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Wow! Water, Trees, Fish!

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Summary

Students will identify natural resources. Students will describe what the world would be like without natural resources.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will identify natural resources. Students will describe what the world would be like without natural resources.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Science
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Environment
  • Nature
  • Mountain

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Natural resources
  • Industry

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • “Washington Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Washington Quarter Obverse” page
  • 1 overhead transparency of the “No Water, No Trees, No Fish…Oh My!” worksheet
  • “No Water, No Trees, No Fish!” worksheet
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about natural resources, such as:
    • Paper, Paper Everywhere by Gail Gibbons
    • My First Book of How Things Are Made by George Jones
    • Water by Frank Asch
    • The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
  • Chart paper
  • Markers, pencils, crayons
  • Paper plates (white dinner size)
  • String or yarn (optional)

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Washington Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Washington Quarter Obverse” page
    • “No Water, No Trees, No Fish!” worksheet
  • Make copies of the “Wow! No Water, No Trees, No Fish!” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Locate a text that gives information about natural resources (see examples under “Materials”).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/205.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. With the students, examine the design on this coin’s reverse. Tell the students that the back of the coin is also called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front of the coin.
  2. Ask the students to define the term “natural resources.” Make a list of responses on a Tchart, with one heading “Natural Resources” and the other heading “Uses.”
  3. Explain to the students that a natural resource is something from nature that people and animals can use. Have students give examples of natural resources and list them on another piece of chart paper. Discuss why they think they are important and what their uses are.
  4. Introduce the students to the selected text on natural resources. Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations about natural resources.
  5. Read the text. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  6. After the reading, discuss natural resources again and examples of resources and uses they found in the text. Add the information to the “Uses” column on the T-chart.
  7. Explain to the students that they will be designing a coin that shows a natural resource from a place you know on the obverse and its uses on the reverse (for example, a tree on one side and a piece of paper on the other). Distribute the paper plates for students to use as their coins.
  8. Share with the class.
  9. Display the “coins” as appropriate.

Session 2 and 3

  1. Review the “Natural Resources” chart from the previous session.
  2. Review the 50 State Quarters® Program. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “Washington Quarter Reverse” page, mentioning that an item must be special to be on a quarter. Locate Washington on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  3. Read the coin inscriptions to the class. Explain to the students that Washington is called “The Evergreen State” because of its many forests. Show them the date at the top of the coin and tell them that is the year that Washington became a state and it is the only state to be named after a president.
  4. Discuss the other images on the coin. Tell the students that the salmon on the coin represents the fishing industry, which is very important to Washington. The mountain in the background is Mount Rainier, which can be seen from points in eastern and western Washington and that the salmon spawn throughout the Columbia River. Explain to the students that the design of the coin was chosen because it represents all of the state of Washington.
  5. Tell the students that Washington has many natural resources, but the coin only depicts several of them. Lead the students in a discussion to identify some examples (trees, water, land, fish, air, etc.). Discuss what some of the uses of these resources may be and list responses on chart paper.
  6. Model what life would be like without trees. Ask the students how we would get paper if there were no trees, and how we would do our work with no paper. Encourage them to think of how they would draw a world without trees (for example, sad birds with no home, no shade, no paper, no houses because there is no wood).
  7. Discuss with the students what would be different if we didn’t have the resources on the list.
  8. Review the natural resource chart from the previous session. Distribute the “Wow! No Water, No Trees, No Fish!” worksheet and explain to the students that they are to choose three of the natural resources from the chart and illustrate what it would be like without them.
  9. Allow appropriate amount of time to complete the assignment. Share with the class.
  10. Review why natural resources are important and why it is important to take care of them.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Provide cutouts of natural resources labeled with their names and uses.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students explore natural resources from their home state and illustrate their uses.
  • Have students think of other ways to use some common natural resources.
  • Have students add captions to their “Wow! No Water, No Trees, No Fish!” worksheets.
  • Use the students’ worksheets to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.K.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them).
  • W.K.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.K.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.1.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
  • W.1.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.1.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.K.4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RI.K.5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
  • RI.K.6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).
  • RI.K.8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.K.9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.1.7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • RI.1.8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.1.9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Science
Domain: K-4 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

  • Personal health
  • Characteristics and changes in populations
  • Types of resources
  • Changes in environments
  • Science and technology in local challenges

Discipline: Science
Domain: K-4 Content Standards
Cluster: Science as Inquiry
Grade(s): Grades K–4
Standards:

  • Ability necessary to do scientific inquiry
  • Understand scientific inquiry