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Musician Extraordinaire

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Summary

Students will understand the role of a musician, composer and conductor.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • DC and Territory Quarters

Objectives

Students will understand the role of a musician, composer, and conductor.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Music
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Music
  • Famous Americans

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Territory
  • Capital
  • Jazz
  • Musician
  • Composer
  • Conductor
  • Performer

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Great American: Duke Ellington” worksheet
  • Copies of the following:
    • “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Great American: Duke Ellington” worksheet
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about Duke Ellington, such as:
    • Duke Ellington The Piano Prince And His Orchestra by Andrea Davis Pinkney
    • Duke Ellington by Mike Venezia
    • Duke Ellington: Jazz Composer by Judy Monroe
  • Chart paper
  • Markers, pencils, crayons

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Great American: Duke Ellington” worksheet
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” page (1 per student)
    • “Great American: Duke Ellington” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Locate a text that gives information about Duke Ellington (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Locate recordings of music composed and performed by Duke Ellington.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/139.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Quarters Program® for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state’s or territory’s quarter. Locate the District of Columbia on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. Ask the students what they know about the District of Columbia. Tell the students that it is the capital of the United States. Many famous Americans have lived andworked in the District of Columbia.
  3. Display the “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” overhead transparency. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front. With the students, examine the coin design. Ask the students what they think the phrase “Justice for All” means. Explain to the students that “Justicefor All” means fair treatment for everyone.
  4. Ask the students if they know who the person is on the quarter reverse. IdentifyDuke Ellington as a great American musician who grew up in the District of Columbia.
  5. Write the word “Musician” at the top of the chart paper. Ask the students what a musician is. Tell the students a musician is someone who performs, composes, or conducts music. Write “Performer,” “Composer,” and “Conductor” on the chart paper. Ask the students for a definition of each word. Explain to the students that a performer is someone who makes the music with their voice or an instrument. Acomposer is someone who writes the music. A conductor is someone who leads and directs a group of musicians in performing together. Write the definitions on the chart paper.
  6. Discuss with the students what objects each of these types of musician might use to create music. For example, a performer would use a microphone or musical instrument to create music. A composer would use a pencil or computer to write the musical notes to be performed. A conductor might use a baton to direct the musicians in playing together. On the chart paper, draw a small image of an object each musician might use next to (or under) the appropriate word.
  7. Explain to the students that a musician can do some or all of these things. A musician could be someone who only performs music, or performs and composes, or composes and conducts, or they could do all three. Explain to the students that Duke Ellington composed, conducted, and performed music.
  8. Discuss different types of music. Tell the students Duke Ellington was a jazz musician. Explain to the students that jazz music started in the United States. Tell the students that jazz music is often lively, exciting, and easy to dance to. Play a portion of a lively Duke Ellington jazz song for the students. While listening to the music, have the students use different hand motions to portray composing, conducting, and performing the music.
  9. Distribute the “District of Columbia Quarter Reverse” worksheet. While listening to a Duke Ellington song, have the students draw on the back of the worksheet what the music makes them think of and how the music makes them feel. Allow appropriate time for the students to color the worksheet.
  10. Display the worksheets in the classroom.

Session 2

  1. Review the information from the previous session about the District of Columbia and Duke Ellington, including the definition of a musician on the chart paper.
  2. Introduce the students to the selected text about Duke Ellington. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about Duke Ellington. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  3. Have the students share with a partner one thing they learned about Duke Ellington. Then ask the pairs to share their answers with the group. Record all acceptable responses in a web format on the chart paper.
  4. Display the transparency of the “Great American: Duke Ellington” worksheet. Read the directions to the students. Distribute the “Great American: Duke Ellington”worksheets.
  5. Allow them an appropriate amount of time to complete the worksheet.
  6. Share the worksheets with the class.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work with a scribe.
  • Allow students to work with a partner.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create a picture of what they think a Duke Ellington song would look like if it was a picture while they listen to the song.
  • Have students create a jazz song of their own. Have students perform the songs for the class.
  • Have students create musical instruments from everyday materials (shoebox guitar,cardboard tube kazoo).
  • Have students research other well-known jazz performers.

Use the students’ class participation, anecdotal notes, and worksheets to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.1.7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • RL.1.8. Not applicable to literature.
  • RL.1.9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.1.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.1.5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.1.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.K.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.K.5. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
  • W.K.6. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
  • RL.K.6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).  
  • RL.K.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.K.9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Music
Cluster: Standard 2: Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students perform on pitch, in rhythm, with appropriate dynamics and timbre, and maintain a steady tempo
  • Students perform easy rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately and independently on rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic classroom instruments
  • Students perform expressively a varied repertoire of music representing diverse genres and styles
  • Students echo short rhythms and melodic patterns
  • Students perform in groups, blending instrumental timbres, matching dynamic levels, and responding to the cues of a conductor
  • Students perform independent instrumental parts (e.g., simple rhythmic or melodic ostinatos, constrasting rhythmic lines, harmonic progressions, and chords) while other students sing or play contrasting parts

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Music
Cluster: Standard 7: Evaluating music and music performances
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students devise criteria for evaluating performances and compositions
  • Students explain, using appropriate music terminology, their personal preferences for specific musical works and styles