skip navigation


Sign Up for E-mail Updates

Facebook Twitter Pinterest YouTube RSS
Left Navigation Links
Additional Links
Just For Kids! h.i.p. pocket change
Teacher's Network - Sign up today!

 

Looking at Landforms

Printable view

Summary

Students will understand that some natural resources are renewable and some are nonrenewable. Students will identify various landforms.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will understand that some natural resources are renewable and some are nonrenewable.
  • Students will identify various landforms.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Landforms
  • Environment
  • Desert
  • Natural resources
  • Hill
  • Plain

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Mountain
  • Plateau
  • Renewable
  • Nonrenewable
  • Mount Rainier

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector
  • 1 overhead transparency of the "Washington Quarter Reverse" page
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 overhead transparency of the "Name That Landform" worksheet
  • Locate a copy of a text that provides basic information about Mount Rainier and the state of Washington, such as:
    • A True Book Mount Rainier National Park by Sharlene and Ted Nelson
    • America the Beautiful: Washington by R. Conrad Stein
    • Portrait of America: Washington by Kathleen Thompson
    • Mount Rainier National Park: Realm of the Sleeping Giant by Tim McNulty
    • E is for Evergreen: A Washington State Alphabet by Roland Smith
  • Locate copies of texts that provide basic information about landforms, such as:
    • World’s Wonders: Landforms by Elizabeth Raum
    • Earth’s Land and Water by Bonnie Beers and Gail Suanders-Smith
    • Land by Emma Nathan
  • Copies of the "Name That Landform" worksheet
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • White construction paper
  • Pencils
  • Images of landforms
  • Large sheets of paper
  • Writing paper
  • Variety of art materials (markers, colored pencils, water colors and oil pastels)
  • Tape

Preparations

  • Make copies of the "Name That Landform" worksheet (1 per student).
  • Make an overhead transparency of the following:
    • "Washington Quarter Reverse" page
    • "Name That Landform" worksheet
  • Locate texts that give basic information about Mount Rainier and the state of Washington(see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate texts that give basic information about landforms (see examples under "Materials").
  • Gather images of various landforms found in the United States (mountain, plateau, hill,desert, and plain) to use in Session 2.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/259.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Display the "Washington Quarter Reverse" overhead transparency. Locate Washington on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. With the students, examine the design on this coin’s reverse. Tell the students that the back of the coin is also called the reverse, and "obverse" is another name for the front of a coin. Have the students identify the words and images in this coin design, including Mount Rainier, salmon, evergreens, and the words "The Evergreen State."
  3. As a class, discuss the images on the coin. Tell the students they represent important symbols of the state of Washington. Ask the students why they think that the images might be important to Washington, and accept all responses.
  4. Explain to the students that Washington is called "The Evergreen State" because of its many forests. Show them the date at the top of the coin and tell them that is the year that Washington became a state and it is the only state to be named after a president.
  5. Ask the students where you would find the items depicted on the coin. Student responses should include "in nature." Tell the students that the images are all examples of natural resources (things found in nature that are useful to people.) All of these images are part of the environment (water, air, soil, and living things around you.)
  6. On a piece of chart paper, have the students brainstorm a list of natural resources found in the environment.
  7. Explain to the students that some of the resources are renewable (can restore themselves) like fruit. Other natural resources are nonrenewable (cannot readily restore themselves) like oil. Review the list of natural resources on the chart paper. As a class, write "R" next to the ones that are renewable and "NR" next to those that are nonrenewable. Have the students talk about these natural resources and how people can use them.
  8. Tell the students that people often live where there are natural resources they can use. Display the "Washington Quarter Reverse" overhead transparency again and have the students look at the natural resources.
  9. Divide the class into small groups and give each group a piece of construction paper. Have them either write the words "Mount Rainier," "Salmon," or "Evergreens" at the top. There may be some repeats depending on the class size. Use examples from the renewable and nonrenewable chart as a model with the students.
  10. Have the students work together and decide if their group’s resource is renewable or nonrenewable and write down some ways people can use this natural resource.
  11. Introduce the students to the selected text about Mount Rainier and the state of Washington. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occur-ring at different points in the text. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  12. During the reading, add any other natural resources discussed in the text to the chart and decide whether these are renewable or nonrenewable.

Session 2

  1. Display the chart paper and review the material covered in the previous session.
  2. Display the "Washington Quarter Reverse" overhead transparency, pointing out Mount Rainier.
  3. Show the students pictures of various landforms (mountain, plateau, desert, hill, and plain) describing the unique details of each. Display them in the classroom.
  4. Distribute a "Name That Landform" worksheet to each student. Tell the students there are descriptions of landforms and a list of vocabulary words. They will be drawing a picture and writing a definition of each landform in the box that matches each word.
  5. Display the "Name That Landform" overhead transparency. As a class, read each vocabulary word and definition. Do the first one together.
  6. Have the students work independently to complete the worksheet. Review the answers as aclass.
  7. Divide the class into small groups of 3 or 4. Explain to the students that they will be creating a landform mural with a written description of each item. Tell the students to also include natural resources in the mural.
  8. As a class, discuss possible landforms and natural resources that could be included. Tell the students they will be writing descriptions of their mural in the next session. The students should draw the images with a pencil before adding color. ?
  9. Have a variety of art materials available such as markers, colored pencils, water colors, and oil pastels on a center table. Let each group decide which medium they will use forthe mural. Distribute large sheets of paper to each group.
  10. Allow the students sufficient time to create their mural.
  11. Set the murals aside to dry (if necessary) and collect the students’ worksheets.

Session 3

  1. Have the students get into their groups from Session 2. Distribute the murals and the "Name That Landform" worksheet to the students. Invite the students to briefly discuss their murals with the class.
  2. Distribute a piece of writing paper to each member of the group. Remind the students that they are individually writing to describe the landforms and natural resources they included in their mural.
  3. Display the charts as a reference for the students to use while writing.
  4. Have students write 5 or 6 sentences explaining what landforms and natural resources are shown in their mural.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to use a scribe for written responses.
  • Provide various pictures of landforms already labeled for the students.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Using classroom resources, have students locate examples of states that have landforms similar to the state of Washington.
  • Using modeling clay, invite the students to create mountains, plateaus, and hills explaining the differences and similarities of each.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
  • Use the students’ worksheets, paragraph, and mural to evaluate whether they have met the lesson’s objectives.
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.2 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
Standards:

  • L.2.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
    • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
    • Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known prefix is added to a known word (e.g., happy/unhappy, tell/retell).
    • Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., addition, additional).
    • Use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning of compound words (e.g., birdhouse, lighthouse, housefly; bookshelf, notebook, bookmark).
    • Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases.
  • L.2.5. Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe foods that are spicy or juicy).
    • Distinguish shades of meaning among closely related verbs (e.g., toss, throw, hurl) and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin, slender, skinny, scrawny).
  • L.2.6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using adjectives and adverbs to describe (e.g., When other kids are happy that makes me happy).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.3 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
Standards:

  • L.3.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
    • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
    • Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is added to a known word (e.g., agreeable/disagreeable, comfortable/uncomfortable, care/careless, heat/preheat).
    • Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., company, companion).
    • Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
  • L.3.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
    • Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in context (e.g., take steps).
    • Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., describe people who are friendly or helpful).
    • Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states of mind or degrees of certainty (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard, wondered).
  • L.3.6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic, and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and temporal relationships (e.g., After dinner that night we went looking for them). 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.2 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.2.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
    • Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).
    • Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves)
    • Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).
    • Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).
  • L.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
    • Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage --> badge; boy --> boil).
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.3 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
    • Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
    • Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).
    • Form and use regular and irregular verbs.
    • Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.
    • Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.
    • Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
    • Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
    • Use commas in addresses.
    • Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
    • Form and use possessives.
    • Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
    • Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.2 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.2.4. Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
  • SL.2.5. Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • SL.2.6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 2 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.3 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.3.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.
    • Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
  • SL.3.2. Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL.3.3. Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering appropriate elaboration and detail.
  • SL.3.4. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.
  • SL.3.5. Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details.
  • SL.3.6. Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 3 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.) 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.2.1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.2. Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • RI.2.3. Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.2.7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
  • RI.2.8. Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
  • RI.2.9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.2.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
  • RI.2.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
  • RI.2.6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.3.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
  • RI.3.5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • RI.3.6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.3.7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  • RI.3.8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
  • RI.3.9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • RI.3.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • RI.3.3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.2.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • W.2.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.2.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Research
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

The Department of the Treasury Seal