Symbolism in a Coin: Native American Code Talkers

Summary

Students will identify the 2016 Native American $1 Coin reverse, correctly name its geometric shape, identify symbols and recall experiences to create a coin.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will identify the 2016 Native American $1 Coin reverse, correctly name its geometric shape, identify symbols and recall experiences to create a coin.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art

Grades

  • K
  • 1st

Class Time

  • Sessions: One
  • Session Length: 30-45 minutes
  • Total Length: 0-45 minutes

Groupings

  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of geometric shapes. Students should also have a basic understanding of symbols (flags, smartphone icons, etc.).

Terms and Concepts

  • Native American $1 Coin
  • Code Talkers
  • Symbolism
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)

Materials

Preparations

Worksheets

Worksheets and Files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

  1. Display and examine the "2016 Native American $1 Coin" reverse image.
  2. As a group, ask students to identify the shape of the coin as a round, or a circle.
  3. Using circulating coin images printed from preparation, have students cut and categorize coins by size and type, counting the amount in each group. Conclude that all the coins are made of the circle shape.
  4. Explain that the U.S. Mint makes coins and that all U.S. coins are circles when viewed from above.
  5. Using the circulating coin images printed out in preparations, have the students identify all the coins as circles while identifying the differences in size.
  6. Display the "2016 Native American $1 Coin" reverse once again. Explain that this coin is worth as much as a dollar bill.
  7. Ask the students to guess what the imagery on the coin means.
  8. Explain that each part of the image represents a symbol and that symbols are images or objects that can mean something else. Give examples.
  9. Explain that the two helmets represent soldiers that fought in two different wars and that the feathers make a "V", symbolizing victory.
  10. Explain that, together, the helmets and feathers symbolize a special group of Native Americans that helped the U.S. save lives during two wars by using a special language that the enemy couldn't understand.
  11. Hand out the blank sheets and have students create a circle to fill the sheet.
  12. Have students design a coin using a symbol of their choice. Ask the students to recall or remember something special to them and then draw a picture to symbolize it. This can be an event, place or person(s).
  13. Explain that their coin design must have the following: One symbol, the amount their coin is worth and their first name.
  14. Have the students complete the checklist as they work.
  15. Have students present their coins.
  16. Collect the checklists.

Differentiated Learning Options

Have premade coin templates printed in advance.

Have students work in pairs or groups.

Enrichments/Extensions

Print additional sheets of the circulating coin images and have students use cutouts of the coins as currency in a Financial Literacy Unit.

Arrange a showing using a public space in the school to display the coins.

Assess

Symbolism: Native American Code Talkers Checklist

Name:_____________________________

Directions: Circle each as you complete.

I used a symbol in my coin design.

I added a value to my coin.

I signed my name on my coin.

 

 

 

Symbolism: Native American Code Talkers Checklist

Name:_____________________________

Directions: Circle each as you complete.

I used a symbol in my coin design.

I added the year on my coin.

I signed my name on my coin.

Common Core Standards

DisciplineMath
DomainK.G Geometry
Grade(s)Grade K 
ClusterIdentify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders and spheres)
Standards:

  • K.G.1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind and next to.
  • K.G.2. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
  • K.G.3. Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, "flat") or three-dimensional ("solid"). 

DisciplineMath
DomainK.G Geometry
Grade(s)Grade K 
ClusterClassify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
Standards:

  • K.MD.3. Classify Objects into given categories; count numbers of objects in each category and sort the category by count.

National Standards

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.