skip navigation
Left Navigation Links

 

Sing for Your State

Printable view

Summary

Students will make and record careful observations about a state quarter. They will use their observations to develop songs about a coin.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will make and record careful observations about a state quarter.
  • They will use their observations to develop songs about a coin.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Music

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Science
  • Social Studies

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Making physical observations
  • Rhyme patterns
  • Symbols

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Musical heritage
  • Value
  • Relief
  • Mint mark
  • Edge
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)

Materials

  • 1 class map of the United States of America
  • 1 overhead projector (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Tennessee quarter reverse (back)
  • Chart pape
  • Markers
  • Coin Parts sheet
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “Coin Parts” sheet
  • Characteristics Web sheet
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Characteristics Web sheet
  • Envelopes (1 per small group)
  • Each 2002 quarter (1 quarter per small group)
  • Dictionaries, thesauruses, and rhyming dictionaries (if available)
  • State Information 2002 Quarters sheet
  • Writing paper

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the Tennessee quarter reverse.
  • Make an overhead transparency of the “Coin Parts” sheet.
  • Make copies of the “Coin Parts” sheet (1 per student).
  • Gather all 2002 state quarters (1 quarter per pair of students).
  • Make an overhead transparency of the “Characteristics Web” sheet.
  • Make copies of the “Characteristics Web” sheet (1 per student).
  • Place 1 state quarter in each envelope.
  • Make copies of the “State Information 2002 Quarters” sheet (1 per student)
  • Visit the glossary on the U.S. Mint H.I.P. Pocket Change™ Web site (www.usmint.gov/kids/index.cfm?fileContents=/kids/campcoin/glossary.cfm) to familiarize yourself with coin terminology.

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/342.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the 50 State Quarters® Program for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state if available. Then use the overhead transparency or photocopy of the Tennessee quarter reverse to introduce the quarter. Have a pair of students locate Tennessee on the map.
  2. Direct the students to examine the reverse design of the Tennessee quarter and share what they see. On chart paper, have students list their comments.
  3. Ask students why they think Tennessee put musical instruments on their quarter. Discuss the words “Musical Heritage” on the quarter. Build on their responses, but convey the idea that music and song writing are both important to that state.
  4. As a class, discuss common song topics (reflect on a song that all students are familiar with). Ideas discussed should include things that are important to the writer, that interest the writer, and that the writer knows about. Explain to the students that they will work in small groups to examine a quarter of their own, and to write a song to the tune of their choice to reflect their observations. Brainstorm a list of song titles that would be appropriate for use.
    Note: Remember to respect and comply with our nation’s copyright laws when you do this project, especially if you plan to use copyrighted editions, arrangements, or recordings.
  5. Distribute a “Coin Parts” sheet to each student. Reexamine the Tennessee quarter with the students, reviewing relevant coin terms. Introduce the “Characteristics Web” sheet to guide the students in noting the physical characteristics and the value of this coin.
  6. Divide the students into small groups. Distribute an envelope and a “Characteristics Web” sheet to each group.
  7. Instruct the groups to begin by examining the coin in their envelope and completing the “Characteristics Web” sheet.

Session 2

  1. Instruct the groups to choose a melody from the class list that they think would best allow them to describe the coin, and work together to write the song. Ask them to try to incorporate the location of the state into the lyrics, follow the song’s rhythms, use similes and metaphors, and use whatever dictionaries, thesauruses, and rhyming dictionaries are available to the class.
  2. When the students have completed their songs, have each group sing it for the rest of the class!

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Take students to the computer lab to conduct research about their coins.
  • Allow students to present their observations through a variety of genres (drawings,raps, poems, etc.).
  • Instruct students to act out their songs to help non-native English speakers build their vocabulary.
  • Videotape or record the performance and place a typed version of the song with the recording at a viewing/listening center to help students connect the words to their spellings.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Perform the songs for other classes in the school. Prepare props, such as enlarged coins, to use when performing the song.
  • Have students independently research the motto “E Pluribus Unum” that is also found on each quarter.
  • Share various state songs and discuss their basic meaning as a class or in small groups.

Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.6 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.6.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
    • Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
    • Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
    • Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
    • Establish and maintain a formal style.
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.
  • W.6.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
    • Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    • Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.
    • Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
    • Establish and maintain a formal style.
    • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.
  • W.6.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
    • Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
    • Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
    • Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events.
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.5 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.5.1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
    • Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
    • Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
    • Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
  • W.5.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
    • Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    • Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
    • Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
    • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
    • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • W.5.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
    • Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
    • Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
    • Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
    • Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
    • Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.6 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.6.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.6.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 6.)
  • W.6.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.4 Language
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.4.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).
    • Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.
    • Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.
    • Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).
    • Form and use prepositional phrases.
    • Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
    • Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).
  • L.4.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use correct capitalization.
    • Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text.
    • Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
    • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.5 Language
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.5.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
    • Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.
    • Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.
    • Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).
  • L.5.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
    • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.
    • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
    • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
    • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.6 Language
Grade(s): Grade 6
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.6.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).
    • Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.
    • Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).
    • Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others' writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.
  • L.6.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 5-8 Music
Cluster: Standard 6: Listening to, analyzing, and describing music
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students describe specific music events (e.g., entry of oboe, change of meter, return of refrain) in a given aural example, using appropriate terminology
  • Students analyze the uses of elements of music in aural examples representing diverse genres and cultures
  • Students demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and harmonic progressions in their analyses of music

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 5-8 Music
Cluster: Standard 8: Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students compare in two or more arts how the characteristic materials of each art (that is, sound in music, visual stimuli in visual arts, movement in dance, human interrelationships in theatre) can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art
  • Students describe ways in which the principles and subject matter of other disciplines taught in the school are interrelated with those of music (e.g., language arts: issues to be considered in setting texts to music; mathematics: frequency ratios of intervals; sciences: the human hearing process and hazards to hearing; social studies: historical and social events and movements chronicled in or influenced by musical works

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 5-8 Music
Cluster: Standard 9: Understanding music in relation to history and culture
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of cultures
  • Students classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied body of exemplary (that is, high-quality and characteristic) musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be considered exemplary
  • Students compare, in several cultures of the world, functions music serves, roles of musicians (e.g., lead guitarist in a rock band, composer of jingles for commercials, singer in Peking opera), and conditions under which music is typically performed