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2002 State Flower Show

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Summary

Students will use logic, add amounts of money, and make change by using the information chart to solve problems.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will use logic, add amounts of money, and make change by using the information chart to solve problems.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Math
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • First grade
  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have basic knowledge of:

  • Using calculators with decimals
  • Addition and subtraction using dollar signs ($) and decimal points (.).
  • Estimating and rounding using money.

Terms and Concepts

  • State flowers
  • Interpreting data
  • Cost
  • Price

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Mississippi quarter reverse
  • “Flower Show Price List”
  • “Flower Show” worksheet
  • Index cards (1 per student)
  • Colored pencils and/or crayons
  • Drawing paper
  • Calculators (optional)

Preparations

  • Make copies of the “Flower Show Price List” (1 per student).
  • Make copies of the “Flower Show” worksheet (1 per student).
  • Prepare the index cards numerically showing various amounts of money (from $2.00 to $4.50 choosing increments appropriate for your class).
  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Mississippi quarter reverse.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/292.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information if necessary, using the example of your state if available. Then display the overhead transparency or photocopy of the Mississippi quarter reverse.
  2. Explain to students that the design was specially chosen to represent the state of Mississippi. Tell students that all states have state flowers and ask if students know what flower was chosen to represent their home state. (If the home state is Missis- sippi, give general examples of other states’ flowers.)
  3. Distribute the “Flower Show Price List” and the accompanying worksheet. Review the information that is given about each state on the price list.
  4. As a class, complete Part 1 of the “Flower Show Worksheet.” Solve each problem on the board, explaining and giving more examples of mathematical concepts when necessary.

Session 2

  1. Ask students to pretend that they will be constructing their own flower garden using the information they have about the state flowers. Have them choose two flowers from the list that they would like to buy. These may be the same type of flower. Direct them to record their choice in Part 2 of the “Flower Show Worksheet.”
  2. Put them into groups of two to four. Randomly pass out the index cards. Explain that this is the amount that they may “spend” on flowers and will be combined to create their group garden.
  3. Have students add up the group money and record this number in Part 2.
  4. As a group, have the students complete Part 3 on the “Flower Show Worksheet.”
  5. Check the worksheets for accuracy.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Ask students to graph the prices and values of each state’s flower.
  • Adjust the prices on the price list for your students’ level and put them on index cards.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students research the state flowers of their home state or another state that is meaningful to them. Have them create their own State Flower Show information and display their illustrations on a bulletin board.
  • Have students plant a class flower garden using their state flower, and chart the growth of each flower.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
Standards:

  • 2.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, eg, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Add and subtract within 20
Standards:

  • 2.OA.2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, eg, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for multiplication and division and use these combinations to mentally compute related problems, such as 30 × 50;
  • develop fluency in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate the results of whole-number computations and to judge the reasonableness of such results;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate computations involving fractions and decimals in situations relevant to students' experience;
  • use visual models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to add and subtract commonly used fractions and decimals; and
  • select appropriate methods and tools for computing with whole numbers from among mental computation, estimation, calculators, and paper and pencil according to the context and nature of the computation and use the selected method or tools.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • understand various meanings of multiplication and division;
  • understand the effects of multiplying and dividing whole numbers;
  • identify and use relationships between operations, such as division as the inverse of multiplication, to solve problems; and
  • understand and use properties of operations, such as the distributivity of multiplication over addition.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • understand various meanings of addition and subtraction of whole numbers and the relationship between the two operations;
  • understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers; and
  • understand situations that entail multiplication and division, such as equal groupings of objects and sharing equally.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • count with understanding and recognize "how many" in sets of objects;
  • use multiple models to develop initial understandings of place value and the base-ten number system;
  • develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections;
  • develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers;
  • connect number words and numerals to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations; and
  • understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • understand the place-value structure of the base-ten number system and be able to represent and compare whole numbers and decimals;
  • recognize equivalent representations for the same number and generate them by decomposing and composing numbers;
  • develop understanding of fractions as parts of unit wholes, as parts of a collection, as locations on number lines, and as divisions of whole numbers;
  • use models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to judge the size of fractions;
  • recognize and generate equivalent forms of commonly used fractions, decimals, and percents;
  • explore numbers less than 0 by extending the number line and through familiar applications; and
  • describe classes of numbers according to characteristics such as the nature of their factors.