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Worth the Weight

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Summary

The student will convert metric units of measurement. The student will solve problems that involve addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division with decimals, as well as order decimals from least to greatest.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • 50 State Quarters

Objectives

  • The student will convert metric units of measurement.
  • The student will solve problems that involve addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division with decimals, as well as order decimals from least to greatest.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Science

Grades

  • Fourth grade
  • Fifth grade
  • Sixth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • Grams
  • Millimeters
  • Centimeters
  • Diameter

Materials

  • Copies of the “Worth the Weight” chart and questions (pages 16 and 17) one per student
  • Calculator
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Metric scale or metric ruler (optional)

Preparations

  • Copies of the “Worth the Weight” chart and questions (pages 16 and 17), one per student.
  • Read through lesson.
  • Set up metric scale (if available).

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/354-359.pdf.

  1. List lesson terms on the board and discuss metric units of measurement.
  2. Give students a mental comparison: for example, a gram is a metric unit measurement of weight approximately equal to the weight of a paper clip, or 1 inch is about 2.5 centimeters.
  3. Review the measurement of length using the metric units millimeters and centimeters.
  4. Review with students that 10 millimeters equals 1 centimeter. Demonstrate how to convert millimeters to centimeters either by dividing the number of millimeters by 10 (example 22.56mm/10 = 2.256cm), or by using a short-cut of moving the decimal one space to the left when converting from a smaller unit of measurement to a larger unit of measurement.
  5.  Demonstrate how to measure the width of a piece of paper by lining up the coins and adding their diameters. Hand out “Worth the Weight” worksheets (pages 16 and 17) and review directions.
  6. Students will be evaluated by checking for accuracy in their work. Review students’ work and quiz them for understanding of the concepts presented in the lesson.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Students can come up with an additional five questions related to the information found in the chart, and then quiz a classmate for extra credit.
  • Students can weigh the coins using a metric measuring device or convert the measurements into U.S. customary units of measurement.
  • Use the worksheets and class participation to assess whether the students have met the lesson objectives.
  • Give a quiz to assess their understanding of the concepts presented in the lesson.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 4.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade 4
Cluster: Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit
Standards:

  • 4.MD.1. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm, kg, g, lb, oz, l, ml, hr, min and sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two column table.
    • For example, know that 1ft is 12 times as long as 1in. Express the length of a 4ft snake as 48in. Generate a conversion table for feet and inches listing the number pairs (1, 12), (2, 24), (3, 36), ...
  • 4.MD.2. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.
  • 4.MD.3. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical problems. For example, find the width of a rectangular room given the area of the flooring and the length, by viewing the area formula as a multiplication equation with an unknown factor. 

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Measurement
Cluster: Apply appropriate techniques, tools, and formulas to determine measurements.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • develop strategies for estimating the perimeters, areas, and volumes of irregular shapes;
  • select and apply appropriate standard units and tools to measure length, area, volume, weight, time, temperature, and the size of angles;
  • select and use benchmarks to estimate measurements;
  • develop, understand, and use formulas to find the area of rectangles and related triangles and parallelograms; and
  • develop strategies to determine the surface areas and volumes of rectangular solids.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 3-5 Measurement
Cluster: Understand measurable attributes of objects and the units, systems, and processes of measurement.
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

In grades 3–5 all students should

  • understand such attributes as length, area, weight, volume, and size of angle and select the appropriate type of unit for measuring each attribute;
  • understand the need for measuring with standard units and become familiar with standard units in the customary and metric systems;
  • carry out simple unit conversions, such as from centimeters to meters, within a system of measurement;
  • understand that measurements are approximations and how differences in units affect precision; and
  • explore what happens to measurements of a two-dimensional shape such as its perimeter and area when the shape is changed in some way.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: All Problem Solving
Cluster: Instructional programs from kindergarten through grade 12 should enable all students to
Grade(s): Grades 3–5
Standards:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving
  • Solve problems that arise in mathematics and in other contexts
  • Apply and adapt a variety of appropriate strategies to solve problems
  • Monitor and reflect on the process of mathematical problem solving

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