It’s in the Details

Summary

Students will classify objects. Students will define what an adjective is and describe objects using descriptive words.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter
  • Medal

Coin Program(s)

  • America the Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

Students will classify objects.  Students will define what an adjective is and describe objects using descriptive words.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Language Arts
  • Science

Grades

  • K
  • 1st

Class Time

  • Sessions: Four
  • Session Length: 20-30 minutes
  • Total Length: 91-120 minutes

    Groupings

    • Whole group
    • Small groups
    • Pairs
    • Individual work

    Background Knowledge

    Students should have a basic knowledge of:

    • Sorting objects
    • Generating writing ideas
    • 5 Senses

    Terms and Concepts

    • Quarter
    • Obverse (front)
    • Reverse (back)
    • Shawnee National Forest
    • Scientist
    • Classify
    • Adjective

    Materials

    • 1 overhead projector or other classroom technology (optional)
    • 1 overhead transparency (or equivalent) of each of the following:
      • “Shawnee National Forest Quarter Reverse” page
      • “Classify This!” worksheet
      • “Classify This! Checklist”
      • “It’s in the Details” worksheet
      • “It’s in the Details Checklist”
    • Copies of the following:
      • “Shawnee National Forest Quarter Reverse” page
      • “Classify This!” worksheet
      • “Classify This! Checklist”
      • “America The Beautiful” quarter reverse pages
      • “It’s in the Details” worksheet
      • “It’s in the Details Checklist”
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives information about classifying objects.
    • 1 copy of an age-appropriate text that gives information about adjectives.
    • 1 class map of the United States
    • Chart paper
    • Markers
    • Pencils
    • Crayons
    • Assorted rocks
    • Eraser for chalk or white board
    • Assorted classroom objects, such as a pencil, backpack, and glue stick, etc.
    • Images of the following locations found at Shawnee National Forest of “Camel Rock” and “Old Stone Face”
    • Images from Shawnee National Forest of a red-tailed hawk
    • Locate assorted “America the Beautiful” quarter reverse pages (such as: Yosemite National Park, Glacier National Park, El Yunque National Forest, Denali National Park and Preserve, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, and Mount Rushmore National Memorial)
    • Scissors
    • Glue

    Preparations

    • Make an overhead transparency (or equivalent) of each of the following:
      • “Shawnee National Forest” quarter reverse
      • “Classify This!” worksheet
      • “Classify This! Checklist”
      • “It’s in the Details” worksheet
      • “It’s in the Details Checklist”
    • Make copies of each of the following:
      • “Shawnee National Forest” quarter reverse (1 per student)
      • “Classify This!” worksheet (1 per student)
      • “Classify This! Checklist” (1 per student)
      • “America the Beautiful” quarter reverse pages (1 per student) (see examples under “Materials”)
      • “It’s in the Details” worksheet (1 per student)
      • “It’s in the Details Checklist” (1 per student)
    • Locate a text that gives information about classifying objects (see examples under “Materials”).
    • Locate a text that gives information about adjectives (see examples under “Materials”).
    • Gather samples of rocks (1 per pair).
    • Create a chart labeled “Rocks” for Session 1.
    • Create a chart labeled “Eraser” for Session 1.
    • Gather a variety of objects found in the classroom for students to classify (pencil, book, eraser, backpack, paper weight, glue stick, etc.).
    • Locate images from Shawnee National Forest of the following locations:  “Camel Rock” and “Old Stone Face”.
    • Locate an image of a red-tailed hawk.
    • Locate an image of the “Chickasaw National Recreation Area Quarter Reverse”: /kids/campcoin/25c2010-10ok.pdf
    • Locate and print “America the Beautiful” quarter reverse pages for Session 3 and 4 at: http://www.usmint.gov/kids/coinNews/atb (see examples under “Materials”)

    Worksheets

    Worksheets and files (PDF)

    Lesson Steps

    Sessions 1 and 2

    1. Display and examine the Shawnee National Forest reverse quarter design.  Locate this site on a class map.  Note its position in relation to your school’s location.  As background information, explain to the students that the United States Mint began to issue the quarters in the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program in 2010.  By the time the program ends in 2021, there will be a total of 56 designs on the back of the coin.  Each design will focus on a different national site-one from each state, territory and the District of Columbia.
    2. Tell the students that the front of the coin is called the “obverse” and the back is called the “reverse”.  Ask the students to tell you what they see in the image on the quarter’s reverse.  Explain that the coin image depicts Camel Rock and a red-tailed hawk soaring overhead.
    3. Distribute samples of various rocks.  Have the students talk with a partner about ways to describe the rock to someone who has never seen a rock before.  Remind the students that we use our 5 senses to learn about the world around us.  Record answers on the chart paper labeled “Rocks”.
    4. Ask the students if they know what a scientist is.  Tell the students a scientist is someone who learns and explores about nature and the world around us.  Record the definition on chart paper.  Ask the students how a scientist would describe the rock.  Add appropriate responses to chart paper.
    5. Write the word “classify” on the chart paper and tell the students that scientists classify objects.  Tell the students “classify” means to sort or group objects together based on things about the object that are the same.  Explain to the students that a few of the ways we can classify objects are by an object’s color, size, or shape.  Record the definition on chart paper.
    6. Introduce the students to the selected text about classifying objects.  As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occurring at different points in the text.
    7. Display the chalkboard or whiteboard eraser and tell the students they will classify the eraser as the book is read aloud.
    8. Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.  Display the “Eraser” chart paper and add classification information as the book is read.  After reading, display the “Rock” chart and add additional classification information.
    9. Distribute the assorted classroom objects to groups of children.  Display the “Classify This!” worksheet and explain the directions to the groups.  Display the “Classify This! Checklist” and review with the students.  Allow sufficient time for the students to complete the worksheet and checklist.
    10. Collect the worksheets and checklists.

    Sessions 3 and 4

    1. Review the information and charts from the previous session.  Display the Shawnee National Forest quarter reverse.  Focus the student’s attention on the large rock and ask the students if they remember the name of the rock.  Display an image of Camel Rock and point out the features on the rock that resemble a camel.  Return to the quarter reverse and while focusing attention to the bird, ask the students the name of the bird.  Display an image of a red-tailed hawk and discuss why the bird was given this name.
    2. Tell the students to imagine a stone named “Old Stone Face”.  Have the students share with a partner what they imagined “Old Stone Face” would look like.  Display an image of Old Stone Face at Shawnee National Forest and have the students describe what they see.  Have the students share how the image of Old Stone Face differs from what they imagined.  Discuss with the students how knowing the name of the stone changed the picture they imagined.
    3. Write the word, “adjective” on the chart paper and tell the students an adjective describes an object by giving details about the object, such as its color, size, shape, etc. Just as a scientist classifies objects to provide more details, adjectives help provide more details about objects in writing.
    4. Introduce the students to the selected text about adjectives.  As a group, preview the text and illustrations to generate observations about what is occurring at different points in the text.  Read the selected text to the class and attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.
    5. Tell the students they will now examine other America the Beautiful quarter reverses from previous years.  Explain to the students they will work with a partner to use adjectives to describe the image found on the quarter reverse.
    6. As an example, display the “Chickasaw National Recreation Area” quarter reverse and examine the image with the students.  Have the students talk with a partner to think of a sentence about one of the objects from the image.  Remind the students to include an adjective in their sentence.  Have the pairs share their describing sentence with the class.
    7. Distribute two identical copies of an America the Beautiful quarter reverse coin image to each pair.  Display the “It’s in the Details” worksheet and “It’s in the Details Checklist”.  Explain the worksheet to the students and allow time for the students to discuss the coin image and complete the worksheet.  Have the students complete the checklist when they are finished.
    8. Allow the students to share the completed worksheet with the class.

    Differentiated Learning Options

    • Have students use pre-cut pictures.
    • Allow students to work with a partner or scribe.
    • Have students dictate the written portion of the worksheet.
    • Allow extended time for completing the work.

    Enrichments/Extensions

    • Have students create their own unique “rock” using classroom materials.  Then have students write a sentence about the rock, using adjectives.
    • Have students create a bulletin board display titled “Can You Find My Bird?”  Have students draw a picture of their bird and then on a separate sheet of paper write a descriptive sentence about the bird.  Display the picture and writing separately.
    • Have students learn more about including details in their writing with the 2015 Kisatchie National Forest lesson plan for grades K and 1, “Through the Tunnel We Go!”
    • Have students learn more about classification with the 2012 Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Quarter lesson plan for grades K and 1, “Forms Matter!”

    Assess

    Use the students’ class participation, worksheets, and checklists to evaluate whether they have met the lesson objectives.

    Common Core Standards

    Discipline: Language Arts
    Domain: RL.K Reading: Informational Text
    Grade(s): Grade K
    Cluster: Key Ideas and Details
    Standards:

    • RI.K.1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
    • RI.K.2. With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
    • RI.K.3. With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

    Discipline: Language Arts
    Domain: W.1 Writing
    Grade(s): Grade K
    Cluster: Production and Distribution of Writing
    Standards:

    • W.1.4. begins in grade 3.
    • W.1.5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
    • W.1.6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

    National Standards

    Discipline: Language Arts
    Domain: All Language Arts Standards
    Cluster: Applying Strategies to Writing
    Grade(s): Grades K–12
    Standards:

    • Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

    Discipline: Science
    Domain: K-4 Content Standards
    Cluster: Earth and Space Science
    Grade(s): Grades K–12
    Standards:

    • Properties of Earth materials
    • Objects in the sky
    • Changes in earth and sky