skip navigation


Sign Up for E-mail Updates

Facebook Twitter Pinterest YouTube RSS
Left Navigation Links
Additional Links
Just For Kids! h.i.p. pocket change
Teacher's Network - Sign up today!

 

The Coin and the Fable

Printable view

Summary

Students will identify and apply the elements of fables, including the personification of animals, use of morals, and oral tradition.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will identify and apply the elements of fables, including the personification of animals, use of morals, and oral tradition.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Science

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Four
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • The writing process
  • Story elements
  • Character traits

Terms and Concepts

  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Fable
  • Moral
  • Personification
  • One dimensional

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Alaska Quarter Reverse” page
    • “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Fabled Chart” worksheet
    • “The Fable and the Organization” worksheet
    • “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • 1 copy of a text that contains fables. For example:
    • Aesop’s Fables illustrated by Fulvio Testa
    • Animal Fables from Aesop adapted by Barbara McClintock
    • Multicultural Fables and Fairy Tales by Tara McCarthy
  • Chart paper
  • Pictures of Alaska

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Alaska Quarter Reverse” page
    • “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Fabled Chart” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “The Fable and the Organization” worksheet (1 per student)
  • Gather texts that contain fables (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Gather pictures of Alaska

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/309.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “Alaska Quarter Reverse” page. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front of a coin. Locate Alaska on a classroom map.  Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. With the students, examine the Alaska quarter design. H ave the students identify the images and the writing included in this design.  Focus specifically on the grizzly bear and the salmon.
  3. Draw a picture of a bear and a fish on a sheet of chart paper.  Using the pictures as the center for two webs, have the students list characteristics of the two animals.
  4. Ask the students if they have ever read or heard a fable.  Record examples of fables they have heard on chart paper.  Explain that fables were originally told orally and were used to teach people morals or lessons. The fables would be repeated often. Eventually fables were written down.
  5. Introduce the selected text.  Explain to the students that fables are a special kind of story.  In fables, the characters are usually animals that act and talk like people. Discuss the term “personification” (animals or objects that act like people or exhibit human characteristics) and record the definition on chart paper. Ask the students for examples of personification they see on television, in movies, or in other literature.
  6. Explain that a fable teaches a moral or lesson about people and the way they should or should not behave. The moral is illustrated by what happens in the story.
  7. Distribute the “Fabled Chart” worksheet.  Read several (at least four) fables to the class.  During each reading, have the students fill in the chart for that fable. After reading each fable, have the students list characteristics of each animal in the fable on the chart paper.  Have the students work in pairs and discuss the moral with each other after each fable. Then have the students share their ideas about the moral and the rest of the chart with the class.
  8. Ask the students to identify the elements of a story (characters, setting, and plot). Explain to the students that fables have the same elements as other stories with the addition of the moral.  Explain that the characters in a fable are not as well devel­ oped as in other stories. The characters in a fable are more one-dimensional (for example, greedy or lazy). The animals used in the fable are usually chosen because they seem to represent a certain human trait (for example, the fox is usually sly, the lion is bold or courageous, the mouse is meek, the wolf is greedy or mean).

Session 2 and 3

  1. Review fables and the parts of a fable from the previous lesson using the worksheets from the previous day.  Review the meanings of “personification” and “moral.” Explain to the students that they will be using the writing process to write their own original fable. They will then be presenting their story in the oral tradition, by telling their story to the class.
  2. Distribute the “The Fable and the Organization” worksheet.  Refer back to the “Fabled Chart” worksheet and remind the students that what happens in the story reveals the moral, so they need to make the sequence of events clear to the reader or listener.  Remind the students that the characters in a story are usually animals and are usually one-dimensional.
  3. Display the transparency of the “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet and discuss it with the students.
  4. Display the transparency or photocopy of the “Alaska Quarter Reverse” page. Review the two animals on the coin.  Explain to the students that their fable will be about a grizzly bear and a salmon. They may add other animals if necessary to tell their story. The setting will be Alaska. Ask students what they know about Alaska and write their ideas on a web on the board.  Show the pictures of Alaska to generate more ideas to add to the web.
  5. Write some examples of morals on the board and discuss the meaning of each one with the students.  Some examples are
    • Haste makes waste.
    • Pride can lead to a downfall.
    • Pick on someone your own size.
    • You can’t judge a book by its cover.
  6. Ask the students for examples of other morals and add them to the list.  Explain to the students that it is usually easier to think of the moral you want to use first and then to work on your story.
  7. Allow students time to write their fables using the writing process.

Session 4

  1. Review fables and their oral tradition from the first session.  Distribute the “The Fable and the Rubric” worksheet.
  2. Have the students present their fables orally without stating the morals. After the student reads his or her fable, have the other students in the class guess the moral of the fable. When students are finished presenting, have them fill out the rubric. Collect the rubrics.
  3. Bind the student fables together into a class book.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Allow students to use illustrations when they read their fables orally.
  • Allow students to record or videotape themselves reading their fables.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have the students act out their fables.
  • Have the students illustrate their fables.

Use the “The Fable and the Rubric” to evaluate whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.5 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.5.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
    • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
    • Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
    • Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
  • W.5.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
    • Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
    • Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • W.5.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
    • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
    • Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
    • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.4 Language
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.4.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).
    • Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.
    • Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.
    • Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).
    • Form and use prepositional phrases.
    • Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
    • Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).
  • L.4.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use correct capitalization.
    • Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.
    • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
    • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.5 Language
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.5.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
    • Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.
    • Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.
    • Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).
  • L.5.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
    • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.
    • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
    • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
    • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.6 Language
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.6.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).
    • Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.
    • Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).
    • Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others' writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.
  • L.6.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.4 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • RL.4.5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking about a text.
  • RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.4 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.4.7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • RL.4.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.4.9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.4 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.
  • RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.5 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.5.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • RL.5.5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.
  • RL.5.6. Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.5 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.5.7. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
  • RL.5.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.5.9. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.5 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.5.1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.
  • RL.5.3. Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.6 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RL.6.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
  • RL.6.5. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
  • RL.6.6. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.6 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.6.7. Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.
  • RL.6.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.6.9. Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.6 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.6.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • RL.6.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
  • RL.6.3. Describe how a particular story’s or drama’s plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.4 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.4.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • W.4.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.
  • W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    • Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”).
    • Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Discipline: Science
Domain: K-4 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Personal health
  • Characteristics and changes in populations
  • Types of resources
  • Changes in environments
  • Science and technology in local challenges

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Science
Domain: 5-8 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Personal health
  • Populations, resources, and environments
  • Natural hazards
  • Risks and benefits
  • Science and technology in society

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

The Department of the Treasury Seal