Welcome to the Neighborhood

Summary

Comparing past and present and showing hospitality.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will describe how Native Americans helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Students will compare the past and present. Students will explain the importance of showing hospitality to others.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts

Grades

  • 2nd
  • 3rd

Class Time

  • Sessions: Four
  • Session Length: 30-45 minutes
  • Total Length: 121-150 minutes

    Groupings

    • Whole group
    • Pairs
    • Individual work

    Background Knowledge

    Students should have a basic knowledge of:

    • Past and present
    • American Indian
    • Fiction and nonfiction texts
    • Role playing

    Terms and Concepts

    • Native American $1 Coin
    • Reverse (back)
    • Obverse (front)
    • Meriwether Lewis
    • William Clark
    • Explorer
    • Expedition
    • Hospitality
    • Journal

    Materials

    • 1 overhead projector or equivalent classroom technology (optional)
    • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" page
    • Copies of the following:
      • "Hospitality on the Trail" worksheet
      • "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet
      • "Hospitality on the Page" worksheet
      • "Let's Act It out" worksheet
      • "My Journal Checklist" worksheet
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture, such as:
      • Meet Lydia: A Native Girl from Southeast Alaska by Miranda Belarde-Lewis
      • Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes: Nine Indian Writers on the Legacy of the Expedition by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.
      • When the Rain Sings: Poems by Young Native Americans by the National Museum of the American Indian
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives basic information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition, such as:
      • The Great Expedition of Lewis and Clark: By Private Reubin Field, Member of the Corps of Discovery by Judith Edwards
      • You Wouldn't Want to Explore with Lewis and Clark! by Jacqueline Morley
      • How We Crossed the West: The Adventures of Lewis and Clark by Rosalyn Schanzer
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate fiction text about a new student at school, such as:
      • The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi
      • Chamelia and the New Kid in Class by Ethan Long
      • The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig
      • The New Bear at School by Carrie Weston
    • Chart paper
    • Markers, pencils, and crayons
    • Construction paper (12 x 18 inches)

    Preparations

    • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" page.
    • Make copies of the following:
      • "Hospitality on the Trail" worksheet (1 half page per student)
      • "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet (4 or more per student)
      • "Hospitality on the Page" worksheet (1 half page per student)
      • "Let's Act It Out" worksheet (1 page per 6 stations, cut into 6 scenario strips, 1 strip per station)
      • "My Journal Checklist" worksheet (1 half page per student)
    • Locate a text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture (see examples under "Materials").
    • Locate a text that gives basic information about the Lewis and Clark Expedition (see examples under "Materials").
    • Locate a fiction text about a new student at school (see examples under "Materials").
    • Locate and bookmark Web sites that provide examples of journal entries from the Lewis and Clark Expedition, such as:
    • Create a teacher-made example of the "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet.
    • Prepare a chart for Think-Pair-Share work in Session 3 titled "Hospitality at School."
    • Invite a class visitor for Session 4 (for example, a guest speaker, parent, principal, or community member).

    Worksheets

    Worksheets and files (PDF)

    Lesson Steps

    Session 1

    1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
    2. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" overhead transparency or photocopy. Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the "reverse" and "obverse" is another name for the front.  Ask the students to examine the image and tell you what they see.
    3. Explain to the students that the theme of the coin is "hospitality." Discuss the term and develop a definition. Explain the coin image 2014 theme, "Native Hospitality Ensured the Success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition."
    4. Tell the students that over two hundred years ago, two men named Meriwether Lewis and William Clark led a group of explorers westward to the Pacific Ocean. Tell the students an explorer is someone who travels somewhere they have never been to learn about the land, people, animals, and plants that live there. An expedition is the explorers' journey to a new place.
    5. Note for the students that this expedition took place in the past from 1804 to 1806. Explain to the students that Native Americans were very helpful to the Lewis and Clark Expedition and that their hospitality (showing kindness and generosity toward guests) helped the expedition succeed. Write the words "hospitality," "explorer," and "expedition" on chart paper and record the definitions.
    6. Using a two-student sharing format, ask the students to discuss and share how the Native Americans might have helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
    7. Introduce the students to the selected text about the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Remind the students to think about examples of the hospitality of the Native Americans.
    8. Distribute the "Hospitality on the Trail" worksheet. Explain that students should write down examples from the text of the hospitality of the Native Americans. Read the text aloud, pausing for students to make notes in the first box on the worksheet.
    9. Ask the students to share what they learned about how Native Americans helped the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Add these ideas to the "Hospitality on the Trail" worksheet.
    10. Explain to the students (or refer to the text) that Lewis and Clark were known for keeping journals during their expedition. Display and discuss examples of these journals using the bookmarked Web sites.
    11. Explain to the students that they will be creating several journal entries over the next few sessions. All of their entries will be compiled into a journal in the style of Lewis and Clark. Display the teacher-created example.
    12. Distribute a large piece of construction paper to each student and have them fold it to create a folder as their journal. Have the students write "My Hospitality Journal" and their names on the cover. Allow time for them to decorate the folder.
    13. Distribute a copy of the "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet to each student. Explain that they will be keeping a journal to record their learning during their study of hospitality. Provide the students with the following prompt: "Hospitality was important to Lewis and Clark because…" Encourage them to include details and examples.
    14. After all the students have completed their journal entries, allow time for them to share with a partner or the whole group. Have the students add the journal entry to their folders. Explain to the students that they will be learning in the next session about how showing hospitality can make an impact in our modern lives.

    Session 2

    1. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" transparency. Review with the students the material covered in the previous session, including the definition of "hospitality" and the "Hospitality on the Trail" worksheet. Review the importance of the hospitality of the Native Americans to the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
    2. Explain to the students that they will be looking for examples of how hospitality affects people in the present, just as it did in the past with the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
    3. Introduce the students to the selected text about a new student at school. Ask the students to be thinking about examples of how the text's characters show hospitality or how they could show hospitality. Distribute the "Hospitality on the Page" worksheet for student note-taking in words or pictures.
    4. Ask students to share their notes. Add these ideas to a chart labeled "Hospitality on the Page" along with the title of the book.
    5. Distribute a "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet to each student. Explain to the students that they will be continuing to add to their journal to record their learning. Provide the students with the following prompt: "Hospitality was important to [insert character name] because…" Encourage the students to include details and examples.
    6. After all the students have completed their journal entries, allow time for them to share with a partner or the whole group.
    7. Have the students add the journal entry to their folders.

    Session 3

    1. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" transparency. Review with the students the material covered in the previous sessions, including the definition of "hospitality" and the examples of hospitality discovered so far.
    2. Explain to the students that they will be practicing hospitality themselves by acting out different scenarios with a partner in a role-playing activity. These scenarios focus on how students can show hospitality in school.
    3. Choose one of the scenarios to model with a student. Demonstrate how the partners read the scenario together, assign roles, and then act out the scenario. In each scenario, one role will be expected to be demonstrating hospitality to the other person. Model the scenario as appropriate to the teaching context, or use this sample script for the scenario of an adult classroom visitor:
      • Visitor: (knocks on door) Hello. I'm Mr. ______.
      • Student: Hello, Mr. _______. We've been expecting you. My name is _____. Welcome to our class!
      • Visitor: Thank you!
      • Student: Would you like to sit here? We are setting up a science experiment about weather.
    4. Set up stations around the classroom, having the students rotate through a set of six stations so that each student gets to play a role in each of the six scenarios. For larger classes, you could print two copies of the "Let's Act it Out" worksheet to make 12 stations (or more). To streamline the process, you could assign students to always play Role 1 or Role 2. You might also assign a time limit for each station. Distribute one "Let's Act It Out" scenario strip per station.
    5. Assign role-playing partners. Explain a system for the pairs (or small groups) of students to move around the room to each scenario station. Monitor and support student groups as they act out the different scenarios.
    6. After the students have acted out each scenario, gather them into one group. Provide time for reflection. Then ask these questions to guide reflection:
      • How did you feel acting out the different scenarios?
      • How did you feel when you were the person showing hospitality?
      • How did you feel when you were the person receiving hospitality?
      • How might someone feel in these situations if people did not show hospitality?
      • What did you learn from this role playing activity?
    7. Display the "Hospitality at School" chart. Using a Think-Pair-Share format, ask the students to discuss and share how they can show hospitality at school. Keep this chart posted in the classroom throughout the year as a reference tool for welcoming class visitors and new students.
    8. Distribute a "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet to each student. Provide the students with the following prompt: "Hospitality is important at school because…." Have the students add another entry to their journal to record what they've learned. Encourage the students to include details and examples.
    9. After all the students have completed their journal entries, allow time for them to share with a partner or the whole group.
    10. Have the students add the journal entry to their folders.
    11. As an extended home assignment over the next week or weekend, ask the students to look for examples of hospitality or opportunities where they can show hospitality in their homes or communities.

    Session 4

    1. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" transparency. Review with the students the material covered in the previous sessions, focusing on the definition and examples of "hospitality."
    2. Tell the students that they will be having a special visitor and the students will be expected to display their hospitality skills. Bring the visitor into the class and give the students opportunities to use hospitality during the visit or presentation.
    3. Ask the students to share the hospitality they showed in their home or community during the previous week or weekend. Depending on the size of the group, this sharing can take place in pairs or small groups.
    4. Distribute a "My Hospitality Journal" worksheet to each student. Provide the students with the following prompts: "Hospitality in my community is important because…" and "Hospitality in the past and present are similar because…." Have the students add what they've learned to their journal using specific details and examples. After all the students have completed their journal entries, allow time for them to share with a partner or the whole group.
    5. Have the students add the journal entry to their folders.
    6. Distribute the "My Journal Checklist" worksheet and allow students time to review and revise their journals as needed based on the checklist.

    Differentiated Learning Options

    • Allow students to use a scribe, computer program, or drawings to complete their worksheets.
    • Provide adult support or scripts for acting out the scenarios.
    • Allow students to work in pairs to create their journal entries.

    Enrichments/Extensions

    • Have students search for examples of hospitality in other books or real life situations and add them to the hospitality journals.
    • Have students learn more about Native Americans through other Native American $1 Coin lesson plans for grades 2 and 3.
    • Have students learn more about the Lewis and Clark Expedition through the Westward Journal Nickel Series lesson plans for grades 2 and 3.
    • Have the students learn more about the Lewis and Clark Expedition by locating related primary source documents (such as journals).

    Assess

    Take anecdotal notes about the students' participation in class discussions.

    Evaluate the students' worksheets, journal entries, and writing checklist for understanding of the lesson objectives.

    Common Core Standards

    This lesson plan is not associated with any Common Core Standards.

    National Standards

    Discipline: Social Studies
    Domain: All Thematic Standards
    Cluster: Culture and Cultural Diversity
    Grade(s): Grades K–12
    Standards:

    Teachers should:

    • assist learners to understand and apply the concept of culture as an integrated whole that governs the functions and interactions of language, literature, arts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behavior patterns
    • enable learners to analyze and explain how groups, societies, and cultures address human needs and concerns
    • guide learners as they predict how experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference
    • encourage learners to compare and analyze societal patterns for transmitting and preserving culture while adapting to environmental and social change
    • enable learners to assess the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and across groups
    • have learners interpret patterns of behavior as reflecting values and attitudes which contribute to or pose obstacles to cross-cultural understanding
    • guide learners in constructing reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent human issues
    • have learners explain and apply ideas, theories, and modes of inquiry drawn from anthropology and sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems

    Discipline: Social Studies
    Domain: All Thematic Standards
    Cluster: Civic Ideals and Practices
    Grade(s): Grades K–12
    Standards:

    Teachers should:

    • assist learners in understanding the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice, equality, and the rule of law
    • guide learner efforts to identify, analyze, interpret, and evaluate sources and examples of citizens’ rights and responsibilities
    • facilitate learner efforts to locate, access, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about selected public issues—identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view and taking reasoned positions on such issues
    • provide opportunities for learners to practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of citizens in a democratic republic
    • help learners to analyze and evaluate the influence of various forms of citizen action on public policy
    • prepare learners to analyze a variety of public policies and issues from the perspective of formal and informal political actors
    • guide learners as they evaluate the effectiveness of public opinion in influencing and shaping public policy development and decision-making
    • encourage learner efforts to evaluate the degree to which public policies and citizen behaviors reflect or foster the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
    • support learner efforts to construct policy statements and action plans to achieve goals related to issues of public concern
    • create opportunities for learner participation in activities to strengthen the “common good,” based upon careful evaluation of possible options for citizen action

    Discipline: Social Studies
    Domain: All Disciplinary Standards
    Cluster: Civics and Government
    Grade(s): Grades K–12
    Standards:

    Teachers should:

    • assist learners in developing an understanding of civic life, politics, and government, so that the learners can explore the origins of governmental authority, recognize the need for government; identify the crucial functions of government, including laws and rules; evaluate rules and laws; differentiate between limited and unlimited government; and appreciate the importance of limitations on government power
    • guide learners as they explore American democracy, including the American idea of constitutional government, the impact of the distinctive characteristics of American society on our government, the nature of the American political culture, and the values and principles that are basic to American life and government
    • help learners understand how the government of the United States operates under the constitution and the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy, including the ideas of distributed, shared, and limited powers of government; how the national, state, and local governments are organized; and the place of law in the system
    • enable learners to understand the relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs
    • assist learners in developing an understanding of citizenship, its rights and responsibilities, and in developing their abilities and dispositions to participate effectively in civic life
    • insure that learners are made aware of the full range of opportunities to participate as citizens in the American democracy and of their responsibilities for doing so