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Quarter Sorter

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Summary

Students will use various sorting rules to sort 1999, 2000, and 2001 quarters and then graph their results.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will use various sorting rules to sort 1999, 2000, and 2001 quarters and then graph their results.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs

Terms and Concepts

  • Sort
  • Rule
  • Venn diagram
  • Graph

Materials

  • Two large pieces of yarn, each joined at the ends to make a circle
  • Index cards
  • “Quarter Sorter” work page (page 12)
  • Reproducible 50 State Quarters™ Program Coin Sheets (pages 29 and 30)
  • “Quarters Count!” work page (page 13)
  • Pencils
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Crayons or markers

Preparations

  • Copy, enlarge, cut out, and laminate 1999, 2000, and 2001 Reproducible 50 State Quarters™ Program Coin Sheets (pages 29 and 30, for class demonstration).
  • Copy 1999, 2000, and 2001 Reproducible 50 State Quarters™ Program Coin Sheets (pages 29 and 30), one set per student (for student activity).
  • Copy “Quarter Sorter” and “Quarters Count!” work pages (pages 12 and 13), one of each per student.
  • Place yarn circles on floor to make Venn diagram.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/242.pdf.

  1. Gather students on the floor, forming a circle around the Venn diagram.
  2. Introduce or review the purpose of the Venn diagram. Briefly explain that you will be using the Venn diagram to sort quarters.
  3. Lay the 15 enlarged quarters on the floor. Ask students what they notice about the quarters. Guide them in sharing details found on each quarter and determining characteristics that are the same and different between the quarters.
  4. Remind students that you will use the two circles of the Venn diagram to sort the quarters. Using a very simple sorting rule (e.g., People/No People or Trees/People), begin placing quarters in the Venn diagram.
  5. Invite volunteers to determine your sorting rule by asking, “Why have I placed these quarters in separate circles?” Continue adding quarters until a student volunteers, and then invite him/her to add another quarter to the diagram without explaining the rule. Have students continue to add quarters to the diagram until all of the quarters have been placed.
  6. When all quarters have been placed in the Venn diagram, call on a student to explain the rule. Write the categories on two index cards and place them next to the appropriate circles.
  7. Repeat steps 4, 5, and 6 as time allows, using different sorting rules. Allow students to invent rules and begin the Venn diagram.
  8. After several sorting rules have been discussed, assign partners and hand out the “Quarter Sorter” work page (page 12) and a copy of the 1999, 2000, and 2001 quarters sheets to each pair. Assign (or have students vote on) a rule they will use to sort their quarters and complete the work page. Students should label each circle with the appropriate rule, cut out quarters from the coin sheets, and paste them in the correct place on the Venn diagram.
  9. Hand out the “Quarters Count!” work page (page 13). You may need to review graphing if this concept is new for the students. As a class, count the number of quarters that fit the rules and ask them to color in that many blocks on their graph.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Students can sort other objects using Venn diagrams. Before labeling the diagram, they can challenge classmates or family members to figure out their sorting rules.
  • Students can practice graphing the results of their own sorting activities.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe and compare measurable attributes
Standards:

  • K.MD.1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
    • Describe several measurable attributes of a single object

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe several measurable attributes of a single object
Standards:

  • K.MD.2. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.
  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • discuss events related to students' experiences as likely or unlikely.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • pose questions and gather data about themselves and their surroundings;
  • sort and classify objects according to their attributes and organize data about the objects; and
  • represent data using concrete objects, pictures, and graphs.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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