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Turkeys or Eagles?

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Summary

After discussing how Benjamin Franklin wanted the wild turkey (not the bald eagle) to be our national bird, students graph their preferences and discuss the survey results.

Coin Type(s)

  • None

Coin Program(s)

  • Generic

Objectives

  • Students will collect, organize, and describe data.
  • Students will construct, read, and interpret data.
  • Students will solve problems that involve collecting and analyzing data.
  • Students will explore concepts of chance.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade
  • Second grade

Class Time

Sessions: One
Session Length: 30-45 minutes
Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • Probability
  • Problem Solving
  • Statistics

Materials

  • Paper (chart for the graph, construction for the small squares)
  • Crayons
  • Glue

Preparations

  • Cut out a small paper square for each student in the class, and use chart paper to create a classroom graph with two areas:  Turkeys and Eagles.
  • You may want to gather pictures and other information about bald eagles and wild turkeys.
  1. Share the following fun fact with students: Benjamin Franklin wasn't happy that the eagle was selected as our national bird. He wanted it to be the wild turkey. Franklin wrote: "I wish the bald eagle had never been chosen as the representative of our country; he is a bird of bad moral character; he does not get his living honestly..."
  2. Ask students, If you had your choice, which would you rather have as our national bird, the bald eagle or the wild turkey? Why do you think it better represents our nation?
  3. Give each student a paper square and crayons. Have them draw their "bird of choice" on the paper.
  4. Have students come to the class graph and glue their bird drawing under Turkey or Eagle on the graph.
  5. As a class, analyze the results. Ask questions such as:
    • How many students in our class think the bald eagle is the best national bird?
    • How many students in our class think the wild turkey would be a better choice?
    • How many more people in our class like eagles instead of turkeys?
    • What else can you tell about the students in our room from this graph?

Differentiated Learning Options

Have students create a bar graph of the classroom responses using graphing software, such as The Graph Club or The Cruncher.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students write additional questions about the graph's data and ask other students to answer them.
  • Have students research and learn about other kinds of birds. Using the information they've gathered, have students select another bird that could be our national bird and explain the reasons behind their choice.

Technology Extensions

Have students create a bar graph of the classroom responses using graphing software, such as The Graph Club or The Cruncher.

Observe and discuss the activity with the students to assess whether they have met the lesson objectives.

Discipline: Math
Domain: K.MD Measurement and Data
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Describe and compare measurable attributes
Standards:

  • K.MD.1. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight.
    • Describe several measurable attributes of a single object

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • discuss events related to students' experiences as likely or unlikely.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: K-2 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.
Grade(s): Grades K–2
Standards:

In K through grade 2 all students should

  • pose questions and gather data about themselves and their surroundings;
  • sort and classify objects according to their attributes and organize data about the objects; and
  • represent data using concrete objects, pictures, and graphs.

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