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Isle of Shapes

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Summary

Students will identify basic geometric shapes and differentiate between two-dimensional(flat) and three-dimensional (solid) shapes.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • DC and Territory Quarters

Objectives

Students will identify basic geometric shapes and differentiate between two-dimensional (flat) and three-dimensional (solid) shapes.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math
  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of shapes.

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Territory
  • Island
  • Sentry box
  • Enchanted
  • Geometry
  • Two-dimensional (flat) shapes
  • Three-dimensional (solid) shapes

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse” page
    • “United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide
    • “Puerto Rico Map”
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Classroom of Shapes” worksheet
    • “So Many Shapes!” worksheet
    • “United States and Territories Map” from the DC and Territories Resource Guide
    • “Puerto Rico Map”
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about Puerto Rico, such as:
    • Puerto Rico A to Z by Jeff Reynolds
    • Puerto Rico by Elizabeth Zapata
    • Puerto Rico: The People and Culture by Erinn Banting
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about basic shapes, such as:
    • Shape of Things by Dayle Ann Dodds
    • The Shape of Me and Other Stuff by Dr. Seuss
    • Round Is A Mooncake: A Book of Shapes by Roseanne Thong
    • When a Line Bends… A Shape Begins by James Kaczman
    • Cylinders Around Town by Nathan Olson
  • Chart paper
  • Markers, pencils, crayons
  • Examples of cylinders (such as food cans, oatmeal boxes, or potato chip containers)
  • Overhead markers

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse”
    • “United States and Territories Map” from the DC and Territories Resource Guide
    • “Puerto Rico Map”
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse” (1 per student)
    • “Puerto Rico Map” (1 per student)
    • “United States and Territories Map” from the DC and Territories Resource Guide (1 per student)
    • “Classroom of Shapes” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “So Many Shapes!” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Locate a text that gives information about Puerto Rico (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Locate a text that gives information about shapes (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Gather examples of a cylinder for Session 2.
  • Create a T-chart for Session 2 with drawings of shapes in one column and a blank second column for students’ examples.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/140.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Display the “United States and Territories Map” overhead transparencies as you explain to the students that the United States is made up of fifty states, five territories, and the District of Columbia, which is the nation’s capital. When defining “US territory” (lowercase “t”) for your students, the United States Mint recognizes and uses the Department of the Interior’s definitions found at www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/political_types.htm. Add your definition to the chart paper.
  2. Describe the District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarters Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state’s or territory’s quarter. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse,” mentioning that an image must be specially chosen to be on a quarter. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front. Locate Puerto Rico on the overhead transparency and the classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  3. Tell the students that Puerto Rico is an island. Define “island” as land surrounded entirely by water and add the definition to the chart paper along with a visual cue.
  4. Introduce the students to the selected text on Puerto Rico. Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations about Puerto Rico.
  5. Read the text. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  6. After the reading, review the image on the coin. Ask the students why the images may have been chosen for the coin and why they may be important to Puerto Rico.
  7. Explain that the symbols on the coin represent things that are important to the people of Puerto Rico. Explain that the sentry box is a small shelter for a guard ora soldier who keeps watch over a camp or building. Tell the students that in San Juan the sentry boxes were built along with walls of stone to protect the capital city from attacks by sea. The flower is the hibiscus, which grows in Puerto Rico. Add the definitions and a visual cue to the island chart paper. The inscription Isla del Encanto means Island of Enchantment, in Spanish, which is how many people refer to Puerto Rico. Ask the students why that may be a good nickname for Puerto Rico.
  8. Distribute a “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse” worksheet to each student. Direct the students to color the image. Have the students draw and write about their favorite thing they learned about Puerto Rico on the other side of the worksheet.
  9. Review the worksheets as a class and collect them.

Session 2

  1. Introduce the students to the selected text on shapes. Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations about shapes.
  2. Read the text. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  3. After the reading, display the T-chart on shapes. Ask the students to identify the shape and give some examples of shapes that they see in the classroom. Record student responses in the second column of the chart paper and label the corresponding shape.
  4. Display the “Puerto Rico Quarter Reverse” overhead transparency. Review the image on the coin. Ask the students what shapes they see in the image. Introduce the students to the term “cylinder.” Explain that a cylinder is a three-dimensional, or solid, shape. Display the examples of a cylinder that you collected. Ask the student which image on the coin has the shape of a cylinder.
  5. Discuss the other images on the coin and the shapes they represent. Outline the shapes on the image with colored overhead markers to highlight the shape for the students.
  6. Review the shape chart from earlier in the session. Ask the students what shapes they see in the classroom (such as a circular clock and rectangular door).
  7. Distribute a “Classroom of Shapes” worksheet to each student.
  8. Direct the students to choose one thing in the classroom of each shape and draw it in the box next to the corresponding shape.
  9. Allow an appropriate amount of time for them to complete this activity.
  10. Review the worksheets as a class and collect them.

Session 3

  1. Review the previous sessions and discussions on shapes. Display the shape chart from Session 2.
  2. Tell the students that now they are going to play the “Body Shapes Game” in small groups by making the shape you call out with their bodies. Make room for this activity if necessary. Divide the class into small groups. Once you are done playing the “Body Shapes Game,” distribute the completed “Classroom of Shapes” worksheets and a “So Many Shapes” worksheet to each student.
  3. Direct the students to draw a picture using shapes and label each shape. They may use the pictures that are on the “Classroom of Shapes” worksheet or come up with new ones.
  4. Allow an appropriate amount of time for them to complete this activity.
  5. Review the worksheets as a class, then collect and display them.
  6. Review shapes as a class.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Allow students to use a scribe to label their worksheets.
  • Allow students to use pattern blocks or cut-out shapes to complete their worksheets.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create three-dimensional shape pictures.
  • Have students research other territories and what buildings and structures may be unique to them.
  • Have students go on a nature walk to find shapes in their environment.
  • Have students further explore shapes using tangrams.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
  • Evaluate the students’ worksheets for understanding of the lesson objectives.
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.G Geometry
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes
Standards:

  • K.G.4. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (eg, number of sides and vertices/"corners") and other attributes (eg, having sides of equal length).
  • K.G.5. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (eg, sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.
  • K.G.6. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.
    • For example, "Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?"

Discipline: Math
Domain: 1.G Geometry
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Reason with shapes and their attributes
Standards:

  • 1.G.1. Distinguish between defining attributes (eg, triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (eg, color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.
  • 1.G.2. Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
  • 1.G.3. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters and use the phrases half of, fourth of and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Geometry
Cluster: Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical arguments about geometric relationships.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • recognize, name, build, draw, compare, and sort two- and three-dimensional shapes;
  • describe attributes and parts of two- and three-dimensional shapes;
  • investigate and predict the results of putting together and taking apart two- and three-dimensional shapes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Culture and Cultural Diversity
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand and apply the concept of culture as an integrated whole that governs the functions and interactions of language, literature, arts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behavior patterns
  • enable learners to analyze and explain how groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns
  • guide learners as they predict how experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference
  • encourage learners to compare and analyze societal patterns for transmitting and preserving culture while adapting to environmental and social change
  • enable learners to assess the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups
  • have learners interpret patterns of behavior as reflecting values and attitudes which contribute to or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding
  • guide learners in constructing reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent human issues
  • have learners explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from anthropology and sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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