skip navigation
Left Navigation Links

 

How Change Has Changed

Printable view

Summary

Students will create a timeline to show the sequence of change that the “tails” side of a quarter has gone through.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will create a timeline to show the sequence of change that the “tails” side of a quarter has gone through.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Math
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups

Terms and Concepts

  • Timeline
  • Sequence
  • Change

Materials

  • 50 State Quarters™ 1999-2000 quarter board provided by the U.S. Mint
  • “How Change Has Changed” worksheets (pages 20 and 21), one per student
  • Why Money Was Invented 4 by Neale S. Godfrey (optional)
  • Copies of the 2000 quarters (page 31), reduced 85%, one per student
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Chart paper
  • Markers

Preparations

  • Make an enlarged copy of the back of the quarter board showing the design types and changes of the U.S. quarter.
  • Make copies of the 2000 quarters (page 31), reduced 85%. Three rows of 2000 quarters will fit vertically on an 81⁄2” x 11” sheet of paper, and can be cut into strips to hand out to students.
  • Hang chart paper.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/246-251.pdf.

  1. Focus on the objective by asking: “Who can tell me something that they know of that has changed?” (Possible responses: babies to adults, puppies to dogs, tadpoles to frogs, caterpillars to butterflies.) List responses on chart paper.
  2. Explain that many things change naturally over time, such as people, animals, and insects.
  3. Discuss other changes of things from the past to the present, such as transportation and technology.
  4. Review the story, Why Money Was Invented 4, by Neale S. Godfrey, from lesson #2 (page 6). Discuss how our money system has changed over time.
  5. Display the quarter board, focusing on the back where the quarter visuals are located. Display an enlarged copy for better viewing.
  6. Explain that the design of the quarters has changed a lot since 1796. Tell students that they will be making their own timeline to show some of the changes that the “tails” of quarters have been through from 1796 until now.
  7. Distribute the “How Change Has Changed” worksheet (page 20) and a copy of the 2000 quarters.
  8. Have students cut out all the coins on the “How Change Has Changed” worksheet (page 20). Ask students to pick their favorite 2000 quarter and cut it out from the sheet provided.
  9. Supply students with the “How Change Has Changed” timeline (page 21). Ask them to glue each quarter in correct sequence. Spaces #1-6 are filled with quarters from the “How Change Has Changed” worksheet (page 20—each is numbered). Students should glue their favorite 2000 quarter in space #7.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Ask students to create a visual timeline based on their life using photographs and/or drawings. Have them share their timeline with the class.
  • Have students brainstorm a list of ideas for other timelines they could make.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.