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A Visit to White Mountain

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Summary

Starting with the White Mountain National Forest quarter, students will analyze the history of White Mountain National Forest to understand how visiting the forest has changed from when the park opened in 1918 to today.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America The Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

Students will analyze the history of White Mountain National Forest to understand how visiting the forest has changed from when the park opened in 1918 to today.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art

Grades

  • Ninth grade
  • Tenth grade
  • Eleventh grade
  • Twelfth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Materials

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/376.pdf.

  1. Display and examine the “White Mountain National Forest Quarter” page or use the coin’s zoom feature at www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/atb/?local=WhiteMountain.  Locate this national site on a class map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location. As background, explain to the students that the United States Mint began to issue the quarters in the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program in 2010. By the time the program ends in 2021, there will be a total of 56 designs. Each design will focus on a different national site—one from each state, territory and the District of Columbia.
  2. In either small groups or pairs, create a circle map of adjectives that come to mind when looking at the quarter design.
  3. Print out or have the students read the sections titled About the Forest, Special Places, and History and Culture on the White Mountain National Forest’s Web site.  Using any grouping (whole class, small group, pairs, or individual), have the students answer the following questions.
    • Why do people go on vacation? To relax, reconnect with family, relieve stress, see new places, get away from daily life, etc.
    • Where do they go? Somewhere new, foreign country, somewhere beautiful, different weather (warm/snow), place they can learn something new, etc.
    • Why was White Mountain National Forest established? To preserve the forest (see www.fs.usda.gov/main/whitemountain/about-forest).
    • How long has White Mountain been a National Forest? Since 1918.
    • Why did and do people visit the National Forest? To see pristine land, have wilderness adventure, avoid crowds, learn about the past, enjoy nature, etc.
    • Describe what visiting the forest would have been like when it opened in 1918. Hard to get to, few amenities, fewer visitors, too expensive for many, no GPS/Internet to plan trip, etc.
    • Compare being a visitor when the park opened in 1918 and now. Now: Can pre-plan trip online, more affordable, more amenities like indoor plumbing and paved paths, more crowded, more hotels/gas stations/highways ease travel, etc.
    • Why do you think we still have National Forests today? To preserve nature, local history, local heritage, natural habitat for animals and to have local outdoor areas for people to use.
  4. Have the students create projects that explore why people visit White Mountain National Forest and what has changed since 1918, focusing on a decade between 1910 and today. Have all the students complete the "White Mountain Postcard" worksheet and, in addition, have small groups choose a product such as those listed on the "Come to White Mountain Rubric."
There are no modification options for this lesson plan.
  • Take anecdotal notes from the large/small group discussions.
  • Use the rubric to assess students’ understanding of the objective.

This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 9-12 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 3: Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Proficient:

  • Students reflect on how artworks differ visually, spatially, temporally, and functionally, and describe how these are related to history and culture
  • Students apply subjects, symbols, and ideas in their artworks and use the skills gained to solve problems in daily life

Advanced:

  • Students describe the origins of specific images and ideas and explain why they are of value in their artwork and in the work of others
  • Students evaluate and defend the validity of sources for content and the manner in which subject matter, symbols, and images are used in the students' works and in significant works by others

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Individual Development and Identity
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners in articulating personal connections to time, place, and social/cultural systems
  •  help learners to appreciate and describe the influence of cultures, past and  present, upon the daily lives of individuals
  • assist learners to describe how family, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic status, and other group and cultural influences contribute to the development of a sense of self
  • have learners apply concepts, inquiry, methods, and theories in the study of human growth and development, learning, motivation, behavior, perception, and personality
  • guide learners as they analyze the interactions among ethical, ethnic, national, and cultural factors in specific situations
  • help learners to analyze the role of perceptions, attitudes, values, and beliefs in the development of personal identity and their effect upon human behavior
  • have learners compare and evaluate the impact of stereotyping, conformity, acts of altruism, discrimination, and other behaviors on individuals and groups
  • help learners understand how individual perceptions develop, vary, and can lead to conflict
  • assist learners as they work independently and cooperatively within groups and institutions to accomplish goals
  • enable learners to examine factors that contribute to and damage one’s mental health; and analyze issues related to mental health and behavioral disorders in contemporary society

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
Cluster: History
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners in utilizing chronological thinking so that they can distinguish between past, present, and future time; can place historical narratives in the proper chronological framework; can interpret data presented in time lines; and can compare alternative models for periodization
  • enable learners to develop historical comprehension in order that they might reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage, identify the central question(s) addressed in historical narrative, draw upon data in historical maps, charts, and other graphic organizers; and draw upon visual, literary, or musical sources
  • guide learners in practicing skills of historical analysis and interpretation, such as compare and contrast, differentiate between historical facts and interpretations, consider multiple perspectives, analyze cause and effect relationships, compare competing historical narratives, recognize the tentative nature of historical interpretations, and hypothesize the influence of the past; help learners understand how historians study history;
  • assist learners in developing historical research capabilities that enable them to formulate historical questions, obtain historical data, question historical data, identify the gaps in available records, place records in context, and construct sound historical interpretations
  • help learners to identify issues and problems in the past, recognize factors contributing to such problems, identify and analyze alternative courses of action, formulate a position or course of action, and evaluate the implementation of that decision
  • assist learners in acquiring knowledge of historical content in United States history in order to ask large and searching questions that compare patterns of continuity and change in the history and values of the many peoples who have contributed to the development of the continent of North America
  • guide learners in acquiring knowledge of the history and values of diverse civilizations throughout the world, including those of the West, and in comparing patterns of continuity and change in different parts of the world
  • enable learners to develop historical understanding through the avenues of
  • social, political, economic, and cultural history and the history of science and technology