words.
    • Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
    • Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.
    • Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme (consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.1 (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
    • Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RF.K Reading: Foundational Skills
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Phonics and Word Recognition
Standards:

  • RF.K.3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.
    • Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.
    • Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).
    • Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.