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Beyond Louisiana

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Summary

Students will understand the challenges that faced the United States as a new nation, especially those related to exploration, expansion, and international affairs. Students will understand the chronology of events related to the expedition of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery. Students will understand that events often have multiple, interrelated causes. Students will organize information using concept maps.

Coin Type(s)

  • Nickel

Coin Program(s)

  • Westward Journey Nickel Series

Objectives

  • Students will understand the challenges that faced the United States as a new nation, especially those related to exploration, expansion, and international affairs.
  • Students will understand the chronology of events related to the expedition of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery.
  • Students will understand that events often have multiple, interrelated causes.
  • Students will organize information using concept maps.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Technology

Grades

  • Ninth grade
  • Tenth grade
  • Eleventh grade
  • Twelfth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery
  • Research skills using the Internet
  • Citation styles

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Concept mapping
  • Charles Wilson Peale
  • Georges Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon
  • Impressment
  • Jay’s Treaty
  • Neutrality
  • Northwest Passage
  • American Philosophical Society
  • Barbary Wars
  • Chesapeake Leopard Affair
  • Embargo Act
  • Quasi-War
  • Treaty of Greeneville
  • XYZ Affair

Materials

  • 1 copy of the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Lesson Plans Resource Guide (available at www.usmint.gov/kids)
  • Copies of the worksheets attached to this lesson plan (see "Preparations")
  • 1 overhead projector
  • Blank overhead transparencies
  • Chart paper and markers
  • A reserved computer lab with Internet access
  • Web sites that include basic information about Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, Lewis and Clark, and current events
  • About 30 index cards per student

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following:
    • "Westward Journey Nickel Series" worksheet (from the Resource Guide) (1 per student)
    • "Concept Map" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Persuasive Essay Rubric" (1 per student)
    • "Persuasive Essay Question" worksheet (1/2 sheet per student)
  • Make overhead transparencies of the following:
    • "Westward Journey Nickel Series" worksheet
    • "Concept Map" worksheet
    • "North America, 1803" map
    • "Persuasive Essay Rubric"
  • Arrange to use the school computer lab for two sessions.
  • Bookmark Web sites that include basic information about Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, Lewis and Clark, and current events.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/197.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Display the "Westward Journey Nickel Series" overhead transparency. Distribute one "Westward Journey Nickel Series" and one "Concept Map" worksheet to each student.
  2. Explain to the students that the United States Mint is producing the Westward Journey Nickel Series in honor of the bicentennial anniversary of the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the Corps of Discovery. Tell the students that the "Westward Journey Nickel Series" worksheet contains images of the nickels from this series.
  3. Ask the students to begin the worksheet by recording what they see in each nickel’s design that relates to the Corps of Discovery. Ask the students to hypothesize why each image was selected and its relationship to the Corps of Discovery. If desired, allow the students to use their textbooks. Ask the students to record their answers on their "West- ward Journey Nickel Series" worksheet.
  4. Allow the students five to ten minutes to complete the worksheet individually. Pair up the students and allow them to collaborate for an additional five to ten minutes.
  5. Lead a class discussion regarding the students’ answers on their "Westward Journey Nickel Series" worksheets. Use the students’ responses to complete a model worksheet on the overhead transparency. Ensure that the students have a basic understanding of Lewis and Clark’s Expedition.
  6. Ask the students to recall the goals of the Expedition. Guide the students to conclude that the purpose of the Expedition was to explore the area called "Louisiana," purchased from France in 1803.
  7. Display the "North America, 1803 Map" overhead transparency. Note the boundaries of Louisiana and the route of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Ask the students to hypothesize why Lewis and Clark traveled far beyond the boundaries of the area purchased as Louisiana.
  8. List all of the students’ responses on chart paper.
  9. Tell the students that major events rarely have one singular cause or purpose. Explain that many events can be traced back to several causes or circumstances that intersected at a particular time. Give examples familiar to the students from American history or current events. Tell the students that they will spend the next two class sessions investigating the historical context around the expedition of Lewis and Clark and evaluating all of the reasons for the expedition. Tell the students that they will create a concept map in order to demonstrate their conclusions. Explain to the students that they will use their concept maps to assist them with an in-class essay-writing assignment.
  10. Explain to the students that concept maps visually represent items of knowledge and their relationships. Explain that, before they create the actual concept map, they will create a practice map. Display the "Concept Maps" overhead transparency and distribute one copy of the map to each student. Review the concept map with the students.
  11. Direct the students to create a concept map. Ask them to choose a topic with which they are familiar. It could be academic or personal. Tell them to begin creating their concept map in class and complete the assignment for homework.
  12. Tell the students that the following class session will be held in the computer lab.

Session 2

  1. Collect the students’ homework.
  2. Distribute one "People, Events, and Ideas" worksheet to each student. Explain to the students that the worksheet contains a list of people, events, and ideas that are related to the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Their assignment is to identify each one, determine its impact on the Expedition, and devise a concept map demonstrating the reasons for the Expedition.
  3. Tell the students that you have bookmarked Web sites to help them with their research. Direct the students to record the information using one index card for each item on the list. Direct the students to cite the sources for all information. Review citation styles if necessary.
  4. Circulate among the students and provide support. Five minutes before the end of the class session, tell the students to continue their research for homework and remind them that they are to complete their research during the next class period.

Session 3

  1. Briefly review the goals of the assignment and answer any of the students’ questions. Allow the students to continue researching.
  2. Once the students have completed their research, direct the students to begin developing their concept maps using their index cards.
  3. Remind the students that their concept maps are to be completed for homework and are due the following class period. Remind the students that they will use their concept maps to complete an in-class writing assignment during the next class session and that they should also bring looseleaf notebook paper for the assignment. Display the "Persuasive Essay Rubric" overhead transparency. Briefly review the rubric so that the students understand the next session’s in-class writing assignment.

Session 4

  1. Direct the students to retrieve their concept maps, several sheets of looseleaf notebook paper, and a pen.
  2. Tell the students that they will write a persuasive essay using their concept maps as a resource. Explain that they have entire class period to complete the assignment. Suggest that the students use the five-paragraph essay format, including an introduction with a thesis statement, three supporting paragraphs, and a conclusion. Distribute a copy of the "Persuasive Essay Question" worksheet to each student.
  3. Five minutes before the end of the class session, have the students turn in their essay and the concept maps.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in small groups. Suggest that the group divide the items on the "People, Events, and Ideas" worksheet among themselves to create a single concept map.
  • Allow the students to complete their essay at home.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create their concept maps using hypermedia or concept mapping software applications.
  • Have students create a concept map illustrating the impact of Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery.
  • Use the student’s responses on the "Westward Journey Nickel Series" worksheet to assess the students’ daily progress.
  • Evaluate the student’s essay against the rubric to assess the overall achievement of the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.9-10 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.9-10.7. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.
  • RI.9-10.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
  • RI.9-10.9. Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (e.g., Washington’s Farewell Address, the Gettysburg Address, Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, King’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”), including how they address related themes and concepts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.9-10 Language
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.9-10.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use parallel structure.
    • Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.
  • L.9-10.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
    • Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.9-10 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).
  • RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
  • RI.9-10.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.11-12 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.11-12.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • RI.11-12.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • RI.11-12.3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.11-12 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
  • RI.11-12.5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
  • RI.11-12.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.11-12 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • RI.11-12.8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).
  • RI.11-12.9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.9-10 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.
  • SL.9-10.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
  • SL.9-10.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 9–10 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.9-10 Writing
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10.)
  • W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.9-10 Writing
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.9-10.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • W.9-10.8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
  • W.9-10.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    • Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]”).
    • Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning”).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.9-10 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
    • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
    • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
    • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
  • SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.
  • SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.11-12 Writing
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.11-12.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 
  • W.11-12.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. 
  • W.11-12.6. Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.11-12 Language
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.11-12.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time and is sometimes contested.
    • Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, Garner's Modern American Usage) as needed.
  • L.11-12.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation and spelling when writing. 
    • Observe hyphenation conventions.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.11-12 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.11-12.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 11-12 topics, texts and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
    • Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines and establish individual roles as needed.
    • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence, ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue, clarify, verify or challenge ideas and conclusions and promote divergent and creative perspectives.
    • Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, synthesize comments, claims and evidence made on all sides of an issue, resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
  • SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data. 
  • SL.11-12.3. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis and tone used.  

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.11-12 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.11-12.4. Present of information, findings and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed and the organization, development, substance and style are appropriate to purpose, audience and a range of formal and informal tasks. 
  • SL.11-12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning and evidence and to add interest. 
  • SL.11-12.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.11-12 Writing
Grade(s): Grades 9– 10
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including self-generated questions) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. 
  • W.11-12.8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation. 
  • W.11-12.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research. 
    • Apply grade 11-12 reading standards to literature (e.g., "Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics").
    • Apply grade 11-12 reading standards to literary non-fiction (e.g., "Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal US texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in US Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]".

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.