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Let's Talk Turkey

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Summary

Students will identify nonfiction text features in a variety of materials. Students will use nonfiction text features in their own nonfiction writing piece.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coin

Objectives

  • Students will identify nonfiction text features in a variety of materials.
  • Students will use nonfiction text features in their own nonfiction writing piece.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Science

Grades

  • Second grade
  • Third grade

Class Time

Sessions: Five
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Fiction and nonfiction
  • Research
  • The writing process
  • Skimming
  • Exit slips

Terms and Concepts

  • Native American $1 Coin
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)
  • Nonfiction text features
  • Table of contents
  • Index
  • Print styles (bold, italics, highlight)
  • Glossary
  • Caption
  • Heading and subheading
  • Text box
  • Illustration
  • Photograph
  • Diagram
  • Label
  • Chart
  • Map
  • Treaty

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector or equivalent classroom technology
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” page
  • Copies of the following:
    • “Exit Slip” worksheet
    • “Hunting for Features” worksheet
    • “Let’s Talk Turkey” worksheet
    • “Talking Turkey Rubric”
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives basic information about wild turkeys, such as:
    • All About Turkeys by Jim Arnosky
    • Wild Turkeys (Early Bird Nature) by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
    • High Ridge Gobbler: A Story of the American Wild Turkey by David Stemple
  • Large collection of nonfiction materials about turtles, wolves and turkeys that have many examples of text features and structures
  • Age-appropriate materials for research that provide information about wild turkeys, such as Internet sites, videos, textbooks, reference materials and other texts
  • Internet access (optional)
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Pencils and crayons
  • Sticky notes
  • Writing paper 

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” page.
  • Make copies of the following:
    • Exit Slip worksheet (1 per student, cut if desired)
    • Hunting for Features worksheet (1 per student)
    • Let’s Talk Turkey worksheet (1 per student)
    • Talking Turkey Rubric (1 per student)
  • Locate a text that gives basic information about wild turkeys (see examples under Materials).
  • Gather a collection of nonfiction materials about turtles, wolves and turkeys that have many examples of text features.
  • Locate materials for partner research that provide additional information about the wild turkey.
  • Prepare a chart labeled Nonfiction Text Features. 

Worksheets and Files

Lesson plan, worksheet(s), and rubric (if any) at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/405.pdf.

Session 1

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.  The program is described at www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/nativeamerican.
  2. Display the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency.  Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the “reverse” and “obverse” is another name for the front.
  3. Ask the students to examine the image and explain what they see. Explain that the theme of this coin is “Treaty with the Delawares of 1778.”  Tell the students that, after declaring independence, the United States signed its first formal treaty with an Indian tribe, the Delawares, at Fort Pitt, Pa. (now Pittsburgh) on September 17, 1778. Explain that the three animals depicted on the coin are very important to the Delaware Indians, as each animal represents a different clan within the tribe.
  4. Display the chart labeled “Nonfiction Text Features.”  Explain that nonfiction text features help organize text and help the reader to know what is important.  Using a Think-Pair-Share format, ask the students to discuss and share any text features they already know.  Add these text features to the chart.
  5. Explain to the students that they will investigate what makes turkeys so special to the Delawares and hunt for nonfiction text features in a text about wild turkeys.
  6. Read the selected text aloud. During the reading, ask the students to look for the author’s use of nonfiction text features.  Add any new nonfiction text features to the chart. After reading, ask the students to briefly share with a partner how each text feature helped the reader to understand what was important.
  7. Explain that in the next session the students will be searching materials for each author’s nonfiction text features to help the reader understand what is important.
  8. To wrap up the session, distribute copies of the “Exit Slip” worksheet and ask the students to explain why text features are important (question 1), then collect.

Session 2

  1. Display the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency.  Review with the students the material covered in the previous session, including the “Nonfiction Text Features” chart.  Review the importance of nonfiction text features and the examples observed in the text about wild turkeys.
  2. Explain to the students that they will be hunting for nonfiction text features. Distribute copies of the “Hunting for Features” worksheet and explain all the directions. Briefly discuss each of the nonfiction text features on the list.
  3. Model skimming a text and hunting for nonfiction text features, marking the found text features with a sticky note and adding the features to the worksheet.
  4. Allow students time to work with partners to hunt through the nonfiction materials for nonfiction text features and record them on their worksheets. Explain to the students that the collection includes materials about the three animals on the 2013 Native American $1 Coin.
  5. As a class, discuss the nonfiction text features they discovered, why the authors used specific text features and how the text features could help readers to understand what is important.
  6. Explain to the students that in the next session they will be researching additional information about wild turkeys. Later, they will create their own nonfiction text, which will include text features in order to help their readers understand.
  7. To wrap up the session, distribute copies of the “Exit Slip” worksheet and ask the students to write one text feature they would like to use and why (question 2), then collect them.

Session 3

  1. Display the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency.  Review with the students the material covered in the previous sessions, including the “Nonfiction Text Features” chart.  Review the importance of those features and the examples observed in the examined texts.
  2. Distribute a copy of the “Let’s Talk Turkey” worksheet to each student.  Explain to the students that they will each join with a partner and use available classroom resources to research wild turkeys to prepare for writing their own nonfiction texts.
  3. Allow students time to work with partners to conduct research about wild turkeys. Ask the students to record their notes on the “Let’s Talk Turkey” worksheet.
  4. After the research, ask the pairs to share their findings and allow the other students time to add to their notes based on the other students’ ideas.
  5. Explain to the students that in the next session they will be using their wild turkey research to create their own nonfiction text using nonfiction text features.

Sessions 4 and 5

  1. Display the “2013 Native American $1 Coin” overhead transparency.  Review the material covered in the previous sessions, focusing on nonfiction text features.
  2. Explain to the students that they will work independently to create their own nonfiction texts about wild turkeys, using their choice of nonfiction text features.
  3. Distribute copies of the “Talking Turkey Rubric” and discuss expectations.  Provide writing and illustration materials for students to complete their work.
  4. Provide the students with time to write, revise and edit their nonfiction texts.
  5. Allow the students to share their final products with the class.
  6. To wrap up the lesson, ask students to share how another student’s use of nonfiction text features helped them to understand.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to use a scribe or computer program.
  • Include a wide variety of reading levels in the nonfiction text collection.
  • Allow students to work in pairs to create their nonfiction writing about wild turkeys. 

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students research the other animals on the 2013 Native American $1 Coin and create nonfiction writing integrating nonfiction text features.
  • Have students create writing projects about the three animals on the coin in a variety of fiction and nonfiction genres. Assemble all the writing pieces into a class book.
  • Have students learn more about Native Americans through other Native American $1 Coin lesson plans for grades 2 and 3 at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/nativeAmerican/download.cfm.
  • Have students learn more about nonfiction text features with the 2006 Return to Monticello Westward Journey Nickel Series™ lesson plan for grade 3 at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/viewLP.cfm?id=176.
  • Evaluate the students’ worksheets and final products for understanding of the lesson objectives.
  • Use the “Talking Turkey Rubric” to evaluate students’ understanding of how to use nonfiction text features. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.2 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.2.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Use collective nouns (e.g., group).
    • Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns (e.g., feet, children, teeth, mice, fish).
    • Use reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves)
    • Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs (e.g., sat, hid, told).
    • Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences (e.g., The boy watched the movie; The little boy watched the movie; The action movie was watched by the little boy).
  • L.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
    • Use commas in greetings and closings of letters.
    • Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives.
    • Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage --> badge; boy --> boil).
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.3 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.3.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences.
    • Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
    • Use abstract nouns (e.g., childhood).
    • Form and use regular and irregular verbs.
    • Form and use the simple (e.g., I walked; I walk; I will walk) verb tenses.
    • Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement.
    • Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
    • Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
    • Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences.
  • L.3.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Capitalize appropriate words in titles.
    • Use commas in addresses.
    • Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
    • Form and use possessives.
    • Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness).
    • Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words.
    • Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: L.8 Language
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Conventions of Standard English
Standards:

  • L.8.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
    • Explain the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences.
    • Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.
    • Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.
    • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.
  • L.8.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
    • Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break.
    • Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission.
    • Spell correctly.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.2.1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RI.2.2. Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • RI.2.3. Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.2.7. Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.
  • RI.2.8. Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
  • RI.2.9. Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.2 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.2.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
  • RI.2.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
  • RI.2.6. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.3.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area.
  • RI.3.5. Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • RI.3.6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.3.7. Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
  • RI.3.8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
  • RI.3.9. Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.3 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.3.1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • RI.3.2. Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • RI.3.3. Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.2.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • W.2.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.2.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.2 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.2.4. begins in grade 3.
  • W.2.5. With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • W.2.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.3.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
  • W.3.8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories.
  • W.3.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.3 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 2
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.3.4. With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3.)
  • W.3.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3.)
  • W.3.6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Text
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound–letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Print/Non-print Texts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

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