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It’s Time to Rhyme

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Summary

Students will identify and create rhyming words.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will identify and create rhyming words.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of rhyming skills.

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Rhyme

Materials

  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that relates to rhyming words or pairs, such as:
    • Daddy Is a Doodlebug by Bruce Degan
    • Pigs by Roseanne Williams
    • Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? by Eric Carle
    • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Eric Carle
    • Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? by Eric Carle
    • The Flea’s Sneeze by Lynn Downey
    • The Itsy Bitsy Spider by Rosemary Wells
    • Ten Little Monsters by Jonathan Emmett
    • Clickety Clack by R. and A. Spence
  • Magnetic letters
  • 1 overhead projector
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Florida quarter reverse
  • Copies of the “Color the Rhymes” page
  • Trays or baggies
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Crayons
  • Copies of the “Rhyming Pictures” chart
  • 1 overhead transparency of the “Rhyming Pictures” page
  • White unlined paper (cut into 5” squares)
  • Chart paper
  • Markers

Preparations

  • Locate an appropriate text that relates to rhyming words or pairs (See examples under “Materials”).
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Florida quarter reverse.
  • Make copies of the “Color the Rhymes” page (1 per student).
  • Prepare a tray or baggie for each student with scissors, glue, and crayons (1 per student).
  • Make copies of the “Rhyming Pictures” chart (1 per student).
  • Make an overhead transparency of the “Rhyming Pictures” page.
  • Cut the white unlined paper into 5” squares (1 per student).
  • Make a three-column chart on chart paper.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/223.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Select a book about rhyming, specifically one that stresses end-rhymes. Introduce students to the selected text. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what might be occurring at different points in the book.
  2. Read the selected text aloud to the class. As you read, leave the rhymes open so that students can create the second word in a rhyming pair (ex.: “Johnny went to the pet store with Nat. Johnny told Nat that he wants a ___________.”). Or, challenge students to raise their hand when they hear a pair of words that rhyme. During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  3. Identify rhyming pairs. Have students say each rhyming pair aloud several times.
  4. After reading the book, ask students to guess what the word ‘rhyme’ means. Provide examples of rhyming words and as a class create a list of rhyming pairs on chart paper.
  5. Play a game with students where you place magnetic letters on the overhead projector. Spell out the word “CAT”. Have students say the word aloud. Remove the “C” and ask students to say the remaining sound (“AT”) aloud. Add the letter “B” to spell “BAT”. Have students say the word aloud. Remove the “B” and replace with other appropriate letters to create other rhyming words.
  6. Continue this game using other rhymes, such as: -op, -ag, -ut.

Session 2

  1. Revisit with students the concept of rhyme and the rhyming pairs from yesterday’s game.
  2. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the Florida quarter reverse. Locate Florida on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  3. Have students identify what objects they see on the Florida coin. Guide students to respond: ship, space ship, and land. On the 3-column chart paper, label one column “SHIP”, one column “SPACE”, and one “LAND”, drawing pictures next to each word.
  4. Distribute one “Color the Rhymes” page to each student and one tray or baggie of materials to each group.
  5. Have students identify what they see in each picture. Read the word under each picture for the students and ask the students to say each word aloud.
  6. Direct students to color each of the pictures, then cut them apart.
  7. Distribute a “Rhyming Pictures” chart to each student. Have students practice sorting their pictures by rhyming sounds. They can practice several times, race a friend, or try to beat the teacher in correctly sorting the pictures.
  8. To check for student comprehension, use the overhead transparency of the “Rhyming Pictures” chart to review the sort.
  9. Direct students to glue all of the pictures into the appropriate columns on their charts.
  10. Distribute the 5-inch squares to students.
  11. Revisit the transparency (or photocopy) of the Florida quarter reverse. Remind students that this quarter represents a state.
  12. As a class, generate a list of words that rhyme with the word “state” on chart paper. Include pictures with each word.
  13. Direct students to select a word from the list. On his or her square, have each student draw a picture of his or her chosen word. Direct students to label their pictures.
  14. Invite students to share their pictures with a partner and say aloud each rhyming pair.

Differentiated Learning Options

Struggling students can sort the pictures from the “Color the Rhymes” page with a partner after having sorted them individually.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • To extend this activity, have students practice the same steps with their state quarter (if available). Other quarters that would work well with this activity are: Delaware, Georgia, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Kentucky, Tennessee, Maine, and Arkansas.
  • For continued practice creating rhyming pairs, cut out several pictures from a magazine, being sure to find pictures that rhyme. Label each picture. Mount each picture onto construction paper. Create a class center where students have to sort the pictures into rhyming pairs.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.1.4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
  • RL.1.5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.
  • RL.1.6. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.1.7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • RL.1.8. Not applicable to literature.
  • RL.1.9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.1 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.1.4. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • SL.1.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • SL.1.6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 1 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.K.4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
  • RL.K.6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).  
  • RL.K.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.K.9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.K Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.K.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • SL.K.2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.
  • SL.K.3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • SL.K.4. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
  • SL.K.6. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.