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Our States, My State

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Summary

Students will use a simple map to become aware of the physical shape of our nation and their home state. Students will also determine the location of states in relation to one another using north, south, east, and west.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will use a simple map to become aware of the physical shape of our nation and their home state.
  • Students will also determine the location of states in relation to one another using north, south, east, and west.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have basic knowledge of:

  • Cardinal directions
  • Map elements

Terms and Concepts

  • North
  • South
  • East
  • West
  • Compass rose
  • United States/state
  • Map key
  • Reverse (back)

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Louisiana quarter reverse
  • 1 class map of the United States of America
  • Copies of the “Our States, My State” map
  • Copies of “The Louisiana Quarter Reverse” outline
  • Colored pencils and/or crayons
  • Scissors

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “Our States, My State” map (1 per student).
  • Make copies of “The Louisiana Quarter Reverse” outline (1 per student).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/236.pdf.

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the enlargement of the Louisiana quarter reverse.
  2. Explain to students that the design was specially chosen to represent the state of Louisiana, its history, and its contribution to the United States of America.
  3. Ask students to identify objects they recognize on the coin reverse: the bird, the musical instrument, and the outline of the United States. When students point out the shaded area that marks the Louisiana Territory, explain that it was at one time not part of the United States, that it was added as our nation grew. Tell the class that they will be looking at a map to see what the United States has grown up to look like.
  4. Give each student an “Our States, My State” map. Also, pass out crayons or colored pencils.
  5. Refer to the enlargement of the Louisiana quarter reverse, pointing out the continental United States. Have students outline the border of the United States of America on their map. Indicate that the areas for Alaska and Hawaii are also part of the United States using a class map to illustrate this point. Using the same color, ask them to outline those two states as well.
  6. Have students trace the words for United States of America in the same color.
  7. On their map, have the students locate and point to Louisiana. (If the students are having difficulty, give them the hint: “What letter do you hear at the beginning of Louisiana?” Tell them that the state of Louisiana is shaped like that letter.) Check to make sure that all students have identified the state correctly.
  8. Choosing a second color, have the students outline and color Louisiana. Ask the students to color in the box next to the word “Louisiana” on the map key.
  9. Ask students to place a dot in the state where the school is located (if it is not Louisiana). Check the students’ maps for accuracy. Have students use a third color to outline and color that state.
  10. Have the students identify the first letter they hear in that state’s name. With the same color, have the students copy the spelling of the state’s name in the blank on the map key.
  11. Review the compass and work with students to determine whether Louisiana is north, south, east, or west of the state in which the school is located. (If the home state is Louisiana, choose another by asking students to name other states they have lived in or visited.) On the class map, locate some of these and help the class determine whether these states are north, south, east, or west of the school’s state.
  12. Pass out the “Louisiana Quarter Reverse” outline, one per student.
  13. Allow students to color and cut out the outline of the Louisiana quarter reverse.
  14. Display the students’ work on a class bulletin board.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students work in pairs to identify the United States and state outlines.
  • Make a literature connection to “map elements” by reading an appropriate text, such as Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney, or North, South, East, and West by Allan Fowler.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students create a mobile of state (or country) outlines with the state (or country) name neatly printed on the back. Use states (or countries) that they have lived in, were born in, have visited, where family members have been born or live, or that they have learned about.
  • Use a Venn diagram to compare the design of the quarter from their home state (if available) or another state to the design of the Louisiana quarter.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
Cluster: Geography
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • guide learners in the use of maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective
  • enable learners to use mental maps to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context
  • assist learners to analyze the spatial information about people, places, and environments on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand the physical and human characteristics of places
  • assist learners in developing the concept of regions as a means to interpret Earth’s complexity
  • enable learners to understand how culture and experience influence people’s perceptions of places and regions
  • provide learners opportunities to understand and analyze the physical processes that shape Earth’s surface
  • challenge learners to consider the characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems on Earth’s surface
  • guide learners in exploring the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand and analyze the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth’s cultural mosaics
  • have learners explore the patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth’s surface
  • enable learners to describe the processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement
  • challenge learners to examine how the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth’s surface; help learners see how human actions modify the physical environment
  • enable learners to analyze how physical systems affect human systems
  • challenge learners to examine the changes that occur in the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources
  • help learners to apply geography to interpret the past and present and to plan for the future
  • enhance learners’ abilities to ask questions and to acquire, organize, and analyze geographic information so they can answer geographic questions as they engage in the study of substantive geographic content

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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