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I’m in the Money!

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Summary

Students will play a game in which they count out the costs in coins for different labeled classroom items. This lesson is part of the Unit Plan “What’s it Worth?

Coin Type(s)

  • Cent
  • Nickel
  • Dime
  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • Generic

Objectives

  • Students will recognize and express the value using cent notation of a penny, nickel, dime, and quarter.
  • Students will add coin amounts together.
  • Students will recognize math being used in everyday life.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade
  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group

Terms and Concepts

  • Cent
  • Coin combinations
  • Counting
  • Dime
  • Math games
  • Money
  • Nickel
  • Penny
  • Quarter

Materials

  • 1 bag of change for each student (these can be plastic coins or coin reproducibles)
  • Price tags to stick on classroom items
  1. Label a variety of items around the classroom with price tags of different values.
  2. Have students walk around the classroom and take a tour to see the different items for sale and their prices.
  3. Distribute a bag of money to each student.
  4. Call on a student to select an item to buy.
  5. Instruct everyone in the class to count out the price using their own coins.
  6. Review each student’s work. Those who have it correct win a round.
  7. Continue to play in this manner until a student has five straight wins. Display the winner's name on the board under the heading "I’m in the Money."

Differentiated Learning Options

Students can create their own game with the items in the classroom.

Observe how the students are doing after each round of the game. Students can record their answers and draw the amount of money using labeled circles.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 1.OA Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction
Standards:

  • 1.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart and comparing with unknowns in all positions, eg, by using objects, drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • 1.OA.2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, eg, by using objects, drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. 

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Compute fluently and make reasonable estimates.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • develop and use strategies for whole-number computations, with a focus on addition and subtraction;
  • develop fluency with basic number combinations for addition and subtraction; and
  • use a variety of methods and tools to compute, including objects, mental computation, estimation, paper and pencil, and calculators.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand meanings of operations and how they relate to one another.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • understand various meanings of addition and subtraction of whole numbers and the relationship between the two operations;
  • understand the effects of adding and subtracting whole numbers; and
  • understand situations that entail multiplication and division, such as equal groupings of objects and sharing equally.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Number and Operations
Cluster: Understand numbers, ways of representing numbers, relationships among numbers, and number systems.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • count with understanding and recognize "how many" in sets of objects;
  • use multiple models to develop initial understandings of place value and the base-ten number system;
  • develop understanding of the relative position and magnitude of whole numbers and of ordinal and cardinal numbers and their connections;
  • develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers;
  • connect number words and numerals to the quantities they represent, using various physical models and representations; and
  • understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.

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