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My Favorite Habitat

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Summary

The teacher will introduce the concept of habitats as well as model the characteristics of a habitat. Students will then research how many national sites are located in their state as well as in one other state. Students will choose two habitats to compare on a Venn diagram, and will create an illustration of one of the habitats.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America The Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the general characteristics of habitats.
  • Students will describe and compare and illustrate specific habitats.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Science

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies
  • Technology

Grades

  • Kindergarten
  • First grade

Class Time

Sessions: Two
Session Length: 20-30 minutes
Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • Habitat
  • Venn diagram
  • National site
  • Food
  • Water
  • Shelter
  • Space

Materials

  • "What Type of Habitats?" worksheet (1 per student)
  • Images of five quarters featuring national sites
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives information about habitats, such as:
    • I See A Kookaburra! by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page
    • The ABC's of Habitats by Bobbie Kalman
    • About Habitats Series by Cathryn Sill
  • Chart paper
  • Writing materials
  • Digital drawing software program
  • Computer access

Preparations

  • Print out and copy relevant materials.
  • Identify exactly which national sites you would like students to research, or narrow the selection, as some national sites may have more habitats than others.  Bookmark relevant Web sites, such as National Park Service:  www.nps.gov.
  • Make sure to model for the students on a projector how to complete a Venn diagram.  Create your own sample Venn diagram in the software program that you can show.
  • Fill in the name of a national site and the habitats and animals found there on the "What Types of Habitats?" worksheet ahead of time.
  • Create a template on the software program you will be using to help students complete the Venn diagram and illustrations.

Worksheets and Files

  1. Read the students the chosen text on habitats.  Review the various characteristics of a habitat and record these on a chart.  Generate a class list of examples of habitats seen in the text.  Address and highlight any unfamiliar or new vocabulary from the text and record it on a chart.
  2. Model creating a Venn diagram with the students (for instance, compare two students' clothing, two book covers, two lunch boxes).  Then compare two habitats from the text and create a class Venn diagram.
  3. Describe the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program for background information.  The program is described at www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/atb/.  Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and "obverse" is another name for the front.
  4. With the students, examine five quarter designs (plus your state's, if available).  Locate your state on a classroom map then locate each of the other five sites on the map.  Note the other states' locations in relation to your school's location.  Demonstrate how to find the national sites located in each state, using your own state as an example.  Answer any student questions.
  5. Explain to the students that they will be creating two projects:  1) a Venn diagram comparing two different habitats, and 2) an illustration of one habitat.  Allow the students to pick a national site from among those discussed to research.  Give them time to research habitats found at the site.  Have them record their research on the "What Types of Habitats?" worksheet.
  6. Have the students choose and compare two habitats using a Venn diagram.
  7. Have the students choose one habitat and create an illustration of the habitat referring to their "What Types of Habitats?" worksheets.  Allow them to use digital drawing software if available.  Have them present the Venn diagrams and illustrations to the class.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Allow students to use a scribe to label their worksheets.
  • Allow students to use a template to complete the project.
  • Perform the research as a class, then allow students to complete the Venn diagrams and habitat illustrations independently.
  • Take anecdotal notes about the students' participation in class discussions.
  • Use the students' worksheets and projects to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.
There are no related resources for this lesson plan.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.1.7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • RL.1.8. Not applicable to literature.
  • RL.1.9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.1 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.1.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
  • W.1.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.1.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RL.K.7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).  
  • RL.K.8. not applicable to literature.
  • RL.K.9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Literature
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RL.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
  • RL.K.3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.K.7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a favorite author and express opinions about them).
  • W.K.8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • W.K.9. begins in grade 4.

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Research and Information Fluency
Cluster: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks
  • Process data and report results

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Research
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. 

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Print/Non-print Texts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. 

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

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