Effigy Mounds National Monument: Shapes and Symbols

Summary

Students will identify the 2017 Effigy Mounds National Monument America the Beautiful Quarter reverse, correctly name its geometric shape, identify symbols within the design and recall experiences to create a new coin.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America the Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

Students will identify the 2017 Effigy Mounds National Monument America the Beautiful Quarter reverse, correctly name its geometric shape, identify symbols within the design and recall experiences to create a new coin.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art

Grades

  • K
  • 1st

Class Time

  • Sessions: One
  • Session Length: 30-45 minutes
  • Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of primitive shapes. Students should also have a basic understanding of Native Americans and symbols (flags, smartphone icons, etc.)

Terms and Concepts

  • Symbolism
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)

Materials

Preparations

Lesson Steps

  1. Display and examine the 2017 Effigy Mounds National Monument quarter reverse image.
  2. As a group, ask students to identify the shape of the coin as round, or a circle.
  3. Using circulating coin images printed from preparation, have students cut and categorize coins by size and type, counting the amount in each group. Conclude that all the coins are made of the circle shape.
  4. Explain that the U.S. Mint makes coins and that all U.S. coins are circles when viewed from above.
  5. Using the circulating coin images printed out in preparations, have the students identify all the coins as circles while identifying the differences in size.
  6. Display the 2017 Effigy Mounds National Monument quarter reverse once again. Explain that this coin is worth twenty-five cents.
  7. Ask the students to guess what the imagery on the coin means.
  8. Explain that each part of the image represents a symbol and that symbols are images or objects that can mean something else. Give general examples from items in the class.
  9. Referencing the coin design, explain that the symbols represent a bird and two bears and that some Native American tribal stories explain that the bear is the guardian of the Earth and the bird as the guardian of the sky.
  10. Hand out the blank sheets and have students create a circle to fill the sheet.
  11. Have students design a coin using a symbol of their choice. Ask the students to recall or remember something special to them and then draw a picture to symbolize it. This can be an event, place or person(s).
  12. Using the guide on U.S. Mint coins, explain that their coin design must have the following: One symbol, the amount their coin is worth and their initials as the artist.
  13. Have the students complete the checklist as they work.
  14. Have students present their coins.
  15. Collect the checklists.

Differentiated Learning Options

Have premade coin templates printed in advance using the Kids’ Baseball Coin Design Challenge Template

Have students work in pairs or groups.

Enrichments/Extensions

Print additional sheets of the circulating coin images from preparations and have students use cutouts of the coins as currency in a Financial Literacy Unit.

Arrange a showing using a public space in the school to display the coins.

Assess

Symbolism: Effigy Mounds National Monument Checklist

Name:_____________________________

Directions: Circle each as you complete.

 

I used a symbol in my coin design.

 

I added a value to my coin.

 

I signed my name on my coin.

 

 

 

 

Symbolism: Effigy Mounds National Monument Checklist

Name:_____________________________

Directions: Circle each as you complete.

 

I used a symbol in my coin design.

 

I added the year on my coin.

 

I signed my initials on my coin.

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.7 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.7.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.7.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 7.)
  • W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.8 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.8.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.8.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8.)
  • W.8.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

National Standards

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 5-8 Theater
Cluster: Standard 2: Acting by developing basic acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students analyze descriptions, dialogue, and actions to discover, articulate, and justify character motivation and invent character behaviors based on the observation of interactions, ethical choices, and emotional responses of people
  • Students demonstrate acting skills (such as sensory recall, concentration, breath control, diction, body alignment, control of isolated body parts) to develop characterizations that suggest artistic choices
  • Students in an ensemble, interact as the invented characters

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Production, Distribution, and Consumption
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to explain how the scarcity of productive resources (human, capital, technological, and natural) requires the development of economic systems to make decisions about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed
  • help learners analyze the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system
  • help learners compare the costs and benefits to society of allocating goods and services through private and public means
  • assist learners in understanding the relationships among the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems such as households, businesses, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations
  • guide learner analysis of the role of specialization and exchange in economic processes
  • provide opportunities for learners to assess how values and beliefs influence private and public economic decisions in different societies
  • have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital
  • challenge learners to apply economic concepts and reasoning when evaluating historical and contemporary social developments and issues
  • enable learners to distinguish between domestic and global economic systems, and explain how the two interact
  • guide learners in the application of economic concepts and principles in the analysis of public issues such as the allocation of health care or the consumption of energy, and in devising economic plans for accomplishing socially desirable outcomes related to such issues
  • help learners critically examine the values and assumptions underlying the theories and models of economics
  • help learners to distinguish between economics as a field of inquiry and the economy

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Using Technological Information
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.