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Mural Mania

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Summary

Students will learn about the state in which they live and create a mural to display symbols for their state.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will learn about the state in which they live and create a mural to display symbols for their state.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group

Terms and Concepts

  • Symbol
  • Physical features

Materials

  • Large white roll paper
  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Markers
  • Chart paper
  • “My State is Great!” work page (page 4)
  • “Create a Quarter!” work page (page 5)
  • A book about your state

Preparations

  • Find a book about your state, or research key facts about your state to discuss with the class.
  • Collect pictures of the state flower, tree, and bird, if not covered in the book (optional).
  • Copy “My State is Great!” work page (page 4), one per student.
  • Copy “Create a Quarter!” work page (page 5), one per student.
  • Spread roll paper out onto hard surface.
  • Hang chart paper for brainstorming (or use chalkboard).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/240.pdf.

  1. Discuss the meaning of the word “symbol” with students and show some examples. Tell students that you will be reading to them a book about their state and that they will be using information from the book to create symbols for their state.
  2. Read aloud a book about the state in which you live. (Or discuss key facts about the state, if an appropriate book is not available.) On chart paper, write down the different information mentioned in the state book. Ask students to think of ways to represent each piece of information with a picture or symbol.
  3. Hand out the “My State is Great!” work page (page 4) and have students complete it as a class, identifying other important information about the state that could be represented on the mural. Add these items to the chart, along with students’ ideas on how to represent each with a picture.
  4. Tell students that they will be making a mural to display the symbols they created. Discuss what a mural is and how to make one. Ask students to decide which symbol(s) they would like to add to the mural and assign tasks.
  5. Once students understand the project, send them to different spots on either side of the long roll paper (if your class is too big for all to work on it at once, break them up into groups and let them take turns, or create more than one mural). Assist students with their ideas and where to put their symbols on the mural.
  6. When the mural is finished, ask students to share with one another the work they did on the mural. Encourage them to explain the meaning of the symbols they drew. Hang the mural somewhere in the classroom or school where everyone will see and enjoy it!
  7. Hand out the “Create a Quarter!” work page (page 5). Have students design a quarter for their state on the work page.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Complete the mural activity for one of the states for which a quarter is being released in 2001.
  • Create a mural about the class. Students can add symbols to represent important things about themselves.
  • Ask students to design a quarter to represent their family.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.1.2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.1.3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.K.1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).
  • W.K.2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • W.K.3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.K.4. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RI.K.5. Identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book.
  • RI.K.6. Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts).
  • RI.K.8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.K.9. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.1.4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
  • RI.1.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • RI.1.6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.1.7. Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • RI.1.8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • RI.1.9. Identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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