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13 Lesson Plan Starters

Printable view

Summary

See individual starters.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America The Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

To explore the rich history and environment of national sites using the United States Mint's America the Beautiful Quarters® Program.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Math
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • Technology

Grades

  • Seventh grade
  • Eighth grade

Class Time

Sessions: Six
Session Length: 45-60 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Materials

Research materials, Internet, art and writing supplies

Worksheets and Files

Rubric template at www.usmint.gov/kids/teachers/lessonPlans/pdf/80-81-91-92.pdf

Designating the National Parks and Forest

Subject Area

Social Studies

Summary

Research the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins and their history.  Research how an area becomes a site of national significance and review how a bill becomes a law.  Complete a sequence chain showing the process of making a bill into a law and becoming designated as a site of national significance.

Welcome! I'm Your Guide

Subject Areas

Language Arts, Social Studies

Summary

Using podcast, video, or slide show software, produce a multimedia tour of one of the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Be a virtual guide as you show visitors through the site.

Significant Data

Subject Area

Mathematics

Summary

In many businesses and government organizations, people often give presentations.  These presentations may be used to sell a product or idea, update information about that organization, or to give information to the public.  Often these presentations include graphs of some type to show and compare information or data.  Graphs are used because they are a way of visually representing the data so that people can see the relationships between the data more easily.

Collect, organize and create a series of graphs about the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Information displayed can include acreage, budget, visitation, and elevation.  Create a presentation of your graphs and highlight the important comparisons.

Plan Your Visit

Subject Areas

Social Studies, Mathematics

Summary

Locate some of the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins that you would be interested in visiting.  Locate them on a map and determine the best route to the park from your school.  Draw the best route on the map.  Measure and calculate the distance and estimate how long it would take you to get there.  Create an itinerary for your travel.

Viewing History

Subject Area

Social Studies

Summary

Timelines show events that happen during a particular time period or to a particular place or person.  Create a visual timeline, using photos, of important events in the history of a site of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Show your timeline using multimedia software or a photo slide show.

Weather Watchers

Subject Areas

Science, Mathematics

Summary

Many people visit the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins throughout the year.  Research the weather for one of the sites and collect weather data from the site.  This weather information can be temperature, precipitation, etc.  Using graphs to support your position, create a persuasive presentation on the best time of year to visit that site.

Mountains, Mesas and More

Subject Area

Social Studies, Science

Summary

Research some of the landforms found in the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Choose one of the landforms and create a podcast or multimedia presentation on that particular landform.  Focus on the physical characteristics of the landform, what makes it different from other landforms, and how the landforms affect people, plants and animals.

A Collage of Coins

Subject Area

Science, Art

Summary

Collages are art forms that can be used to show information and how different ideas are connected with each other.  Research an animal or plant found in one of the different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Create a collage illustrating the plant or animal's place in the food web and how it is affected by the climate or human intervention.

Fire Can be Good

Subject Area

Science

Summary

Prescribed fires are a way of keeping the ecosystem of a park or forest flourishing.  Research prescribed fires and identify the effects on the environment at the US Forest Service website or the National Park Service site.  Imagine that you are the expert and are being interviewed by a news reporter about the process, planning, execution and effects of prescribed fires in a site of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Make a video or audio recording of the news interview.

Pick Me!

Subject Area

Social Studies

Summary

One of the personal traits of a good citizen is volunteering in the community.  Different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins often have positions for volunteers.  Research these volunteer opportunities.  Create a print, video, or audio advertisement that identifies positions that are available at the sites of national significance for volunteers.  Create a help wanted ad for one of the positions.

Trading Cards

Subject Area

Social Studies, Language Arts

Summary of Lesson Plan Starter

The United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters® Program features designs depicting national parks and other national sites.  Choose one of the quarters and research its national site.  Design a "trading" card with the name of the national site on one side and a list of facts about it on the other side.

Water is Everywhere

Subject Area

Social Studies, Science

Summary

A variety of water features can be found at the sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Research the different water features found at one of these sites and create a magazine ad that shows the importance and influence of water to that national site.

A Thousand Words

Subject Areas

Language Arts

Summary

The sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins are places of beauty.  Research a site and find some words used to describe it.  Look at the pictures on the website and brainstorm words the pictures make you think of.  Create a word (tag) cloud using the words that you wrote down.  A word cloud is made of many words.  The words that are most important are larger.  The words make the shape of a cloud.  Share your word (tag) cloud with the class.

Where Did They Come From?

Subject Area

Science

Summary

What is an invasive species?  Why is it called an invasive species?  What effect does it have on native species in the park or forest?  Research an invasive species found in different sites of national significance depicted on the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program coins.  Create a print, video, or audio advertisement describing the effects of these invaders on the ecosystem of the park or forest.

There are no modification options for this lesson plan.
  • Create a rubric using the rubric template, have students create a rubric, or use your favorite rubric modified for each lesson plan idea.  Rubric categories could include historical accuracy of information, grammar and mechanics, creativity, and overall quality of presentation.  If desired, each student could create a fifth category targeting the unique attributes of his/her product.
  • While the lesson starters above are designed to be utilized with technology assignments can also be written.  Some great technology infusion ideas include creating podcasts, recording video presentations, creating student-designed websites to showcase student work, and making dynamic multimedia presentations.
  • Self, peer, and teacher evaluations should be utilized.  Have students share their work outside of class to gain additional feedback.
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 7.SP Statistics and Probability
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population
Standards:

  • 7.SP.1. Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.
  • 7.SP.2. Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an unknown characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the same size to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions.
    • For example, estimate the mean word length in a book by randomly sampling words from the book; predict the winner of a school election based on randomly sampled survey data. Gauge how far off the estimate or prediction might be.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 9-12 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Develop and evaluate inferences and predictions that are based on data.
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

In grades 9–12 all students should

  • use simulations to explore the variability of sample statistics from a known population and to construct sampling distributions;
  • understand how sample statistics reflect the values of population parameters and use sampling distributions as the basis for informal inference;
  • evaluate published reports that are based on data by examining the design of the study, the appropriateness of the data analysis, and the validity of conclusions; and
  • understand how basic statistical techniques are used to monitor process characteristics in the workplace.

Discipline: Mathematics
Domain: 9-12 Data Analysis and Probability
Cluster: Formulate questions that can be addressed with data and collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer them.
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

In grades 9–12 all students should

  • understand the differences among various kinds of studies and which types of inferences can legitimately be drawn from each;
  • know the characteristics of well-designed studies, including the role of randomization in surveys and experiments;
  • understand the meaning of measurement data and categorical data, of univariate and bivariate data, and of the term variable;
  • understand histograms, parallel box plots, and scatterplots and use them to display data; and
  • compute basic statistics and understand the distinction between a statistic and a parameter.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Knowledge to Language
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Using Technological Information
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Time, Continuity, and Change
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer and the evidence they use
  • help learners apply key concepts such as time, chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity
  • enable learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within and across cultures, including but not limited to, the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the emergence of religious belief systems, the rise of nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions
  • guide learners in using such processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct and interpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating and weighing evidence for claims, searching for causality, and distinguishing between events and developments that are significant and those that are inconsequential
  • provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment; and enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

Discipline: Science
Domain: 9-12 Content Standards
Cluster: Earth and Space Science
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Energy in the Earth system
  • Geochemical cycles
  • Origin and evolution of the Earth system
  • Origin and evolution of the universe

Discipline: Science
Domain: 9-12 Content Standards
Cluster: Life Science
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • The cell
  • Molecular basis of heredity
  • Biological evolution
  • Interdependence of organisms
  • Matter, energy, and organization in living systems
  • Behavior of organisms

Discipline: Science
Domain: 9-12 Content Standards
Cluster: Science and Technology
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Technological design ability
  • Understand science and technology

Discipline: Science
Domain: 9-12 Content Standards
Cluster: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Personal and community health
  • Population growth
  • Natural resources
  • Environmental quality
  • Natural and human induced hazards
  • Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 9-12 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 6: Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Proficient:

  • Students compare the materials, technologies, media, and processes of the visual arts with those of other arts disciplines as they are used in creation and types of analysis
  • Students compare characteristics of visual arts within a particular historical period or style with ideas, issues, or themes in the humanities or sciences

Advanced:

  • Students synthesize the creative and analytical principles and techniques of the visual arts and selected other arts disciplines, the humanities, or the sciences

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 9-12 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 4: Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Proficient:

  • Students differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
  • Students describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places
  • Students analyze relationships of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture, justifying conclusions made in the analysis and using such conclusions to inform their own art making

Advanced:

  • Students analyze and interpret artworks for relationships among form, context, purposes, and critical models, showing understanding of the work of critics, historians, aestheticians, and artists
  • Students analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 9-12 Visual Arts
Cluster: Standard 1: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Proficient:

  • Students apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient skill, confidence, and sensitivity that their intentions are carried out in their artworks
  • Students conceive and create works of visual art that demonstrate an understanding of how the communication of their ideas relates to the media, techniques, and processes they use

Advanced:

  • Students communicate ideas regularly at a high level of effectiveness in at least one visual arts medium
  • Students initiate, define, and solve challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Technology Operations and Concepts
Cluster: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Understand and use technology systems
  • Select and use applications effectively and productively
  • Troubleshoot systems and applications
  • Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Research and Information Fluency
Cluster: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks
  • Process data and report results

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Civic Ideals and Practices
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • assist learners in understanding the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law
  • guide learner efforts to identify, analyze, interpret, and evaluate sources and examples of citizens’ rights and responsibilities
  • facilitate learner efforts to locate, access, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about selected public issues—identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view and taking reasoned positions on such issues
  • provide opportunities for learners to practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic
  • help learners to analyze and evaluate the influence of various forms of citizen action on public policy
  • prepare learners to analyze a variety of public policies and issues from the perspective of formal and informal political actors
  • guide learners as they evaluate the effectiveness of public opinion in influencing and shaping public policy development and decision-making
  • encourage learner efforts to evaluate the degree to which public policies and citizen behaviors reflect or foster the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
  • support learner efforts to construct policy statements and action plans to achieve goals related to issues of public concern
  • create opportunities for learner participation in activities to strengthen the “common good,” based upon careful evaluation of possible options for citizen action

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Research
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. 

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Power, Authority, and Governance
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to examine the rights and responsibilities of the individual in relation to their families, their social groups, their community, and their nation; help students to understand the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified
  • provide opportunities for learners to examine issues involving the rights, roles, and status of individuals in relation to the general welfare
  • enable learners to describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity affecting order and security
  • have learners explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among nations
  • help learners to analyze and explain governmental mechanisms to meet the needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
  • have learners identify and describe the basic features of the American political system, and identify representative leaders from various levels and branches of government
  • challenge learners to apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, democratic values, and influence to the examination of persistent issues and social problems guide learners to explain and evaluate how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals at home and abroad

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Print/Non-print Texts
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Effective Communication
Grade(s): Grades 9–12
Standards:

  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

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