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Let’s Look at Legends

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Summary

Students will use a Venn diagram to compare two historical legends relating to volcanoes.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will use a Venn diagram to compare two historical legends relating to volcanoes.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Science
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Venn diagrams
  • Compare and contrast
  • Volcanoes

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Volcanoes
  • Legends
  • Venn diagram
  • Comparisons

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • Oregon quarter reverse page
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Lake Explosion page
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate legend about the creation of Crater Lake, such as:
    • Coyote in Love by Mindy Dwyer
    • Legends of Landforms: Native American Lore and the Geology of the Land by Carole Garbury Vogel
  • Variations on a Klamath Indian legend such as those available at:
  • Break It Down graphic organizer
  • Overhead transparency markers
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate legend about Hawaiian volcanoes, such as:
    • Volcanoes by Seymour Simon
    • The Volcano Goddess Will See You Now by Don Greenburg
    • Mt. Kilauea: Home of the Hawaiian Goddess of Fire by Kathy Furgang
  • Butcher paper

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “Break It Down” graphic organizer (1 per student).
  • Make an overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • Oregon Quarter Reverse page (or photocopy)
    • Lake Explosion page
    • Break It Down graphic organizer
  • Locate an age-appropriate text that relates to the creation of Crater Lake (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Locate an age-appropriate text that relates to Hawaiian volcanoes (see examples under “Materials”).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/272.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the Oregon quarter reverse. Locate Oregon on a classroom map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. With the students, examine the coin design. Have the students identify the images and writing in this coin design, including the words “Crater Lake,” the water, the trees, and the land.
  3. Ask the students why they think that this lake might be important to Oregon, and accept all responses.
  4. Ask the students how they think that this lake was formed. Display a copy of the “Lake Explosion” overhead transparency. Read the passage aloud, having the students follow along. Crater Lake is actually the deepest lake in the United States and one of the deepest lakes in the world. Scientists say that, a very long time ago, a volcano stood where Crater Lake is now.  The rocks deep in the ground under the mountain got very hot and pushed upward in an eruption. When the volcano erupted, the explosion was so great and threw out so much material that the mountain collapsed!  Once the eruption was over and the hot rocks (or lava) cooled off, the mountain looked like a deep bowl. Over the years, this bowl filled up with rain and melting snow, creating Crater Lake.
  5. Explain that many people had ideas about how this lake was originally formed. Tell the students that, long ago, people would often make up stories to explain things that they didn’t understand. They would tell these stories to explain things that occurred in nature like big storms and, in this case, volcanoes. Some of these stories are called “legends.” A legend is a story handed down from the past. The story can’t be proven, but it’s sometimes based on historical events.
  6. Introduce the students to the selected text. Explain that the story is an American Indian legend about how Crater Lake was formed. Explain that this legend comes from the American Indians who lived in the area in Oregon near where Crater Lake is located.  Preview the text and illustrations and allow students to generate observations and predictions about what is happening at each point in the text.
  7. Read the selected text to the class. Attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  8. After reading the selection, display the overhead transparency of the “Break It Down” graphic organizer.
  9. As a class, discuss how to organize information from the text into the different rows of the graphic organizer.
  10. Work with your students to complete the first column of the chart as a class.
  11. Before Session 2, fill in the chart and make copies.

Session 2

  1. Revisit the image of the Oregon quarter and ask the students to recall what they discussed relating to the coin’s design.
  2. Display the overhead transparency of the “Break It Down” graphic organizer complete with the information from the last session. Ask the students to recall the basic story that they heard about the creation of Crater Lake.
  3. Explain that today they are going to hear a legend about volcanoes that comes from a different group of people.
  4. Introduce the students to the selected text about Hawaiian volcanoes. Explain that this legend comes from the native people of Hawaii. Use a map of the United States and show the location of Hawaii. Preview the text and illustrations and allow the students to generate observations and predictions about what is happening at each point in the text.
  5. Read the selected text to the class. Attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  6. After reading the selection, distribute a copy of the “Break It Down” graphic organizer to each student.
  7. Divide the students into pairs and direct them to complete the second column of the chart based on the story that they just heard.
  8. As a class, discuss the legend that they heard about the Hawaiian volcanoes.
  9. As a group, complete the second column on the overhead transparency and direct the students to fill in their individual graphic organizers.

Session 3

  1. Display the overhead transparency of the “Break It Down” graphic organizer complete with the information from the first and second sessions.
  2. Introduce the students to the concept of a Venn diagram by drawing two interlocking circles on the chalk board. Explain that a Venn diagram is used to compare two things.
  3. Explain that the students will work with a partner to use a Venn diagram to compare the two stories that they heard. In the overlapping space, the students will record the similarities in the two stories. In the outer parts of the circles, the students will record the parts of the stories that are different.
  4. Explain that, rather than just writing about the similarities and differences between the two stories, the students will be creating an illustrated Venn diagram that they will share with the class. They will draw images to accompany the information that they included in the Venn diagram.
  5. Model writing a piece of information and then drawing a picture that relates to this story fact.
  6. Direct the students to pair up. Distribute a large piece of butcher paper to each pair of students.
  7. Allow an appropriate amount of time for the pairs to work on their Venn Diagrams and to present them to the class.

Differentiated Learning Options

Record the information paragraphs on tape for later use.

Enrichments/Extensions

Direct the students to examine other types of legends from around the world and make comparisons between these different stories. What differences do the students notice between legends that come from countries with different climates?

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.2.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • W.2.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • W.2.3. Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.2 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.2.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
    • Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).
    • Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves)
    • Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).
    • Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).
  • L.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
    • Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage --> badge; boy --> boil).
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.3 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
    • Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
    • Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).
    • Form and use regular and irregular verbs.
    • Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.
    • Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.
    • Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
    • Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
    • Use commas in addresses.
    • Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
    • Form and use possessives.
    • Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
    • Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.2 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.2.4. Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
  • SL.2.5. Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • SL.2.6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See grade 2 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.2.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • W.2.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.2.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.2.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.2.5. With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • W.2.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
  • W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
  • W.3.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3.)
  • W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3.)
  • W.3.6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Science
Domain: 5-8 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Personal health
  • Populations, resources, and environments
  • Natural hazards
  • Risks and benefits
  • Science and technology in society

Discipline: Science
Domain: 5-8 Content Standards
Cluster: Earth and Space Science
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Structure of the Earth system
  • Earth’s history
  • Earth in the solar system