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An Island Introduction

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Summary

Students will research and identify key geographical, cultural, and political concepts as they apply to Hawaii. Students will identify different types of maps.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

Students will research and identify key geographical, cultural, and political concepts as they apply to Hawaii.  Students will identify different types of maps.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Five
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Maps
  • Cardinal directions
  • Longitude and latitude

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Archipelago
  • Economic/Resource map
  • Topographic map
  • Obverse (front)
  • Hawaiian Islands
  • Physical map
  • Climate map
  • Reverse (back)
  • Political map
  • Road map

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • “Hawaii Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Map of Hawaii” page
    • “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet
    • “Map This!” worksheet
    • “Island Introduction” worksheet
    • “Island Introduction” rubric
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Hawaii Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Map of Hawaii” page
    • “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet
    • “Map This!” worksheet
    • “Island Introduction” worksheet
    • “Island Introduction” rubric
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Student World Maps with Longitude and Latitude shown
  • Various texts that give information about maps and map types. For example:
    • Maps:  Getting from Here to There by Harvey Weiss
    • Discovering Maps: A Children’s World Atlas Published by Hammond World Atlas Corporation
    • Student Atlas of Hawaii by James O.  Jurik
  • All About Maps (Hello Out There) by Catherine Chambers
  • Various types of maps, such as:
    • Political
    • Economic/Resource
    • Topographical
    • Climate
    • Road
  • 1 copy of a text that gives information about Hawaii. For example:
    • Hawaii’s Royal History by Helen Wong and Ann Rayson
    • Hawai’i by Shelley Gill
    • Hawai’i (Celebrate the States) by Jake Goldberg and Joyce Hart
  • Computers with Internet access
  • Old magazines and newspapers
  • Colored pencils
  • Glue
  • Scissors
  • Cardboard
  • Construction paper

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency of each of the following:
    • “Hawaii Quarter Reverse” page
    • “Map of Hawaii” page
    • “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet
    • “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet completed
    • “Map This!” worksheet
    • “Map This!” worksheet completed
    • “Island Introduction” worksheet
    • “Island Introduction” worksheet completed
    • “Island Introduction” rubric
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • “Hawaii Quarter Reverse” (1 per student)
    • Enlarged outline map of Hawaii (1 per student)
    • “The King’s K-W-L Chart” (1 per student)
    • “Map This!” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Island Introduction” worksheet (1 per student)
    • “Island Introduction” rubric (1 per student)
  • Gather various types of maps (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Gather texts that give information about maps and map types (see examples under “Materials”).
  • Locate a text that gives information about Hawaii (see examples under “Materials”) and mark passages to read.
  • Arrange to use the school computer lab for one session.
  • Bookmark Internet sites that contain information about Hawaii.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/310.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state, if available. Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “Hawaii Quarter Reverse” page.  Locate Hawaii on a classroom map.  Note its position in relation to your school’s location.
  2. Examine the Hawaii quarter with the students.  Have the students identify the different elements in this image, including King Kamehameha I and the state’s motto “Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka ’A¯ ina I Ka Pono” (which means “The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness”).
  3. Distribute a “Map of Hawaii” page to each of the students.  Display the labeled transparency of the “Map of Hawaii” page.  Identify that there are eight major islands that make up the state of Hawaii, one of which is uninhabited. Ask the students to label the eight major islands on their maps referring to the completed transparency. The eight major islands of Hawaii are:  Ni’ihau, O’ahu, Maui, Lana’i, Kaua’i, Moloka’i, (the Big Island of) Hawai’i, and Kaho’olawe. Ask students to mark Kaho’olawe as the uninhabited island.  Have the students save their maps to use throughout the lesson.
  4. Distribute the “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet to the students. Ask the stu­ dents to think of what they know about Hawaii and to record their answers on their worksheets in the “K” column.
  5. Display the transparency of the “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet. Ask what the students have recorded in the “K” column of their worksheets. Record their answers on the transparency in the “K” column. Ask the students to think of what they would like to learn about Hawaii and record their responses on their worksheets in the “W” column. Discuss and record student answers in the transparency’s “W” column.
  6. Introduce the students to the selected text about Hawaii. Ask the students to record any new information they learn during the reading in the “L” column on their “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet. Ask the students to think about how Hawaii compares to other states in the United States. Ask the students to also think about why King Kamehameha I is important in Hawaiian history.
  7. Read the selected text passages aloud to students and attend to unfamiliar vocabulary and concepts.
  8. After the reading, ask students to share what they have recorded in the “L” column of their worksheets.  Discuss and record student answers in the “L” column of the transparency.
  9. Ask the students to answer the question at the bottom of their “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet, “Why is King Kamehameha I featured on the Hawaii quarter?” Discuss and record the student responses on the transparency.  Students should know that King Kamehameha I was responsible for uniting the peoples of the Hawaiian islands.
  10. Ask the students to review the “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet and answer any remaining questions.  Collect the worksheet.

Session 2

  1. Redistribute the “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheets from the previous session. Review what students learned and what images are included in the Hawaii quarter. Display the transparency of the “Map of Hawaii” page. Ask the students to look at the coin and the “Map of Hawaii” transparency. Ask the students to discuss the map image in the design.
  2. Introduce the term “archipelago” by writing it on chart paper. Ask students what they think this term means and record student responses.  Define archipelago as “a large group or chain of islands.”
  3. Distribute a “Map This!” worksheet and “Map of Hawaii” page to each student. Display the transparency of the “Map This!” worksheet and review the directions with the students. Answer any student questions.
  4. Give the students time to answer the questions in the “Map Basics” section of the “Map This!” worksheet.  Record the students’ answers on the transparency.  Review and discuss student answers and add student responses to the transparency for the “Why do we use maps?” section.
  5. Introduce the students to the various texts about maps. Ask the students to complete the “Map Match” section of the “Map This!” worksheet in class. Allow the students time to research different map types by using the various texts about maps.
  6. Review the “Map This!” worksheet with the students.  Display the transparency of the completed “Map This!” worksheet.  Review and discuss student answers.  Show the students the examples of different types of maps and pass them around the classroom.  Discuss with the students some of the characteristics of these maps and the functions that each of the map types serve.  Collect the worksheets from the students.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Redistribute the “The King’s K-W-L Chart” worksheet and the “Map This!” worksheet and have the students review both worksheets. Answer any student questions.
  2. Distribute an “Island Introduction” worksheet and an “Island Introduction” presentation rubric to each student.  Review both sheets with the students. Explain to the students that they will be researching one of the seven inhabited islands (excluding uninhabited Kaho’olawe) that make up the state of Hawaii.  Each student will need to complete the “Island Introduction” worksheet and create a map of the chosen island.
  3. Explain to the students that the map of the island can be a political map, a resource and economic map, or a physical map.  Students will need to create this map using a variety of materials (such as magazines or newspapers, cardboard, construction paper, and markers).
  4. Review the “Island Introduction” presentation rubric with the students.  Explain that they will need to present their island and the map they have created to the class. The map should highlight the unique features of the island and the facts should be displayed on the map in some way. Explain that all the worksheets (“The King’s K- W-L Chart,” “Map This!” and “Island Introduction”) will be collected after their presentation.
  5. Arrange for class time in the school’s computer lab and to have texts in class for students to use as resources.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Have students use texts at various reading levels for their research materials.
  • Allow students to write their reports by hand or use a scribe rather than use the computer.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students locate other islands of North America or the United States on a map.
  • Have students note the longitude and latitude of these islands.
  • Have students research the climate of their home state. Ask students to examine how the longitude and latitude of their home state may affect its climate.

Use the students’ class participation, worksheets, island maps, and presentation rubrics to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Using Technological Information
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Global Connections
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to explain how interactions among language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements can facilitate global understanding or cause misunderstanding
  • help learners to explain conditions and motivations that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations
  • provide opportunities for learners to analyze and evaluate the effects of changing technologies on the global community
  • challenge learners to analyze the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to persistent, contemporary, and emerging global issues, such as health care, security, resource allocation, economic development, and environmental quality
  • guide learner analysis of the relationships and tensions between national sovereignty and global interests in such matters as territorial disputes, economic development, nuclear and other weapons deployment, use of natural resources, and human rights concerns
  • have learners analyze or formulate policy statements that demonstrate an understanding of concerns, standards, issues, and conflicts related to universal human rights
  • help learners to describe and evaluate the role of international and multinational organizations in the global arena
  • have learners illustrate how individual behaviors and decisions connect with global systems

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
Cluster: Geography
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • guide learners in the use of maps and other geographic representations, tools, and technologies to acquire, process, and report information from a spatial perspective
  • enable learners to use mental maps to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context
  • assist learners to analyze the spatial information about people, places, and environments on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand the physical and human characteristics of places
  • assist learners in developing the concept of regions as a means to interpret Earth’s complexity
  • enable learners to understand how culture and experience influence people’s perceptions of places and regions
  • provide learners opportunities to understand and analyze the physical processes that shape Earth’s surface
  • challenge learners to consider the characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems on Earth’s surface
  • guide learners in exploring the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • help learners to understand and analyze the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of Earth’s cultural mosaics
  • have learners explore the patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth’s surface
  • enable learners to describe the processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement
  • challenge learners to examine how the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth’s surface; help learners see how human actions modify the physical environment
  • enable learners to analyze how physical systems affect human systems
  • challenge learners to examine the changes that occur in the meaning, use, distribution, and importance of resources
  • help learners to apply geography to interpret the past and present and to plan for the future
  • enhance learners’ abilities to ask questions and to acquire, organize, and analyze geographic information so they can answer geographic questions as they engage in the study of substantive geographic content

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Research
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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