The Battle of Sullivan’s Island

Summary

The students will describe the role of William Jasper as a participant in the Battle of Sullivan's Island. The students will create a map of the Battle of Sullivan's Island using coordinate graphing.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America the Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

The students will describe the role of William Jasper as a participant in the Battle of Sullivan's Island. The students will create a map of the Battle of Sullivan's Island using coordinate graphing.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Math
  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts

Grades

  • 4th
  • 5th
  • 6th

Class Time

  • Sessions: Two
  • Session Length: 60 minutes
  • Total Length: 91-120 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of coordinate graphing and the American Revolution.

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)
  • Coordinate plane
  • x-axis
  • y-axis
  • origin
  • grid
  • ratio

Materials

  • One overhead projector or other classroom technology (optional)
  • One overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the America the Beautiful quarter reverse
  • Copies of the following worksheets:
    • "Attack on Sullivan's Island " worksheet (one per student)
    • "Battle Coordinates" worksheet (one per pair of students)
  • One class map of the United States
  • Chart paper and markers
  • Rulers
  • Locate age appropriate texts that give information about South Carolina's history in 1776, Fort Sullivan and palmettos
  • Locate websites that give information about South Carolina's history in 1776, Fort Sullivan, or palmettos

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the America the Beautiful quarter reverse.
  • Make copies of the following:
    • "Attack on Sullivan's Island" worksheet (one per student)
    • "Battle Coordinates" worksheet (one per pair of students)
  • Locate a text that gives basic information about South Carolina's history in 1776 or Sullivan's Island.
  • Bookmark Internet sites that contain information about South Carolina's history in 1776 or Sullivan's Island.
  • Locate a map of the modern day Charleston Harbor area. In 1776, according to the British plan of attack, there were multiple sand bars in the area preventing the ships from a direct attack on the city of Charleston. Locate an additional map of the harbor as the British mapped it in 1776.

Worksheets

Worksheets and files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

Session 1

Step 1. Display and examine the Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) reverse quarter design. Locate this site on a class map. Note its position in relation to your school's location. As background information, explain to the students that the United States Mint began to issue the quarters in the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program in 2010. By the time the program ends in 2021, there will be a total of 56 designs on the back of the coin. Each design will focus on a different national site—one from each state, territory and the District of Columbia.

Step 2. Tell the students that the front of a coin is called the "obverse" and the back is called the "reverse." Ask the students to tell you what they see in the image on the quarter's reverse. Explain that the coin image depicts Sergeant William Jasper recovering the flag designed by Colonel William Moultrie. Tell the students that they are going to be learning about the special features of Fort Moultrie (Fort Sumter National Monument) in South Carolina.

Step 3. Ask the students to examine the coin image again. Explain to the students that the image displays a moment in the middle of a battle. Ask students to describe what they notice in the image. Guide students to focus on how a battle is being depicted. Ask student to look at what natural features are depicted in the quarter's reverse. List student responses on chart paper.

Step 4. Explain that students will learn more about this battle by practicing graphing using a coordinate plane. A coordinate plane is determined by a horizontal number line, called the x-axis, and a vertical number line, called the y-axis, intersecting at a point called the origin. Each point in the coordinate plane can be specified by an ordered pair of numbers. The lines that cross each other to form a series of squares is called a grid. Using the example of the US map on the "Attach on Sullivan's Island Worksheet", have students draw a coordinate plane over a provided map of the Charleston Harbor area as it was in 1776. Collect all worksheets.

Session 2

Step 1. Ask the students to examine the coin image again. Review the activities and discussions from the previous session. Distribute the "Attack on Sullivan's Island" worksheet to students. Allow students to study the geography of Charleston Harbor and the islands depicted in the map beneath the grid pattern. Using websites from preparations, identify the locations of each ship identified in the "Battle Coordinates" worksheet. Organize students into pairs and distribute the "Battle Coordinates" worksheet. Demonstrate how to graph the first set of order pairs on the coordinate plane. Using the "Battle Coordinates Worksheet" and websites that depict Charleston Harbor as it appeared in 1776, allow time for students to graph and/or label the remaining ordered pairs. At the end of this session, take up students' worksheets to check for student understanding.

Step 2. Introduce the students to the selected text about South Carolina's history in 1776 or Sullivan's Island. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occurring at different points in the text. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary. After reading, lead a class discussion to determine if students' responses correctly predicted what happened in the Battle of Sullivan's Island. Lead a class discussion about the reasons the Americans won the battle.  Explain to students that the Battle of Sullivan's Island was the first battle in the Revolutionary War in which the Patriots successfully blocked a British sea and land invasion. Ask students to explain how the timing of this victory may have impacted the work being completed on the Declaration of Independence.

Step 3. Ask the students to examine the coin image again. Lead a class discussion about Sergeant William Jasper's actions during the battle as depicted on the coin. Review the chart of student responses from Session 1. Provide plain paper to the students what they think Sergeant William Jasper was feeling. Have students record their responses on their sheet of paper. Divide the class into groups based on their written responses. Allow time for groups to discuss their reasons for their choices. Allow time for groups to share and defend their choices with the whole class.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to dictate written responses on the worksheets.
  • Allow students to complete worksheets with a partner.
  • Provide students with reduced options during the graphing portion of the lesson

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students research the flag design depicted on the coin and how that influenced South Carolina's present state flag.
  • Have students research the science of force and impact as it relates to the Battle of Sullivan's Island.
  • Have students learn about other naval battles in American History by visiting the 2013 Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial quarter lesson plan for grades 4-6.

Assess

  • Take anecdotal notes about the students' participation in class discussions.
  • Use the students' worksheets and anecdotal notes to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.5 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
Standards:

  • RI.5.7. Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • RI.5.8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
  • RI.5.9. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

Discipline: Math
Domain: 5.G Geometry
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems
Standards:

  • 5.G.1. Use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to define a coordinate system, with the intersection of the lines (the origin) arranged to coincide with the 0 on each line and a given point in the plane located by using an ordered pair of numbers, called its coordinates.
    • Understand that the first number indicates how far to travel from the origin in the direction of one axis, and the second number indicates how far to travel in the direction of the second axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond (e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).
  • 5.G.2. Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation. 

Discipline: Math
Domain: 6.G Geometry
Grade(s): Grade 5
Cluster: Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume
Standards:

  • 6.G.1. Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals and polygons by composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes; apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
  • 6.G.2. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with fractional edge lengths by packing it with unit cubes of the appropriate unit fraction edge lengths, and show that the volume is the same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths of the prism. Apply the formulas V = l x w x h and V = b x h to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with fractional edge lengths in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
  • 6.G.3. Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to find the length of a side joining points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
  • 6.G.4. Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.

National Standards

This lesson plan is not associated with any National Standards.