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Great Graph!

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Summary

Students will compare sets of coins and determine which group is greater than, less than, or equal to the other according to the number and value of each set. Students will read and interpret a simple bar graph to answer questions.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will compare sets of coins and determine which group is greater than, less than, or equal to the other according to the number and value of each set.
  • Students will read and interpret a simple bar graph to answer questions. 

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have basic knowledge of:

  • Greater than (>), less than (<), and equal to (=).
  • Use of dollar sign ($), decimal point (.), and cent sign (¢).
  • Reading a bar graph
  • Using calculators with decimals

Terms and Concepts

  • Cent (penny)
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Greater than (>)
  • Less than (<)
  • Equal to (=)
  • Graph

Materials

  • The “Great Graph!” price list and worksheet
  • Set of edible items
  • Items to compare
  • Cents, nickels, dimes, and quarters
  • Calculators (1 per student, optional)

Preparations

Make copies of the “Great Graph!” price list and worksheet (1 set per student).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/293.pdf.

  1. Review the concepts and symbols of “greater than,” “less than,” and “equal to” by comparing different quantities of the same items (pencils, crayons, etc.). 
  2. Use a set of edible items such as cookies, and ask students to identify how many items are in each group.  Write these numbers on the board.
  3. Tell students that there is a way to show which group or number is larger.  Ask them which pile of food a really hungry person would want to eat.
  4. After students correctly identify the larger group, draw the greater than (or less than) symbol between the two numbers written on the board.  Point out to students how the symbol resembles the mouth of a hungry person eating the largest amount.
  5. Do several more sets of numbers for practice, varying the use of the “greater than” and “less than” symbols (also incorporate “equal to”).  Tell students that almost anything can be compared using this method—even money, specifically coins.
  6. Review the value of a cent (penny), nickel, dime, and quarter as a class.
  7. Introduce the “Great Graph!” worksheets.  Review the directions with the class and model using coins to determine the value of the penny column.
  8. Pass out coins and ask students to continue completing the worksheet in small groups or individually as modeled.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students orally answer and discuss the questions on the worksheet.
  • Allow students to use play money to represent the amounts in the graph.
  • Add sublines to the “Great Graph” worksheet to help students better read the graph.

Enrichments/Extensions

“What’s In My Pocket?”:  Students can take a poll of family members to record how much change is in their pockets, then construct their own graphs based on number of coins and total of each type.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Represent and interpret data
Standards:

  • 2.MD.9. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.
  • 2.MD.10. Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put together, take-apart and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
Standards:

  • 2.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, eg, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • discuss events related to students' experiences as likely or unlikely.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • pose questions and gather data about themselves and their surroundings;
  • sort and classify objects according to their attributes and organize data about the objects; and
  • represent data using concrete objects, pictures, and graphs.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • design investigations to address a question and consider how data-collection methods affect the nature of the data set;
  • collect data using observations, surveys, and experiments;
  • represent data using tables and graphs such as line plots, bar graphs, and line graphs; and
  • recognize the differences in representing categorical and numerical data.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • propose and justify conclusions and predictions that are based on data and design studies to further investigate the conclusions or predictions.