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Transport, Past and Present

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Summary

Students will describe different modes of transportation from the past and present.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • DC and Territory Quarters

Objectives

Students will describe different modes of transportation from the past and present.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Compare and contrast
  • Venn diagram

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Territory
  • Island
  • Transportation

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • “Guam Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” worksheet
    • 1 copy of the “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” worksheet
    • 1 class map of the world that shows Guam
  • Collection of books about past and present transportation such as:
    • Boat by Eric Kentley
    • Amazing Boats by Margarette Lincoln
    • Flying Machine by Andrew Nahum
    • Eureka! It’s an Automobile! by Jeanne Bendick
    • Transportation: From Cars to Planes by Gare Thompson
    • Ships Through Time by Roy Richards
    • Amazing Cars by Trevor Lord
  • Image of a Flying Proa
  • Chart paper
  • Markers, pencils, crayons
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Butcher paper
  • White drawing paper
  • Paints
  • Paint brushes

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Guam Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” worksheet
    • Make copies of the “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” worksheet (1 per student)
    • Locate an image of a Flying Proa
    • Make a Venn diagram labeled “Transportation Past and Present”

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/141.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarter Program® for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state’s or territory’s quarter. When defining “US territory” (lowercase “t”) for your students, the United States Mint recognizes and uses the Department of the Interior’s definitions found at www.doi.gov/oia/Islandpages/political_types.htm. Locate Guam on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. Display the “Guam Quarter Reverse” overhead transparency. Tell the students that the back of a coin is also called the reverse, and the “obverse” is another name for the front. With the students, examine the coin design. Explain that the items on the coin are special to the people of Guam. Identify the Latte (pronounced “lattie”) as a sacred marker or monument. It is a symbol of the Chamorro people (also spelled CHamorro and Chamoru), a group of people who live on the island of Guam. Tell the students the inscription means “Guam, Land of the Chamorro.”
  3. Focus the student’s attention on the image of the boat. Ask the students if they can tell you what it is. Display the image of the Flying Proa. Tell the students this is a special type of boat built by the Chamorro people a long time ago called a Flying Proa. The Chamorro people are proud of the Flying Proa because it shows they work very carefully and they like to explore new places.
  4. Tell the students that the Chamorro people long ago used the Flying Proa to get from one place to another. Ask the students if they can think of another way to say something happened a long time ago. Write the word “Past” on the chart paper and include the definition.
  5. Write the word “Present” on the chart paper. Ask the students what the “present” means. Tell the students the word “present” can have more than one meaning. Tell the students one meaning of the word “present” is what is happening right now. Add the relevant definition for the word “present” to the chart paper.
  6. Tell the students what you use to go from one place to another is a type of transportation. Write the definition for “transportation” on chart paper.
  7. Brainstorm with the students different types of transportation (such as a boat, car, plane, train, bicycle). Write the student’s responses on the chart paper.
  8. Display the Venn diagram Labeled “Transportation Past and Present.” Display the selected text images about transportation past and present. Discuss with the students what they notice about transportation from the past. Write the student’s responses on the Venn diagram.
  9. Display the selected text images about transportation in the present. Discuss with the students what is different about transportation today when compared with transportation from the past. Lead the students to discover present day transportation can be bigger, more comfortable, safer, and faster than transportation in the past. Add the student’s responses to the Venn diagram.
  10. Ask the students what is the same about transportation in the past and present. Add the student’s responses to the center of the Venn diagram.
  11. Display the “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” overhead transparency. Review the pictures of different types of transportation with the students.
  12. Distribute the “Boats, Cars, Trains, Planes” worksheets. Allow appropriate time for the students to complete the worksheets.
  13. Review the worksheets with the class. Display the worksheets in the classroom.

Session 2

  1. Review the charts and information from the previous session about Guam and past and present.
  2. Display the image of the Flying Proa. Review with the students the Flying Proa is an example of a form of transportation from the past. Discuss what a present-day Flying Proa would be.
  3. Review the selected text images about transportation past and present from Session 1. Explain to the students transportation from the past can still be used today. Ask the students for examples of types of transportation from the past that are still used today (such as a canoe, bicycle, propeller plane, and antique car).
  4. Tell the students they will be creating a class mural of past and present transportation. Divide the class into pairs. Have each pair select a type of transportation. One of the students should draw the past form of the mode of transportation they chose and the other student should draw its present form.
  5. Distribute a sheet of drawing paper to each student. Allow the students enough time to finish their pictures.
  6. Discuss with the class how the mural will be organized. Suggestions include: dividing the mural into sections two with the past transportation on one side and the present on the other; creating a Venn diagram mural with past and present transportationseparated and transportation from both categories in the middle; displaying each pairs’ drawings together; or randomly displaying the transportation on a scenic background.
  7. Create the mural. Review the mural with the class. Display the mural in the school cafeteria.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students work with a partner to complete the worksheet.
  • Provide pre-cut pictures for the students to paste onto the worksheet.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create a new form of transportation for the future.
  • Have students create a journal entry about an imaginary trip on a Flying Proa.

Use anecdotal notes and the students’ class participation and worksheets to evaluate whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Print/Non-print Texts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.