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This Coin is Our Song

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Summary

Starting with the Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine quarter, students will recognize national anthems and identify musical instruments. Students will demonstrate an understanding of creating an original song and designing a class coin.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America The Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will recognize national anthems and identify musical instruments.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of creating an original song and designing a class coin.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Music

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Three
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Materials

  • Worksheets:
    • “Fort McHenry National Monument and Historical Shrine Quarter”
    • “Whose Sound Do I Hear?”
    • “This Coin Is Our Song”
  • Age-appropriate, relevant Web sites, such as:

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/387.pdf.

  1. Before the class, choose a recording of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and create an answer key of instruments used in your chosen version.
  2. Display and examine the “Fort McHenry National Monument and Historical Shrine Quarter” page or use the zoom feature at www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/atb/?local=FortMcHenry. Locate this national site on a class map. Note its position in relation to your school’s location. Tell the students that the front of a coin is called the “obverse” and the back is called the “reverse.” Explain to the students that the United States Mint began to issue the quarters in the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program in 2010. By the time the program ends in 2021, there will be a total of 56 designs. Each design will focus on a different national site—one from each state, territory and the District of Columbia.
  3. While examining the image with the class, play a recording of “The Star-Spangled Banner” that highlights various instruments. Encourage the students to share how the song makes them feel, where they have heard it before and what they think the song is about. Record responses on a class chart.
  4. Explain to the students that Fort McHenry was the birthplace of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the national anthem of the United States. Tell the students that Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the words to the song after seeing the fort bombed all night and then seeing its flag still flying the next morning.
  5. Explain that most countries have other national anthems and each one is special to that country. Play some other national anthems for the students. Encourage the students to identify some of the musical instruments they hear. Display and discuss instruments with the students, partnering with the school band if possible. If  instruments are not available, use an online or recorded resource to demonstrate the sounds that various instruments make.
  6. Place images of instruments around the room. Play “The Star-Spangled Banner” again for the students. Periodically pause the song and ask the students to stand by the instrument that they last heard. Discuss their choices. (Note: If you use an electronic simulation, the instruments may be hard to identify.)
  7. Distribute the “Whose Sound Do I Hear?” worksheet and have the students complete it while listening to “The Star-Spangled Banner” again. Review the worksheets once complete.
  8. Explain that the class will be writing an anthem about your class or school. On chart paper, brainstorm the qualities that could be included in the anthem. Choose instruments if available to accompany the song, or just use their personal instruments: the voice.
  9. Once the song is complete, distribute the “This Coin Is Our Song” worksheet and have each student design a coin image on the worksheet based on the song the class created. Perform the song for another class or the whole school.
There are no modification options for this lesson plan.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.
  • Evaluate the students’ worksheets and projects for understanding of the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.K Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.K.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
    • Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
    • Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
    • Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
    • Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
    • Recognize and name end punctuation.
    • Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
    • Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.1 Language
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
    • Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
    • Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns (e.g., I, me, my; they, them, their, anyone, everything).
    • Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future (e.g., Yesterday I walked home; Today I walk home; Tomorrow I will walk home).
    • Use frequently occurring adjectives.
    • Use frequently occurring conjunctions (e.g., and, but, or, so, because).
    • Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
    • Use frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., during, beyond, toward).
    • Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize dates and names of people.
    • Use end punctuation for sentences.
    • Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
    • Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring irregular words.
    • Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.1.1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.