Lights! Camera! Hospitality!

Summary

Using media to convey interactions between Native Americans and Lewis and Clark.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will identify and describe the interactions between the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Native American tribes. Students will collaboratively develop and deliver a presentation.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts
  • Technology
  • Economics

Grades

  • 7th
  • 8th

Class Time

  • Sessions: Five
  • Session Length: 45-60 minutes
  • Total Length: 151-500 minutes

    Groupings

    • Whole group
    • Small groups
    • Individual work

    Background Knowledge

    • Motives
    • Obstacles
    • Accomplishments
    • Provisions
    • Economics
    • Movie Trailers
    • Movie Production

    Terms and Concepts

    • Native American $1 Coin
    • Reverse (back)
    • Obverse (front)
    • Natural Resources
    • Hospitality

    Materials

    • 1 overhead projector or equivalent technology (optional)
    • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:
    • Copies of the following:
      • "Economic Flow" worksheet
      • "Movie Trailer Homework"" worksheet
      • "Exit Slip" worksheet
      • "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet
      • "Filmmaking Guide" worksheet
      • "Hospitality Movie Rubric"
      • Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Lesson Plans Resource Guide (p. 5)
      • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" information page
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture, such as:
      • Meet Lydia: A Native Girl from Southeast Alaska by Miranda Belarde-Lewis
      • Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes: Nine Indian Writers on the Legacy of the Expedition by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.
      • When the Rain Sings: Poems by Young Native Americans by the National Museum of the American Indian
    • Chart paper
    • Markers
    • Video capture or similar technology

    Preparations

    •  Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of each of the following:
    • Make copies of each of the following:
      • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" page (1 per student).
      • "Economic Flow" worksheet
      • "Movie Trailer Homework" worksheet (1 per student)
      • "Exit Slips" (1 per student, cut in half for Session 1 and Session 2)
      • "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet (1 per student)
      • "Filmmaking Guide" worksheet (1 per student)
      • "Hospitality Movie Rubric" (1 per student)
      • "Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Lesson Plans Resource Guide" (p. 5) (as many as desired to hand out, or make a projection copy)
      • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" information page (as many as desired to hand out, or make a projection copy)
    • Locate a text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture (see examples under "Materials").
    • Reserve computer lab for Sessions 1 through 4.
    • Prepare video camera or similar technology for recording.
    • Locate and bookmark online resources for student research on the Lewis and Clark Expedition motives and Native American motives, such as:

    Worksheets

    Worksheets and files (PDF)

    Lesson Steps

    Session 1

    1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
    2. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" overhead transparency or photocopy. Examine the coin design with the students and identify the 2014 theme "Native Hospitality Ensured the Success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition."
    3. Tell the students that the front of a coin is called the "obverse" and the back is called the "reverse." Ask the students to share their ideas about the image on the coin's reverse to include the compass and the peace pipe. Record student responses on chart paper.
    4. Ask the students to identify the provisions that the woman is holding in the image. List the provisions on the chart paper. Ask the students to identify where the provisions came from. Lead the students to conclude that these are natural resources. Distribute the "Economic Flow" worksheet. Define the term natural resources on the "Economic Flow" worksheet as materials supplied by nature.
    5. Tell the students they will be reading a nonfiction article to help them learn about the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Distribute or display the Westward Journey Nickel Series™ Lesson Plans Resource Guide (p. 5). Review the definition of "motive." Remind the students to look for the motives or purposes of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Have the students read the article.
    6. Lead a class discussion on the motives of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Record student responses on chart paper. Lead the students to conclude that the main motives for the expedition were to search for a water route to the Pacific Ocean, to map the land, and to establish friendly relationships with the tribes living along the route.
    7. Divide the class into small groups. Have the students discuss the possible reactions of Native Americans in meeting the expedition and the challenges Lewis and Clark faced trying to communicate with them.
    8. Have student groups record ideas from their discussions on chart paper and share them with the class.
    9. Display the map overlays from the Resource Guide (pp. 23–25) of the journey and the location of the Native American tribes. Lead a class discussion on the maps.
    10. Distribute or display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" information page. Have the students read the page. Remind students to look for motives for the expedition to reinforce or add to those on the chart.
    11. Lead a class discussion on the theme "hospitality." Discuss the term and develop a definition. Define "hospitality" on the "Economic Flow" worksheet. Have the students provide possible examples of hospitality encountered by both the Native American tribes and Lewis and Clark and how communication differences might have presented challenges.
    12. Lead a class discussion on the possible reasons the Native Americans were being hospitable. Record the answers on chart paper.
    13. Tell the students they will be visiting some Web sites to find possible motives for the Native American hospitality. Assign a group of students one site to research and report on to the class. Allow students time to use the computers for research.
    14. Record results from the research on chart paper. Lead the students to conclude that the Native Americans were curious, interested in trading with the explorers, and had plenty of natural resources to trade with them.
    15. Lead a class discussion on the trading and interactions between the expedition and the Native Americans. Discuss the blacksmith who was with the explorers and why it was important to bring him along. Lead the students to conclude that he produced goods that could be traded and he repaired broken items and tools. Tell the students that the Native Americans had access to many natural resources including intelligence about where to find different sources of food. Lead the students to conclude that the trade was circular.
    16. Explain to the students that they will be rereading the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" information page, the Resource Guide page, and the bookmarked Web sites to find the information for completing the diagram. Allow time for the students to use words from the word bank to fill in the "Economic Flow" worksheet.
    17. After the students have finished, collect the "Economic Flow" worksheet.
    18. Ask the students whether they have seen a movie or TV show trailer. Distribute the "Movie Trailer Homework" sheet. Tell the students they are to watch TV and look for trailers for upcoming shows or movies to answer the questions on the worksheet. Discuss the questions with the class.
    19. Distribute the "Session 1 Exit Slip." Have the students complete the Exit Slip.
    20. Collect the slips and check them for accuracy. Check the "Economics Flow" worksheets for accuracy before the next session.

    Session 2

    1. Review the charts and worksheets from the previous session. Review the motives for the hospitality of the expedition and the Native Americans. Distribute the "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet.
    2. Discuss the concepts of motive, obstacles, and accomplishments.
    3. Have the students read the directions on the "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet. Identify a recently read or well known book or story. Identify the motive for the main character, the obstacles they had to overcome, and what they accomplished. Complete the "example" diagram on the "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet with the students using the information from the story.
    4. Lead a class discussion about personal accomplishments. Have the students record an accomplishment of their own in the "personal" diagram of the worksheet.
    5. Have the students reread the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" information page, the Resource Guide page, and the bookmarked online resources to determine the motives, obstacles, and accomplishments of the Lewis and Clark Expedition and the Native Americans. Review charts from the previous session. Have the students complete the "Lewis and Clark" diagram of the worksheet.
    6. Collect the "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet.
    7. On chart paper, list responses from the "Movie Trailer Homework" sheet. Discuss the ways in which different forms of media advertise a movie or television show. Ask the students if the trailers show everything about the movie or show. Ask the students whether the trailer tells you the ending or not. Ask the students how much it shows. Ask the students the length of a trailer.
    8. Lead a class discussion about creating a movie and the people involved in making a movie. Record student responses on chart paper. Lead students to conclude that many resources, including economic and human, are needed to make a movie. Remind them of the length of a movie's closing credits. Lead the students to conclude that it takes many roles to make a movie besides the visible actors and actresses. Ask what other roles they can name. Write student responses on chart paper.
    9. Lead a discussion of the elements of a movie or video and the economics involved with the making of a film. Lead a class discussion about what it might have been like if a movie crew had followed Lewis and Clark on their journey.
    10. Explain that someone may want to create a documentary, movie, TV show, or play about the hospitality commemorated by the coin, particularly from the perspective of the Native Americans. Explain that the presentation would focus on the hospitality of the Native Americans, the economic interactions between the two groups, and the all the motives, obstacles, and accomplishments involved. Before the presentation is released to the public, there needs to be a trailer to advertise it, and that the students will be making that trailer.
    11. Explain that the trailer needs to focus on the perspective of the Native Americans and the effects the interactions had on them. Emphasize the importance of treating the subject as accurately and respectfully as possible when writing and preparing the trailer. They will be working in groups of 8 to 10 with each student having a role to play in making the trailer.
    12. Distribute the "Filmmaking Guide" and the "Hospitality Movie Rubric." Review the rubric and discuss the questions and guidelines for producing the video or play.
    13. Tell the students they will need to write a summary of the script for the movie so they know what to write in the script for the trailer. Explain that everyone will be part of the writing process, although one or two students in each group will be the main script writers.
    14. Discuss the importance of telling the story's concept in 30 to 60 seconds. Emphasize the need for setting the tone early and getting to the point quickly. Emphasize the use of framing people for emotional impact and using close-ups. Emphasize the use of the "Economic Flow" worksheet, the "Lights! Camera! Hospitality!" worksheet, and the charts when writing the script.
    15. Distribute the "Session 2 Exit Slip." Have the students complete the exit slip.
    16. Check the Exit Slips and worksheets for accuracy.

    Sessions 3 and 4

    1. Return the worksheets to the students. Remind them to first write the movie summary, then the trailer script.
    2. Allow time for the students to write their scripts and shoot (and edit) their trailer.

    Session 5

    1. Have the students view their projects with a cinematic viewing session.
    2. Host an awards show with films receiving Best Picture, Best Script, etc.
    3. Have the students complete the rubric and turn it in.

    Differentiated Learning Options

    • Allow students to work in pairs.
    • Have the students use video and audio resources for information to complete the worksheets.
    • Prepare a basic script for which students can supply the details.

    Enrichments/Extensions

    • Use the first exit slip on the economic interactions and the "Economic Flow" worksheet to introduce the ideas of using money and how it changes the dynamics of an interaction. Help to build a model of circular flow.
    • Have the students complete the "Live with Lewis and Clark" lesson plan for grades 7 and 8.

    Assess

    Use the worksheets, exit slips, and rubric to evaluate whether the students have met the lesson objectives.

    Common Core Standards

    Discipline: Language Arts
    Domain: RL.7 Reading: Literature
    Grade(s): Grade 7
    Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
    Standards:

    • RL.7.7. Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).
    • RL.7.8. not applicable to literature.
    • RL.7.9. Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

    Discipline: Language Arts
    Domain: W.7 Writing
    Grade(s): Grade 7
    Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
    Standards:

    • W.7.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.
    • W.7.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
    • W.7.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      • Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history”).
      • Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims”).

    National Standards

    This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.