skip navigation


Sign Up for E-mail Updates

Facebook Twitter Pinterest YouTube RSS
Left Navigation Links
Additional Links
Just For Kids! h.i.p. pocket change
Teacher's Network - Sign up today!

 

Colonial Discovery

Printable view

Summary

Students will create a mural to tell the story of the 13 colonies and to display current state symbols of each of the 13 states.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will create a mural to tell the story of the 13 colonies and to display current state symbols of each of the 13 states.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs

Terms and Concepts

  • 13 colonies
  • Symbol
  • Mural
  • Research

Materials

  • Large roll paper, divided into 13 sections (or 13 pieces of poster board that can later be connected)
  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Markers
  • Chart paper
  • “Colonial Discovery” work pages (pages 16 and 17)
  • State Information Pages (pages 26 and 27)
  • A book that tells the story of the 13 colonies (to read aloud)
  • Reference books with information about the 13 colonies (for student research)
  • Almanac or other source of state symbol information

Preparations

  • Find a book(s) that relays a general history of the original 13 colonies.
  • Review state information and history about each of the 13 colonies.
  • Plan a library visit during which time students will research their assigned colony.
  • Make copies of “Colonial Discovery” work pages (pages 16 and 17).
  • Mark 13 sections on the large roll paper (or gather 13 pieces of poster board).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/297.pdf.

  1. Tell students that before there were books and libraries, people used murals to tell stories and record historical events for everyone in a community to see. Explain to students that they will be creating their own mural to tell the story of the original 13 colonies.
  2. Read aloud a story of the history of the original 13 colonies.  Review the history and discuss important events during this time.
  3. Brainstorm a list of symbols and information that might be important to include in a pictorial story about each colony/state. Record this list on chart paper. Explain that students will be working in small groups to create a pictorial history of one of the colonies.  Their work will be put together to create a mural of the original 13 colonies.
  4. After students are organized into their groups, allow them an opportunity to visit the school library to research and collect information about their colony/state. Instruct students to record information on the “Colonial Discovery” work pages (pages 16 and 17).
  5. Once research is complete, discuss with students how they could represent different types of information. Ask students to decide which symbol(s) and other historical information they would like to include in the section about their colony/state and help groups organize their information.
  6. Have students begin working on their portion of the mural.  The sections should be in order according to when each state was admitted to the Union.
  7. When each group is finished with their section of the mural, invite them to share their portion with the other groups.  Encourage them to explain the symbols and other information about their colony/state. Add any finishing touches to ensure continuity between each section.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students compare and contrast two or three different colonies/states.
  • Have students make murals to tell the story of their own lives.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Literature
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience. 

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students understand and use similarities and differences between characteristics of the visual arts and other arts disciplines
  • Students identify connections between the visual arts and other disciplines in the curriculum

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: K-4 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
Cluster: History
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners in utilizing chronological thinking so that they can distinguish between past, present, and future time; can place historical narratives in the proper chronological framework; can interpret data presented in time lines; and can compare alternative models for periodization
  • enable learners to develop historical comprehension in order that they might reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage, identify the central question(s) addressed in historical narrative, draw upon data in historical maps, charts, and other graphic organizers; and draw upon visual, literary, or musical sources
  • guide learners in practicing skills of historical analysis and interpretation, such as compare and contrast, differentiate between historical facts and interpretations, consider multiple perspectives, analyze cause and effect relationships, compare competing historical narratives, recognize the tentative nature of historical interpretations, and hypothesize the influence of the past; help learners understand how historians study history;
  • assist learners in developing historical research capabilities that enable them to formulate historical questions, obtain historical data, question historical data, identify the gaps in available records, place records in context, and construct sound historical interpretations
  • help learners to identify issues and problems in the past, recognize factors contributing to such problems, identify and analyze alternative courses of action, formulate a position or course of action, and evaluate the implementation of that decision
  • assist learners in acquiring knowledge of historical content in United States history in order to ask large and searching questions that compare patterns of continuity and change in the history and values of the many peoples who have contributed to the development of the continent of North America
  • guide learners in acquiring knowledge of the history and values of diverse civilizations throughout the world, including those of the West, and in comparing patterns of continuity and change in different parts of the world
  • enable learners to develop historical understanding through the avenues of
  • social, political, economic, and cultural history and the history of science and technology

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

The Department of the Treasury Seal