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Riddle Me Cents!

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Summary

Students will use logic, as well as their knowledge of coin values and history, to solve riddles.

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter
  • Half dollar
  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will use logic, as well as their knowledge of coin values and history, to solve riddles.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Math

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs

Terms and Concepts

  • Logic
  • Strategy

Materials

  • Cents, nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars, and Golden Dollars (real coins, play money, or paper coins copied from the reproducible coin sheets (pages 29-32))
  • “Riddle Me Cents!” work page (page 20)
  • “Use Your Quarters Sense” work page (page 21)
  • Chart paper

Preparations

  • If you are using paper coins, you will need to copy the reproducible coin sheets (pages 29-32), cut out coins, and laminate if possible.
  • Copy the “Riddle Me Cents!” (page 20) and “Use Your Quarters Sense”
    (page 21) work pages.
  • Copy the following riddles onto chart paper:
     
    • I am 3 coins.
      I have only 1 president.
      I am worth less than 30 and more than 3 cents.
      What am I? [ANSWER: 3 NICKELS]
       
    • I am a quarter from one of the first 5 states in the Union. There is a horse galloping across me!
      Who am I? [ANSWER: DELAWARE]

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/298.pdf.

  1. Gather students in a group and explain that they will solve riddles.  Each riddle provides hints about a specific group of coins or about a state quarter.
  2. Introduce students to the riddle concept with the following oral practice riddles:
    • I am 2 coins and I equal 10 cents. What am I? [ANSWER: 2 NICKELS]
    • I am 1 coin and I equal more than 75 cents. What am I? [ANSWER: GOLDEN DOLLAR]
    • I am the first state. Who am I? [ANSWER: DELAWARE]
  3. Display the two riddles on chart paper and invite volunteers to read them aloud.
  4. Prompt students to come up with ideas for solving the riddles by asking:
    “What could you use to help you figure out the answer?” “Will you need paper and pencil?” “Would coins be helpful?”  As these items are discussed, place them in front of the group where students will have access to them during independent work time.
  5. Allow students to work with a partner and utilize whatever materials they wish to solve the two riddles.  NOTE: Depending on skill level, students could work independently.
  6. As students work, visit each pair and invite them to share their strategies. The teacher’s role is not to show students how to solve the riddle, but rather to facilitate their thinking about how to solve the problem.
  7. When at least two students have finished, invite the students who have solved the riddles to share their strategies and show the group how they figured out the answer. Help clarify these strategies for the whole group, and invite others to share their methods, even if they have not completed their work.
  8. Distribute the “Riddle Me Cents” (page 20) and “Use Your Quarters Sense” (page 21) work pages and allow students time to work. Circulate and, when helpful, remind students of various strategies they could use to solve the problems.
  9. Bring the group back together and invite volunteers to share their strategies.

Enrichments/Extensions

Students can write their own riddles, exchange them with classmates, and challenge one another to solve them.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Add and subtract within 20
Standards:

  • 2.OA.2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, eg, by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 2.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
Standards:

  • 2.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, eg, by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for multiplication and division and use these combinations to mentally compute related problems, such as 30 × 50;
  • develop fluency in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing whole numbers;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate the results of whole-number computations and to judge the reasonableness of such results;
  • develop and use strategies to estimate computations involving fractions and decimals in situations relevant to students' experience;
  • use visual models, benchmarks, and equivalent forms to add and subtract commonly used fractions and decimals; and
  • select appropriate methods and tools for computing with whole numbers from among mental computation, estimation, calculators, and paper and pencil according to the context and nature of the computation and use the selected method or tools.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Communication
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication 
  • communicate their mathematical thinking coherently and clearly to peers, teachers, and others;
  • analyze and evaluate the mathematical thinking and strategies of others; and
  • use the language of mathematics to express mathematical ideas precisely.   

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.