Land, Sea, and History

Summary

Starting with the Cumberland Island National Seashore Quarter, students will learn about Cumberland Island and how it has changed over time.

Coin Type(s)

  • Quarter

Coin Program(s)

  • America the Beautiful Quarters

Objectives

Students will learn about the history and wildlife of Cumberland Island National Seashore and create a product demonstrating their knowledge.

Major Subject Area Connections

  • Social Studies

Minor/supporting Subject Area Connections

  • Art

Grades

  • 4th
  • 5th
  • 6th

Class Time

  • Sessions: Three
  • Session Length: 45-60 minutes
  • Total Length: 151-500 minutes

Groupings

  • Whole group
  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual work

Terms and Concepts

  • Quarter
  • Reverse (back)
  • Obverse (front)
  • History
  • Postcard
  • Wildlife

Materials

Preparations

  • Make copies of the following worksheets:
    • Cumberland Island Postcard (one per student, one per teacher)
    • Land, Sea, and History Rubric (one per student)
  • Bookmark relevant websites, such as those listed above
  • Gather supplemental resources about Cumberland Island's history and wildlife
  • Gather writing and drawing materials
  • Reserve computer lab (if necessary)

Worksheets

Lesson Steps

  1. Describe the America the Beautiful Quarters® Program for background information. Explain to students that the back of a coin is called the "reverse," and "obverse" is another name for the front.
  2. With the students, examine the Cumberland Island National Seashore Quarter reverse. Locate the site on a class map and note its position in relation to your school's location.
  3. In either small groups or pairs, create a circle map of adjectives that come to mind when looking at the quarter design.
  4. Have the students read and examine the resources about Cumberland Island. Using any grouping (whole class, small group, pairs, or individual), have the students answer the following questions:
    1. Who were the first settlers on Cumberland Island?
    2. How long has Cumberland Island been a National Seashore?
    3. How has the population of Cumberland Island changed over time?
    4. How has the wildlife of Cumberland Island changed over time?
    5. What are some of the reasons people visit Cumberland Island today?
  5. Have the students create projects that explore how the island's population and/or wildlife has changed over time. Have all the students complete the "Cumberland Island Postcard" worksheet and, in addition, have small groups choose a product listed on the "Land, Sea, and History Rubric."

Differentiated Learning Options

  • Allow students to use a scribe to complete their worksheets.
  • Allow students to use clip art or other available illustrations for the postcard.

Enrichments/Extensions

  • Have students learn about another National Park or National Seashore.
  • Center the presentations around a specific historical era on Cumberland Island.
  • Center the presentations around a specific animal on Cumberland Island.

Assess

  • Take anecdotal notes from the large/small group discussions.
  • Use the rubric to assess students' understanding of the objective.

Common Core Standards

Discipline: English Language Arts
Domain: Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): 4
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

Standards:

  • 4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • 4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • 4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

Discipline: English Language Arts
Domain: Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): 5
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

Standards:

  • 5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • 5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
  • 5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Discipline: English Language Arts
Domain: Reading: Informational Text
Grade(s): 6
Cluster: Key Ideas and Details

Standards:

  • 6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • 6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
  • 6.3 Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).

National Standards

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: English
Cluster: Applying Knowledge
Grade(s): K–12 

Standards:

  • K-12.6 Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: English
Cluster: Evaluating Data
Grade(s): K–12

Standards: 

  • K-12.7 Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

Discipline: Language Arts
Domain: English
Cluster: Developing Research Skills
Grade(s): K–12

Standards: 

  • K-12.8 Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.