Rebirth of the Longleaf Pine Forests

Summary

Students will explore the history of Longleaf pine forests. Students will investigate methods of conservation used in forest ecosystems.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America the Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

Students will explore the history of Longleaf pine forests. Students will investigate methods of conservation used in forest ecosystems.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Science
  • Technology

Grades

  • 4th
  • 5th
  • 6th

Class Time

  • Sessions: Six
  • Session Length: 45-60 minutes
  • Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Pairs

Background Knowledge

  • Forest ecosystems
  • Wildlife interaction
  • Human interaction
  • Presentation software

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)
  • Longleaf pine forest
  • Restoration
  • Undergrowth
  • Forest residue

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector or equivalent technology
  • 1 overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "Kisatchie National Forest Quarter" page
  • 1 class map of the United States
  • Information and images about the Longleaf pine.
  • Map of Longleaf pine forests in the United States
  • Copies of the following:
    • "Pine Forest Happenings" worksheet.
    • "Pine Forest Happenings Answer key"
    • "Conservation in the Forest Readings" worksheet
    • "Conservation in the Forest Readings Answer Key"
    • "Conservation Presentation Rubric"
  • Age-appropriate websites that give information about Longleaf pine forests and forest conservation, such as:
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Crayons
  • Colored pencils
  • Computers with Internet access, presentation software, and printer access

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "Kisatchie National Forest Quarter" page
  • Make a chart divided into two columns labeled "What I Know" and "What I Learned"
  • Locate information and images about the Longleaf pine.
  • Locate a map of Longleaf pine forests in the United States.
  • Make copies of the following:
    • "Conservation in the Forest Readings"
    • "Pine Forest Happenings" worksheet. (1 per student).
    • "Conservation Presentation Rubric" (1 per student)
  • Arrange to use the computer lab or class set of portable technology for Session 2.
  • Locate forest ranger contact information for the Kisatchie National Forest and other local or state forest associations and parks. Locate a forest ranger to interact and correspond with students. Determine whether they would prefer questions from students to be emailed, print mailed with a self-addressed, stamped return envelope, or if they are interested in using live feed technology to communicate with the students in your classroom.
  • Bookmark websites that give information about Longleaf pine forests conservation methods.
  • Bookmark Internet sites for the Kisatchie National Forest and other local or state forest associations and parks.
  • For Session 2, divide the class into pairs and assign sections of the websites for each pair to read.

Worksheets

Worksheets and files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

Session 1

1. Display and examine the "Kisatchie National Forest Quarter" page. Locate this site on a class map. Note its position in relation to your school's location. As background information, explain to the students that the United States Mint began to issue the quarters in the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program in 2010. By the time the program ends in 2021, there will be a total of 56 designs. Each design will focus on a different national site—one from each state, territory and the District of Columbia.

2. Tell the students that the front of a coin is called the "obverse" and the back is called the "reverse." Ask the students to tell you what they see in the image on the quarter's reverse. Explain that the coin image depicts a wild turkey in flight over blue stem grass with Longleaf pine in the background. Tell the students that they are going to be learning about one special feature of Kisatchie National Forest, the Longleaf pine tree.

3. Display images of the Longleaf pine and provide background information. Include a map of where Longleaf pine forests are located and how the number of Longleaf pine forests has decreased.

4. Explain that they will be learning about Longleaf pine forests.

5. Using a chart, guide the students to list ideas related to ecosystem conservation in the "What I Know" section.

6. Distribute and review the "Pine Forest Happenings" worksheet. Introduce the students to the selected websites about conservation. Explain that they will be making notes on the worksheet about conservation based on what they learn from the selected websites.

7. Define (and write on chart paper) "undergrowth" as a dense growth of shrubs and other plants, especially under trees in a woodland. Define "forest residue" as the accumulation in the forest of living or mostly woody dead material.

8. Read the selected website text aloud. During the reading, discuss with the students ways they see wildlife, plants, and humans interacting with forests and how the forests may be affected. Record observations on the chart.

9. Collect the "Pine Forest Happenings" worksheet.

10. Explain to the students that in the next sessions they will be creating a presentation on conservation efforts that affect and the Longleaf pine.

Session 2

1. Display and review content from the previous session. Take students to the computer lab or use the class set of portable technology to read the information found in bookmarked websites related to conservation, like those listed under "Materials."

2. Distribute the "Conservation in the Forest Readings" worksheet. Explain that they will be making observations and recording interview questions while they read information from websites. Allow time for the students to record questions or observations on their worksheet.

3. Have the students use the websites to define unfamiliar words from their assigned readings and record them on their worksheets.

4. Collect the worksheets.

5. Tell the students that in the next session they will create a class list of interview questions for a ranger.

Sessions 3 and 4

1. Display and review materials from the previous sessions.

2. Allow students to work in pairs to generate interview questions related to conservation efforts for the rangers at the Kisatchie National Forest.

3. As a class, generate a manageable list of interview questions to ask the Kisatchie National Forest rangers.

4. Divide the class into small groups to present the questions in the manner chosen from the Preparation section.

Sessions 4 and 5

1. Conduct the interview.

2. After the interview, guide the students to discuss information that surprised them or changed any misconceptions or preconceived notions related to forest conservation. Record this information in the "What I Learned" section of the chart.

3. With the class, brainstorm other ways people might work to conserve forests. List conservation strategies on chart paper.

4. Distribute and review the "Conservation Presentation Rubric" to each student.

5. Allow time for the students to create digital or print presentations sharing the different conservation efforts being used in the forests they have chosen to research.

6. Explain to the students that they will share their presentations in the next session.?

Session 6

1. Allow time for the students to share digital or print presentations.

2. Allow time for the students to complete their rubrics.

3. Collect the rubrics.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work with a partner.
  • Allow students extended time to complete work.
  • Allow students to type interview questions and presentations on a computer.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students learn more about a different forest environment by visiting the "Rain, Rain, Everywhere" El Yunque National Forest quarter lesson plan for grades 4 through 6.
  • Arrange for students to contact other local, state, or national forests sites to interview or inquire about conservation methods used at those locations or allow them to use the computer lab or the class set of portable technology to research other conservation strategies/systems related to forest ecosystems.

Assess

  • Take anecdotal notes about the students' participation in class discussions and group activity.
  • Evaluate the students' worksheets for understanding of the lesson objectives.
  • Use the "Conservation Presentation Rubric" to evaluate students' presentations.

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.5 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Comprehension and Collaboration
Standards:

  • SL.5.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
    • Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
    • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
    • Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
    • Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
  • SL.5.2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
  • SL.5.3. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is supported by reasons and evidence.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: SL.5 Speaking and Listening
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • SL.5.4. Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  • SL.5.5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
  • SL.5.6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See grade 5 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.5 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.5.7. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • RI.5.8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
  • RI.5.9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.5 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Standards:

  • W.5.7. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
  • W.5.8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
  • W.5.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    • Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]”).
    • Apply grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]”).

National Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

Discipline: Science
Domain: NGSS-4-6 Next Generation Science Standard
Cluster: Earth and Space Science Disciplinary Core Concepts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • ESS2.D: Weather and Climate
  • ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems

Discipline: Science
Domain: NGSS-4-6 Next Generation Science Standard
Cluster: Life Science Disciplinary Core Concepts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • LS1.A: Structure and Function
  • LS2.A: Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems
  • LS2.C: Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Print/Non-print Texts
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works. 

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Research and Information Fluency
Cluster: Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Plan strategies to guide inquiry
  • Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media
  • Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks
  • Process data and report results

Discipline: Technology
Domain: All Technology Operations and Concepts
Cluster: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Understand and use technology systems
  • Select and use applications effectively and productively
  • Troubleshoot systems and applications
  • Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies