I Am Steel

Summary

Students will analyze the movement of Americans and the Mohawk ironworkers from rural to urban areas for job opportunities. Students will write a script and present a monologue from the perspective of the Kahnawake Mohawk and Mohawk Akwesasne ironworker on the construction site.

Coin Type(s)

  • Dollar

Coin Program(s)

  • Native American $1 Coins

Objectives

Students will analyze the movement of Americans and the Mohawk ironworkers from rural to urban areas for job opportunities.

Students will write a script and present a monologue from the perspective of the Kahnawake Mohawk and Mohawk Akwesasne ironworker on the construction site.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies
  • Language Arts
  • Technology
  • Drama

Grades

  • 7th
  • 8th

Class Time

  • Sessions: Four
  • Session Length: 45-60 minutes
  • Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Individual work

Background Knowledge

Students should have a basic knowledge of

  • Industry
  • Perspectives
  • Urban
  • Rural Areas
  • Writing Process
  • Visual Representations such as diagrams, cause and effect, graphic organizer, or illustration
     

Terms and Concepts

  • Native American $1 Coin
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)
  • Mohawk
  • Ironworkers
  • Monologue
  • Revolution
  • Industrial Revolution
     

Materials

  • 1 overhead projector or other classroom technology (optional)
  • 1 overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "2015 Native American $1 Coin Reverse" page
  • Copies of the following worksheets:
    • "I Am Urban!" worksheet
    • "I Am Urban Exit Slip"
    • "I Am an Ironworker!" worksheet
    • "I Am Steel!!! Monologue Rubric"
  • Copies (or technology equivalent) of the 2015 Native American $1 Coin information page.
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain information on the movement of people from rural to urban environments
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain information on the Mohawk Ironworkers
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain monologues
  • Chart paper/bulletin board paper
  • Poster paper
  • Markers

Preparations

  • Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of the "2015 Native American $1 Coin Reverse" page.
  • Make copies of the following:
    • "I Am Urban!" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "I Am Urban Exit Slip" (1 per student)
    • "I Am an Ironworker!" worksheet (1 per student)
    • "I Am Steel!!! Monologue Rubric" (1 per student)
  • Make copies (or technology equivalent) of the 2015 Native American $1 Coin information page or the 2015 Native American Coin kids page.
  • Reserve computer lab for Sessions 1, 2, 3, and 4.
  • Prepare chart paper/bulletin board paper with the following (1 per chart).
    • Timeline
    • Cause and Effect
  • Locate and bookmark online resources for student research on the movement of people from rural areas to urban areas.
  • Locate and bookmark online resources for student research on the Mohawk Ironworkers.
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain information on the movement of people from rural to urban areas (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain information on the Mohawk Ironworkers (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate age appropriate texts that contain monologues (see examples under "Materials").
  • Locate images of the Empire State Building and other tall buildings in New York City.
  • Check the "I Am Urban Exit Slip" for accuracy after Session 1.

Worksheets

Worksheets and files (PDF)

Lesson Steps

Session 1 and 2

  1. Describe the Native American $1 Coin Program for background information.
  2. Display "2015 Native American $1 Coin Reverse" overhead transparency or photocopy. Examine the coin design with the students and identify the 2015 theme of "Mohawk Ironworkers."
  3. Tell the students that the front of a coin is called the "obverse" and the back is called the "reverse." Ask the students to share their ideas about the image on the quarter's reverse.  Record student responses on chart paper.
  4. Read aloud the first paragraph of the information page to introduce the Mohawk Ironworkers to the students. Ask the students if they have been to the top of a tall building, a high precipice, or tall bridge. Ask them how it felt. Record student responses on chart paper.
  5. Display images of the Empire State building. Display images of the workers constructing the building or similar buildings in New York City. Discuss the construction of the Empire State Building.
  6. Discuss the height of the Empire State Building. Tell the students the height of the Empire State Building is 1250 feet.
  7. Take the students outside. If possible have the students walk 1250 feet away from the school building to get an accurate visualization of how tall the Empire State building is.
  8. Have the students return to the classroom. Record responses and reactions from students on chart paper.
  9. Ask the students for reasons why people would move from one place to another. Record student responses on chart paper. Explain to the students that there have periods of time throughout history when people moved from one place to another.
  10. Ask the students to define the word revolution. Record student responses on chart paper. Lead the students to conclude that a revolution is a sudden, complete or marked change in something. Ask the students to define an industrial revolution. Record student responses on chart paper. Lead the students to conclude that an industrial revolution is the transformation of countries into industrial nations. It is a time when countries and people move from farms and rural societies to industrial and urban societies.
  11. Explain to the students that they will be researching the movement of people from rural to urban societies during the Industrial Revolution in America. Distribute the "I Am Urban" worksheet to the students.
  12. Explain to the students that they will be working in groups of 2-3. Each group will research the answers to the questions on the worksheet. Review the directions with the students.
  13. Have the students work in small groups to research and create a visual representation  of the movement of people. Allow students time to research and create their visual representation.
  14. Have the students present their visual representation.
  15. Summarize main points and connections on the chart papers and the visual representations.
  16. Distribute the "I am Urban Exit Slip." Have the students complete the Exit Slip. Collect the sheet and check for accuracy.
  17. Identify some students in the classroom who would be willing to read a monologue for the class. Give them copies of some monologues from the resources under materials. Ask them to practice and present for the next session.

Session 3 and 4

  1. Review the charts, exit slip and visual representations from the previous session. Review the motives for the movement of people to urban areas and the construction of tall buildings in large cities such as New York City.
  2. Review the coin reverse.
  3. Explain to the students that the Mohawk ironworkers worked at incredible heights. Explain to the students that they will be researching and answering some questions about this amazing group of people.
  4. Distribute the "I Am an Ironworker!" worksheet. Allow students time to research and complete the worksheet.
  5. Review the worksheets and check for accuracy.
  6. Ask the students to define the word monologue. Record student responses on chart paper. Lead the students to conclude that a monologue is a part of a drama in which a single actor speaks alone.
  7. Introduce some monologues to the students. Have the selected students from the previous session read their monologues.
  8. Distribute the "I Am Steel!!! Monologue Rubric" to the students. Review the rubric with the students. Explain to the students that they will be writing and presenting a monologue from the perspective of the Mohawk Ironworkers they researched. They are to use the research they did on the Industrial Revolution and the Mohawks. They are to try to verbalize what it would be like to work 1250 feet above the ground.
  9. Review the writing process.
  10. Allow students time to write their monologues using the writing process.
  11. Have the students read their monologues to the class. Have the students complete the "I Am Steel!!! Monologue Rubric".

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to work in pairs.
  • Have the students use video/audio resources for information to complete the worksheets.
  • Prepare a basic script that students can fill in the details.
  • Have students who are reluctant to read in front of the class record their monologues on video or audio platforms. Then present the video to the class.
     

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have the students complete the Homestead Narratives 7-8 lesson plan and connect the Homestead Act with the movement of people.
  • Students may need additional guidance.
  • Record monologues and play for students as part of a self-evaluation.
  • Have the students present monologues to other classes or guests.

Assess

  • Use the "I Am Steel!!! Monologue Rubric" and the "I Am an Ironworker!" worksheet to assess student understanding of the ironworker's perspective.
  • Use the "I Am Urban Exit Slip" to assess student understanding of the impact of steel production and the movement from rural areas to urban areas during the Industrial Revolution.
     

Common Core Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.7 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.7.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.7.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 7.)
  • W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: W.8 Writing
Grade(s): Grade 7
Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
Standards:

  • W.8.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
  • W.8.5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grade 8.)
  • W.8.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

National Standards

Discipline: Visual Arts and Music
Domain: 5-8 Theater
Cluster: Standard 2: Acting by developing basic acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students analyze descriptions, dialogue, and actions to discover, articulate, and justify character motivation and invent character behaviors based on the observation of interactions, ethical choices, and emotional responses of people
  • Students demonstrate acting skills (such as sensory recall, concentration, breath control, diction, body alignment, control of isolated body parts) to develop characterizations that suggest artistic choices
  • Students in an ensemble, interact as the invented characters

Discipline: Social Studies
Domain: All Thematic Standards
Cluster: Production, Distribution, and Consumption
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

Teachers should:

  • enable learners to explain how the scarcity of productive resources (human, capital, technological, and natural) requires the development of economic systems to make decisions about how goods and services are to be produced and distributed
  • help learners analyze the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system
  • help learners compare the costs and benefits to society of allocating goods and services through private and public means
  • assist learners in understanding the relationships among the various economic institutions that comprise economic systems such as households, businesses, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations
  • guide learner analysis of the role of specialization and exchange in economic processes
  • provide opportunities for learners to assess how values and beliefs influence private and public economic decisions in different societies
  • have learners compare basic economic systems according to how they deal with demand, supply, prices, the role of government, banks, labor and labor unions, savings and investments, and capital
  • challenge learners to apply economic concepts and reasoning when evaluating historical and contemporary social developments and issues
  • enable learners to distinguish between domestic and global economic systems, and explain how the two interact
  • guide learners in the application of economic concepts and principles in the analysis of public issues such as the allocation of health care or the consumption of energy, and in devising economic plans for accomplishing socially desirable outcomes related to such issues
  • help learners critically examine the values and assumptions underlying the theories and models of economics
  • help learners to distinguish between economics as a field of inquiry and the economy

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: All Language Arts Standards
Cluster: Using Technological Information
Grade(s): Grades 5–8
Standards:

  • Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.