Helping Hands

Summary

Exploring hospitality, helpfulness, and healthful foods

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will define hospitality and identify ways to help others. Students will identify healthy foods.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts
  • Science

Grades

  • K
  • 1st

Class Time

  • Sessions: Four
  • Session Length: 20-30 minutes
  • Total Length: 46-90 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of:

  • Native Americans
  • Helping guests and visitors
  • Foods

Terms and Concepts

  • Native American $1 Coin
  • Obverse (front)
  • Reverse (back)
  • Lewis and Clark
  • Corps of Discovery
  • Explorer
  • Expedition
  • Hospitality
  • Gourd
  • Healthful foods
  • Sometimes foods
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrients
  • Vitamins and minerals

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector or equivalent classroom technology (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" worksheet
    • "Lewis and Clark Expedition Map" worksheet
    • "I Can Help Others" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" checklist
  • Copies of the following:
    • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" worksheet
    • "I Can Help Others" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" checklist
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture, such as:
    • Meet Lydia: A Native Girl from Southeast Alaska by Miranda Belarde-Lewis
    • Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes: Nine Indian Writers on the Legacy of the Expedition by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.
    • When the Rain Sings: Poems by Young Native Americans by the National Museum of the American Indian
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives information about hospitality or helping others, such as:
    • Berenstain Bears Lend a Helping Hand by Stan Berenstain
    • Llama Llama Time to Share by Anna Dewdney
    • Bear Says Thanks by Karma Wilson
    • Two Fine Ladies: Tea for Three (Step-Into-Reading, Step 1) by Antonia Zehler
  • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives information about healthful eating, such as:
    • Gobey Gets Full by Judy Caplan
    • Eating Well (Looking After Me) by Liz Gogerly
    • Why Should I Eat Well? (Why Should I? Books) by Claire Llewellyn
    • Tricky Treats by Georgia Perez
    • Eat Healthy, Feel Great by William Sears, M.D., Martha Sears, R.N., and Christine Watts Kelly
  • Chart paper
  • Markers
  • Pencils
  • Crayons
  • Glue
  • Three-ring binder
  • 3x5-inch sticky notes
  • Assorted toy foods
  • Scissors
  • 12x18-inch construction paper
  • Grocery store circulars or advertisements

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:
    • "2014 Native American $1 Coin" worksheet
    • "Lewis and Clark Expedition Map" worksheet
    • "I Can Help Others" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" worksheet
    • "A Healthful Basket" checklist
  • Make copies of each of the following:
    • "I Can Help Others" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "A Healthful Basket" worksheet (1 half sheet per student)
    • "A Healthful Basket" checklist (1 per student)
  • Locate a text or excerpt that gives information about Native American culture (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate a text that gives information about hospitality or helping others (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate a text that gives information about healthful eating (see examples under "Materials").
  • Create a chart labeled "Always Foods/Sometimes Foods" for Session 3.
  • Collect a variety of toy foods for Session 3.
  • Collect assorted grocery store circulars for the "A Healthful Basket" worksheet.

Worksheets

Worksheets and files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

Sessions 1 and 2

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information. The program is described at www.usmint.gov/kids/coinNews/nativeAmerican/.
  2. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" overhead transparency or photocopy. Tell the students that the front of the coin is called the "obverse" and the back is called the "reverse." Examine the coin design with the students and locate the 2014 theme, "Native Hospitality Ensured the Success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition."
  3. Tell the students that over two hundred years ago, two men named Merriweather Lewis and William Clark led a group of explorers westward to the Pacific Ocean. Explain that, along the way, the group met many Native American tribes. These tribes helped the group on their journey by offering friendship, supplies, and directions. Display the "Lewis and Clark Expedition Map" and show the students the route.
  4. Tell the students that Native American tribes prospered many years before the arrival of Lewis and Clark. Explain that Native Americans, including the Mandan tribe, had formed far-reaching trade routes and had a long history of welcoming people from many cultures.
  5. Explain that the food the tribes provided helped the travelers finish their journey successfully. The Mandan were agriculturists and knew a lot about how to grow food.
  6. Tell the students an explorer is someone who travels somewhere they have never been to learn about the land, people, animals, and plants that live there. An expedition is the explorers' journey to a new place. Write the words "Lewis and Clark," "explorer," and "expedition" on chart paper and record the definitions.
  7. Ask the students if they have ever been on a long trip before. Have the students brainstorm with a partner what things they might bring on a long trip.
  8. Record the student responses on chart paper. Ask the students where they might stay if they were traveling to a place where they did not know anyone. Discuss with the students where they would get food to eat and what they would do if they forgot to pack something. Lead the students to conclude that they could go to a store to buy what they needed.
  9. Explain to the students that the Lewis and Clark expedition lasted for about two years. Ask the students if it would be possible to pack and carry everything you would need to survive for two years. Explain to the students that there were no stores where the expedition traveled two hundred years ago. Tell the students that although the expedition hunted for plants and animals to eat, during the winter months the supplies could run out.
  10. Write the word "hospitality" on the chart paper and ask the students what they think the word means. Accept all reasonable answers. Discuss the term and develop a definition. Record the definition on chart paper.
  11. Examine the coin image and direct the student's attention to the Native American woman. Discuss with the students the foods she is holding. Identify the foods as fish, corn, root vegetables and gourds. Explain to the students that the Native Americans showed hospitality to the Lewis and Clark Expedition in many ways. Tell the students that throughout the two-year journey, many different Native American tribes showed hospitality to the explorers. For example, the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes welcomed the explorers to stay with them during the first winter of the expedition. Without the hospitality and help of the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes, the expedition would not have survived.
  12. Introduce the students to the selected text about hospitality. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occurring at different points in the text. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  13. Have the students discuss with a partner one way they can show hospitality to people in their neighborhood. Record the student answers on chart paper.
  14. Tell the students that they are going to create a class book of different ways they can show hospitality to others.
  15. Display a copy of the "I Can Help" worksheet. Tell the students they will draw a picture and write about one way they can show hospitality to others.
  16. Distribute the "I Can Help" worksheet to the students. Allow time for the students to complete the project.
  17. Place each completed worksheet into the three-ring binder after the students have shared their worksheet with the class. Display the completed book in the classroom.

Sessions 3 and 4

  1. Review the information and charts from the previous session. Display the "2014 Native American $1 Coin" transparency, focusing attention on the food offered by the Native American woman.
  2. Ask the students why food would be a valuable gift for the expedition. Lead a class discussion about why we need food to survive. Record the student responses on chart paper.
  3. Explain that Native Americans view food as more than a source of fuel but also as medicine that leads to good health.
  4. Tell the students that today they will learn about good nutrition. Nutrition is about the things in food that keep us healthy and how our bodies use them. Write "Nutrition" on the chart paper and record the definition.
  5. Give each student one sticky note and tell the students to draw and label a picture of a food they like to eat. Collect the sticky notes to be used later in the lesson.
  6. Tell the students that foods that are good for your body are called "healthful" or "always" foods. Always foods help you to grow, think, and move. They are full of nutrients like vitamins and minerals, fats and proteins, which help our bodies move and work and heal when they're sick or hurt. "Sometimes" foods are foods that are not good for us. Write "Always foods," "Nutrients," and "Sometimes foods" on chart paper and record the definitions.
  7. Introduce the students to the selected text about healthful eating. As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occurring at different points in the text. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
  8. Display the chart "Always Foods" and "Sometimes Foods" and the toy food. Have the students determine whether the toy foods should be labeled as always or sometimes foods. Using the sticky notes, have the students sort the food pictures into the food categories. Review the completed chart with the students.
  9. Return to the coin image and ask the students if they think the foods offered by the Native American woman are "always foods" or "sometimes foods." Review with the students what the word "hospitality" means. Ask the students to imagine that hungry explorers are visiting the school. Have them show hospitality to the explorers by working with a partner to create a basket of healthy foods as a gift.
  10. Display the "A Healthful Basket" worksheet and read the directions as a class. Display the "A Healthful Basket" checklist and review it with the students. Distribute the worksheet, construction paper, and grocery store circulars. Allow time for the students to complete the project and the checklist with their partner.
  11. Display the completed projects in the classroom.

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Have students use pre-cut pictures.
  • Have students work with a partner to complete the "I Can Help" worksheet.
  • Have students dictate the written portion of the worksheet.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Explore the many foods cultivated by Native Americans (corn, squash, tomatoes, pumpkins, garlic, potatoes, sweet potatoes, peanuts, onions, maple syrup, beans, etc.) and have students identify how these foods contribute to good health.
  • Using online resources like www.pbs.org/lewisandclark/native/, have students identify other tribes that Lewis and Clark encountered from 1804 to 1806.
  • Create a smartboard activity that allows students to drag healthful/unhealthful foods onto the "A Healthful Basket" labels.
  • Visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Web site to view the story "Tricky Treats" at www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/TrickyTreats/.
  • Have students host an in-school read-aloud and invite residents of a senior center to hear their stories.
  • Have students learn about how exercise helps keep your body healthy by visiting the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Web site at www.cdc.gov/diabetes/projects/ndwp/ebtoolkit/index.html.
  • Have students learn more about the Lewis and Clark Expedition with the 2004 Westward Journey Nickel Series lesson plan for grades K and 1 called "Making Friends."
  • Have students learn more about how Native Americans grew food with the 2009 Native American $1 Coin lesson plan for grades K and 1 called "How Does a Garden Grow?"

Assess

Use the students' class participation, worksheets, and checklist to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.K.3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
Standards:

  • RI.1.1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.1.2. Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • RI.1.3. Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: RL.1 Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): Grade K
Cluster: Craft and Structure
Standards:

  • RI.1.4. Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
  • RI.1.5. Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • RI.1.6. Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.

National Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Use of Spoken, Written, and Visual Language
Grade(s): Grades K–12
Standards:

  • Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).