Courageous Builders

Summary

Students will define and give examples of courageousness. Students will describe the job of an ironworker and the related challenges.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will define and give examples of courageousness. Students will describe the job of an ironworker and the related challenges.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts

Grades

  • K
  • 1st

Class Time

  • Sessions: Two
  • Session Length: 20-30 minutes
  • Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of writing and drawing to communicate ideas.
 

Terms and Concepts

  • Native
  • American $1 Coin
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front) Kahnawake Mohawk
  • Akwesasne Mohawk
  • Skyscraper
  • High iron construction
  • Ironworker
  • Courageousness
     

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector or other classroom technology (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "2015 Native American $1 Coin" page
  • Copies of the following:
    • "High in the Sky" worksheet
    • "Being Courageous" worksheet
    • "Ironworker Checklist" worksheet
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate fiction text that tells a story about a character that was courageous
  • Chart paper
  • Markers, pencils and crayons

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "2015 Native American $1 Coin" page.
  • Make copies of the following:
    • "High in the Sky" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Being Courageous" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "Ironworker Checklist" worksheet (1 per student)
  • Locate a fiction text that tells a story about a character that was courageous
  • Gather print or digital images of ironworkers building skyscrapers

Worksheets

Worksheets and files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

Session 1

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
  2. Display the "2015 Native American Coin Reverse" overhead transparency or photocopy. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the "reverse", and "obverse" is another name for the front.
  3. Ask the students to examine the coin image and tell you what they see in this image. Explain to the students that the theme of this coin is "Mohawk Ironworkers" as can be seen written on the coin. Have students brainstorm what is happening in the image and where it might be taking place.
  4. Explain to the students that this coin image honors two Native American communities, the Kahnawake Mohawk and Akwesasne Mohawk, for their "high iron" construction work as ironworkers and the building of skyscrapers in New York City. Write each of the key terms on chart paper and record the definitions.
    • Kahnawake Mohawk and Akwesasne Mohawk – Native American communities from which many ironworkers came
    • Skyscraper – a very tall building
    • High iron construction – construction work high in the sky to build skyscrapers
    • Ironworker – workers who build steel structures
  5. Display the gathered images of Mohawk ironworkers on top of skyscrapers being built. Guide the students to describe what they see. Record responses on chart paper.
  6. Explain to the students that the Mohawk ironworkers were well-known for being very courageous. Define courageousness as having courage even in danger and add this term to the chart paper.
  7. Using a Think-Pair-Share format, ask the students to discuss and share their ideas why it was so important for the Mohawk ironworkers to be courageous.
  8. Using a Think-Pair-Share format, ask the students to discuss and share their ideas about how the Mohawk ironworkers might have felt at the top of the skyscraper.
  9. Distribute the "High in the Sky" worksheet. Explain that students should draw a picture of themselves on top of a skyscraper and complete the framed sentence.
  10. Allow the students time to complete their worksheets and then share their completed work with the class. Explain to the students that in the next session they will be discussing a time each of them were courageous.

Session 2

  1. Display the "2015 Native American $1 Coin Reverse" image. Review with the students the material covered in the previous session, including the term definitions, the "High in the Sky" worksheets and the skyscraper construction images.
  2. Review the importance of the Mohawk ironworkers to the building of American skyscrapers. Discuss the courageousness of the Mohawk ironworkers and why this was important to their job.
  3. Introduce the students to the selected text and explain to them that it includes a character that needed to be courageous. Using a Think-Pair-Share format, ask the students to discuss and share their ideas about who might need to be courageous and why in the story.
  4. Read the text aloud and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary. Lead a class discussion on the courageousness of the characters.
  5. Ask the students to think about a time they were courageous. As students share their ideas, make a list on chart paper.
  6. Distribute the "Being Courageous" worksheet. Explain to students that they will think about a time they were courageous then write and draw a picture about that time on the worksheet.
  7. Allow the students time to complete their worksheets and then share their completed work with the class.
  8. Distribute the "Ironworker Checklist" and ask the students to reflect on their own learning and understanding.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to dictate their responses.
  • Provide a word bank for students to use in their writing.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students learn about famous Americans who demonstrated courageousness.
  • Have students learn about other important building jobs in the community.
  • Have students learn more about Native Americans through other Native American $1 Coin lesson plans for kindergarten through first grade.
     

Assess

  • Take anecdotal notes about the students' participation in class discussions.
  • Evaluate the students' worksheets and checklist for understanding of the lesson objectives.
     

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.1 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.1.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
    • Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
    • Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • SL.1.2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • SL.1.3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.1 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.1.4. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • SL.1.5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
  • SL.1.6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 1 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.K Writing
Grade(s): Grade 1
Cluster: Text Types and Purposes
Standards:

  • W.K.1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).
  • W.K.2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • W.K.3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.

National Standards

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: People, Places, and Environment
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • Enable learners to use, interpret, and distinguish various representations of Earth such as maps, globes, and photographs, and to use appropriate geographic tools
  • Encourage learners to construct, use, and refine maps and mental maps, calculate distance, scale, area, and density, and organize information about people, places, regions, and environments in a spatial context
  • Help learners to locate, distinguish, and describe the relationships among varying regional and global patterns of physical systems such as landforms, climate, and natural resources, and explain changes in the physical systems
  • Guide learners in exploring characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations on Earth’s surface
  • Have learners describe how people create places that reflect culture, human needs, current values and ideals, and government policies
  • Provide opportunities for learners to examine, interpret, and analyze interactions of human beings and their physical environments, and to observe and analyze social and economic effects of environmental changes, both positive and negative
  • Challenge learners to consider, compare, and evaluate existing uses of resources and land in communities, regions, countries, and the world
  • Direct learners to explore ways in which Earth’s physical features have changed over time, and describe and assess ways historical events have influenced and been influenced by physical and human geographic features

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Science, Technology, and Society
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to identify, describe, and examine both current and historical examples of the interaction and interdependence of science, technology, and society in a variety of cultural settings
  • provide opportunities for learners to make judgments about how science and technology have transformed the physical world and human society and our understanding of time, space, place, and human-environment interactions
  • have learners analyze the way in which science and technology influence core societal values, beliefs, and attitudes and how societal attitudes influence scientific and technological endeavors
  • prompt learners to evaluate various policies proposed to deal with social changes resulting from new technologies
  • help learners to identify and interpret various perspectives about human societies and the physical world using scientific knowledge, technologies, and an understanding of ethical standards of this and other cultures
  • encourage learners to formulate strategies and develop policy proposals pertaining to science/technology-society issues