Commemorative Coin Programs

Congress authorizes commemorative coins that celebrate and honor American people, places, events, and institutions. Although these coins are legal tender, they are not minted for general circulation. Each commemorative coin is produced by the United States Mint in limited quantity and is only available for a limited time.

As well as commemorating important aspects of American history and culture, these coins help raise money for important causes. Part of the price of these coins is a surcharge that goes to organizations and projects that benefit the community. For example, surcharges on the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center commemorative coins helped build a new visitor center under the U.S. Capitol’s East Plaza.

Since the modern commemorative coin program began in 1982, the United States Mint has raised more than $506,301,189 in surcharges to help build new museums, maintain national monuments like the Vietnam War Memorial, preserve historical sites like George Washington’s home, support various Olympic programs, and much more.

Watch this video to learn more about the 2018 Breast Cancer Awareness Commemorative Coin Program.

Commemorative Coin Programs

2019 Commemorative Coins

2018 Commemorative Coins

2017 Commemorative Coins

2016 Commemorative Coins

2015 Commemorative Coins

2014 Commemorative Coins

2013 Commemorative Coins

2012 Commemorative Coins

2011 Commemorative Coins

2010 Commemorative Coins

2009 Commemorative Coins

2008 Commemorative Coins

2007 Commemorative Coins

2006 Commemorative Coins

2005 Commemorative Coins

2004 Commemorative Coins

2003 Commemorative Coins

2002 Commemorative Coins

2001 Commemorative Coins

2000 Commemorative Coins

1999 Commemorative Coins

1998 Commemorative Coins

1997 Commemorative Coins

1996 Commemorative Coins

1995 Commemorative Coins

1994 Commemorative Coins

1993 Commemorative Coins

1992 Commemorative Coins

1991 Commemorative Coins

1990 Commemorative Coins

1989

1988 Commemorative Coins

1987 Commemorative Coins

1986 Commemorative Coins

1984

1983

1982 Commemorative Coins

Commemorative Coins from 1892-1954

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Compliance Procedures for Surcharge Eligibility and Payments

Commemorative coin programs are created by enabling legislation enacted by Congress to honor a person, place or event. The enabling legislation dictates the coin specifications, mintages, cost considerations, and surcharge amount to be collected. A surcharge is a set amount per coin that the Mint collects and distributes to the designated recipient organization which must use the proceeds for the purpose(s) specified in the enabling legislation. Historically, the Mint has been required to pay surcharges to recipients whether or not all the Mint’s program costs were recovered and without any accountability requirements for the recipient organization. In 1996, Congress enacted legislation changing the Mint’s requirement to pay surcharges.

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