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Memorable Museums

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Summary

Students will be able to describe the impact of certain figures in United States history, including Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, and William Clark. Students will be able to describe the general features of a community as well as specific features of their own communities. Students will be able to write informative paragraphs.

Coin Type(s)

  • Nickel

Coin Program(s)

  • Westward Journey Nickel Series

Objectives

  • Students will be able to describe the impact of certain figures in United States history, including Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, and William Clark.
  • Students will be able to describe the general features of a community as well as specific features of their own communities.
  • Students will be able to write informative paragraphs.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies
  • Technology

Grades

  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 121-150 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

The students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Explorer
  • Nickel

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Monticello
  • Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery
  • Louisiana Purchase
  • Museum
  • Community
  • Placard

Materials

  • Copies of the worksheets attached to this lesson plan (see "Preparations")
  • Copy of the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Lesson Plan Resource Guide (available at www.usmint.gov/kids)
  • 1 overhead projector
  • Blank overhead transparencies
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • 1 copy of a text that gives basic information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition (see "Preparations")
  • Web sites that include basic information about artifacts collected by Lewis and Clark
  • Pictures of local museums (optional)
  • Pictures of the display in the entrance hall of Monticello
  • White drawing paper
  • Web sites that include basic information about the community
  • A reserved computer lab with Internet access

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following:
    • Going Along with Lewis and Clark by Barbara Fifer
    • A Picture Book of Lewis and Clark by David Adler
    • Lewis and Clark: Explorers of the American West by Steven Kroll
    • Lewis and Clark: Discover the Life of an Explorer by Trish Kline
  • Locate a text that gives basic information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition such as:
    • "Our Community" worksheet
    • "Memorable Museums" worksheet
    • "Return to Monticello Nickel Reverse" (from the Resource Guide)
    • "Return to Monticello Nickel Obverse" (from the Resource Guide)
    • "Journey of Lewis and Clark" map (from the Resource Guide)
  • Make overhead transparencies of the following:
    • "Researching Our Community" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Our Community Museum—Directions" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Our Community" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Memorable Museums" worksheet (2 per student)
  • Bookmark Web sites that include information about your community.
  • Gather some pictures of local museums (optional).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/171.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Display the "Return to Monticello Nickel Obverse" overhead transparency. Ask the students to identify the man on the coin. If necessary, identify him as Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States of America.
  2. Explain to the students that, early in our country’s history, President Thomas Jefferson sent a group of people who called themselves the Corps of Discovery to explore our western lands. Explain that the leaders of the Corps were named Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, and that they were soldiers assigned to be explorers. Briefly discuss other familiar explorers, such as Christopher Columbus, and the meaning of the term "explorer."
  3. Display the "Journey of Lewis and Clark" overhead transparency. Show the students the area that Lewis and Clark explored. Note the territory’s position in relation to your school’s location. Explain that our country was not always the same shape that it is today. Point out the section of the country that existed before the Louisiana Purchase, as well as Virginia, where Thomas Jefferson lived.
  4. Display the "Return to Monticello Nickel Reverse" overhead transparency. Explain to the students that this is Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s home in Virginia.
  5. Describe the mission of the Lewis and Clark Expedition: to explore the uncharted western part of North America that was acquired in the Louisiana Purchase. Briefly discuss the three main facets of the mission: to study the plants, animals, and land; to form relationships with American Indian tribes; and to search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean.
  6. Tell the students that Lewis and Clark collected many items during their journey, which they sent back to President Jefferson. Ask the students to brainstorm what kinds of items they think may have been collected during the journey. List all the student ideas on chart paper titled "Expedition Objects." Explain that some of the objects were artifacts and write the definition of "artifact" (a man-made object from a particular place or time period) on the chart.
  7. Introduce the students to the selected text about Lewis and Clark. As a group, preview the text. Ask the students to listen carefully for information about any artifacts or special items that were collected during the expedition. Read the text aloud to the class. Attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts. During the reading, add objects mentioned in the text to the chart. After reading the text, ask the students to continue brainstorming items that the Corps of Discovery may have collected during their journey and add these items to the chart.
  8. Ask the students to think about what might have been done with all of these collected items, and why Thomas Jefferson would have wanted them. Display images from the bookmarked Web sites on a classroom computer, or show pictures of the entrance hall at Monticello that emphasize the objects collected during the expedition.
  9. Discuss museums, their purpose (to acquire, study, exhibit, and teach about important objects), what can be found in museums (objects that have scientific, historical, or artistic value), and how museums are designed (to make it easy for people to visit and learn about the objects). Tell the students that, to educate visitors, museums also provide information explaining each object. This information is often written on display items called "placards." Discuss or share pictures of museums the students may have visited or with which they may be familiar. Discuss the different kinds of museums—such as natural history, art, space—and what kind of items would be found in each. Show pictures of a few objects in museums and the information contained on their placards. Highlight the type of information usually included on a placard (such as names, dates, history, and present and future status of the object).
  10. Tell the students that they will create a mini-museum of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
  11. Display the overhead transparency of the "Memorable Museums" worksheet. Review the directions. Have each student choose one object from the chart created while the story was read. Distribute one "Memorable Museums" worksheet to each student (the second copy will be used in Session 4). Have the students draw their chosen object on white paper and create a placard for it using the "Memorable Museums" worksheet.
  12. After allowing enough time for the students to finish, collect the drawings and "Memorable Museums" worksheets. 13.Display the students’ work in the classroom. If space allows, set aside a specific area for the display and label it the "Lewis and Clark Expedition Mini-Museum."

Session 2

  1. Review the material covered in the first session, including the purpose and design of museums. Revisit the chart of objects from the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Ask the students to share the objects they chose to write about.
  2. Explain to the students that they will create a museum of their community as a class project. The purpose of this museum will be for others to learn about their community, as they themselves learned about the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
  3. Ask the students to brainstorm about communities, what makes a community, and what can be found in most communities. List the students’ responses on a piece of chart paper titled "Communities." Through these responses, guide the students to realize that a community is "a place where people live, work, play, and learn." Write this definition on the chart.
  4. Display the overhead transparency of the "Our Community" worksheet. Explain to the students that they will write about and draw specific things from their community that fall into each category to help them get ready for creating the community museum. Distribute the "Our Community" worksheets to the students and give them sufficient time to complete the task.
  5. Have the students share some of the things they wrote about on the "Our Community" worksheets. List these items on a larger class chart divided into the four categories.
  6. Distribute the "Our Community Museum—Directions" worksheets. Go over the direc-tions and explain to the students that they will be bringing in pictures of objects and artifacts from their community over the coming week. Discuss some appropriate ex-amples to find from each category in the form of photos (their own or from newspapers), brochures, post cards, or their own drawings. Examples:
    • Live: Apartment buildings, retirement communities, neighborhoods, military housing
    • Work: Local companies, businesses, community volunteers
    • Play: Playgrounds, parks, driving ranges, boating docks, recreation centers
    • Learn: Local schools, colleges, community classes, museums
  7. As the students start to bring in pictures, invite the students to briefly share about the artifacts and how they represent the community.

Session 3

  1. Review material covered in the first two sessions, including the purpose and design of museums and the plan for the community museum.
  2. Take the students to the computer lab to conduct further research on their community using bookmarked Web sites. Distribute the "Researching Our Community" worksheets. Have the students look for information about their community in the categories "live," "work," "play," and "learn," as well as historical information. The students should use the "Researching Our Community" worksheets to record their findings. If pictures can be printed, they can also be used as artifacts for the museum. Depending on technology available and the students’ ability, the Internet research can be done as a whole group, in pairs, or independently.
  3. Provide other research materials for the students to study as well, including books and brochures about the community and historical information.

Session 4

  1. Explain to the students that they will be creating museum placards for the artifact pictures they have collected, in the same style they used for the Lewis and Clark Expedition Mini-Museum. Review the kind of information usually contained in a placard with the students. Distribute a "Memorable Museums" worksheet to each student. Have each student use the worksheet to create a rough draft of a placard for an artifact they brought to class. The placard should be written as an informative paragraph.
  2. When the students finish their draft, have them meet with a partner to edit each other’s drafts. Allow time for the students to complete this task.
  3. Have the students write their final placards to be mounted on construction paper and displayed with the artifacts. The final copies can be produced on the computer if desired.
  4. Display the artifacts with the placards in the "community museum" and have the students share their work and artifacts with the class, as Thomas Jefferson shared Lewis and Clark artifacts with friends who visited Monticello. Discuss the importance of museums and review why it was important for Lewis and Clark to gather artifacts and to share their findings.
  5. Invite other students to visit the class’s "community museum."

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Provide pictures of community objects for students to write about.
  • Allow students to work in pairs for the writing assignments.
  • Allow students to dictate information for their museum placards.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Share with the students Web sites that include basic information about objects collected by Lewis and Clark.
  • Have students create brochures for the "community museum."
  • Have students invite visitors to the community museum as the students serve as tour guides.
  • Invite a guest speaker to share information about the community.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
  • Evaluate the students’ understanding of communities through participation in class discussions, completion of the "Our Community" worksheet, and informative paragraphs.
  • Assess understanding of artifacts through the materials the students choose to bring to class.
  • Evaluate the students’ placards for inclusion of key information about and importance of the Lewis and Clark objects and of their chosen community artifacts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.2.4. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.
  • RL.2.5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action.
  • RL.2.6. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.2.1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RL.2.2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral.
  • RL.2.3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.2.7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
  • RL.2.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.2.9. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.2 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.2.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
    • Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).
    • Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves)
    • Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).
    • Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).
  • L.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
    • Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage --> badge; boy --> boil).
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.2.1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.2. Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • RI.2.3. Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.2.7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
  • RI.2.8. Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
  • RI.2.9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.2.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
  • RI.2.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
  • RI.2.6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.2.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • W.2.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.2.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.2.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.2.5. With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • W.2.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Research and Information Fluency
Cluster: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks
  • Process data and report results

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • help learners understand the concepts of role, status, and social class and use them in describing the connections and interactions of individuals, groups, and institutions in society
  • help learners analyze groups and evaluate the influences of institutions, people, events, and cultures in both historical and contemporary settings
  • help learners to understand the various forms institutions take, their functions, their relationships to one another and how they develop and change over time
  • assist learners in identifying and analyzing examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and efforts of groups and institutions to promote social conformity
  • help learners to describe and examine belief systems basic to specific traditions and laws in contemporary and historical societies
  • challenge learners to evaluate the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change
  • guide learner analysis of the extent to which groups and institutions meet individual needs and promote the common good in contemporary and historical settings
  • assist learners as they explain and apply ideas and modes of inquiry drawn from the behavioral sciences in the examination of persistent social issues and problems

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features