Precious Metal Coins

The U.S. Mint produces precious metal coins for collectors and investors in gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. Proof and uncirculated coins are collected for their limited mintage numbers, while bullion coins offer a way to invest in precious metals.

Proof and Uncirculated Coins

Produced for collectors, proof and uncirculated precious metal coins range in composition. They can be gold, silver, platinum, or palladium of varying ounces or karats.

The term “proof” refers to a specialized minting process that begins by manually feeding burnished coin blanks into presses fitted with special dies. Each coin is struck multiple times so the softly frosted, yet detailed images seem to float above a mirror-like field. Uncirculated quality coins are produced the same way as circulating coins, but with quality enhancements to create a brilliant finish.

Watch the video below to learn how proof coins are made.

The Mint sells proof and uncirculated coins at a fixed price, and each coin includes a Certificate of Authenticity.

Learn more about our proof and uncirculated coins.

American Liberty Coins

The figure of Liberty appeared on our circulating coins for over 150 years, from 1793 to 1947. Throughout the decades, Liberty’s appearance and poses changed to reflect a changing America. In 2015, the Mint produced a gold coin with a modernized version of Liberty. In 2017 and 2019 two additional versions followed.

Learn about the new faces of Liberty.

Bullion Coins

A bullion coin is a coin that is valued by its weight in a specific precious metal. The U.S. government guarantees its weight, content, and purity. Unlike commemorative or numismatic coins valued by limited mintage, rarity, condition, or age, investors purchase bullion coins seeking a simple way to own and invest in the gold, silver, platinum, and palladium markets.

Watch the video below to learn how bullion coins are made.

The Mint does not sell bullion coins directly to the public. Instead, the Mint distributes the coins through a network of official distributors called “authorized purchasers”. Authorized purchasers create a two-way market buying and selling to wholesalers, financial institutions, and other secondary retailers.

Pricing for bullion coins typically depends on the market price of the metal, plus a small premium to cover minting, distribution, and marketing costs.

Learn more about our bullion coin programs.

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